Ubuntu Linux ddrescue - Can someone give me a good command to run in terminal?

I'm a newbie to Linux.
but I'm a confident Windows user.


I have a damaged hard drive with many bad sectors from my parents windows computer, attached via Sata cable to a Virtual Ubuntu (on my Windows Desktop).
I want to use ddrescue (GNU) to create a Disk Image.
Can someone tell me what to type into the ubuntu Terminal to achieve the following:
  • invoke ddrescue.
  • skip over bad sectors (to avoid wasting hours and hours of time).
  • create a Log (map file) to enable ddrescue to resume itself if the computer hangs or crashes or restarts.
  • avoid imaging the Windows System Files (MBR) partition (as I dont intend to restore windows.. I only want to recover data and not waste time imaging windows OS files).


Extra Questions (to add to the above):
  • Am I supposed to Un-Mount the damaged drive before invoking ddrescue ? how can I do this ?
  • Will I be able to run ddrescue a 2nd time more thoroughly to try to image the sectors that were skipped on the 1st image and then MERGE these 2 images to create a more complete image ?
  • Can I control how often the mapfile saves itself ?
  • Can I control how many attempts it makes to read a sector before skipping to the next sector ?


Software/hardware info
:
I'm running Ubuntu GNOME from a USB Memory Stick (virtual machine, and with Persistence on my Windows 7 Desktop computer).
Faulty Hard drive is connected to the motherboard with Sata Cable.

PS: Am I correct in doing this with Virtual Ubuntu ? or would I be better off installing ubuntu as a dual boot on my windows desktop ?
I am under the impression that the virtual machine Persistence setting will allow for the ddrescue mapfile to resume itself if the computer crashes or restarts.
 
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DelJo63

Imo, your approach is totally wrong. Understand you're not interested in a disk image, but you can't just skip over bad data. Run chkdsk c: /f /r or fsck to remap bad sectors. If that gets really ugly, then get a new drive!
 
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DelJo63

Linux HDs are found in the /dev mount point as
  • /dev/sd{a,b,c}N
The system will obey the /etc/fstab to automount the required partitions AFTER testing the boot device.

NEVER run fsck on a mounted device - - but who IS mounted? issue mount to see.
so first un-mount
  • umount /dev/sdxxx
then
  • fsck -M /dev/sdxxx
During a boot, the HDs will be scanned if
  1. the dirty bit is on
  2. the rescan period since last scan has lapsed