Windows 10 vs. Windows 11 Performance Test: Gaming, Application & Storage Benchmarks

Mugsy

Posts: 740   +174
I don't know if it means anything, but I ran "Cinebench 15" just before installing Win11 and got a score of 998. After the "upgrade"? 952.
 
So far the only reason to upgrade to 11 is to run Android apps natively. I wish there was a way to implement this to windows 10 by some update or so.
 

Trapped Nowhere

Posts: 98   +79
Last edited:

Thretosix

Posts: 111   +109
You just have to love that misleading Windows 11 commercial of some boy claiming that gaming to be significantly better just from upgrading to Windows 11.
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 600   +483
Thank you. Confused me at first but I finally got it to work. Would it be possible to do the same with a linux flavor or windows 7?
Linux already runs from a thumb drive

You can install a full version of Linux to a thumb drive or you can install Linux Live

Windows 7 can be installed to a thumb drive with WinToUSB and possibley a few other installers but you will be stuck with USB 2 boot speed

Only Windows 8 and newer can use USB 3

To see how bad USB 2 speed will be, try plugging your Win 11 thumb drive into a USB 2 port and boot it up

It's horrible
 

Trapped Nowhere

Posts: 98   +79
Linux already runs from a thumb drive

You can install a full version of Linux to a thumb drive or you can install Linux Live

Windows 7 can be installed to a thumb drive with WinToUSB and possibley a few other installers but you will be stuck with USB 2 boot speed

Only Windows 8 and newer can use USB 3

To see how bad USB 2 speed will be, try plugging your Win 11 thumb drive into a USB 2 port and boot it up

It's horrible
I have an external hdd that I'd prefer to use for win 7. that was the only way I manage to install 11. would that still limit it to usb 2.0 speed?
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 600   +483
I have an external hdd that I'd prefer to use for win 7. that was the only way I manage to install 11. would that still limit it to usb 2.0 speed?
Yes, Windows 7 will always be running at USB 2 speed when booting from any USB port, regardless of whether it is a thumb drive, hard drive, SSD or even a RAMDISK

Windows 7 is the limiting factor when running from any USB port

I use an 18" SATA and Power cable to attach SATA drives externally to get full speed from Windows 7, or I use an eSATA cable
 
Last edited:

Trapped Nowhere

Posts: 98   +79
Yes, Windows 7 will always be running at USB 2 speed when booting from any USB port, regardless of whether it is a thumb drive, hard drive, SSD or even a RAMDISK

Windows 7 is the limiting factor when running from any USB port

I use an 18" SATA and Power cable to attach SATA drives externally to get full speed from Windows 7, or I use an eSATA cable
ah, that explains it then. so would I be able to use this method directly to an internal ssd, or would I need to clone my external drive to it first? I don't have eSATA on my laptop unfortunately.
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 600   +483
ah, that explains it then. so would I be able to use this method directly to an internal ssd, or would I need to clone my external drive to it first? I don't have eSATA on my laptop unfortunately.

That's why I install Win2Go to a single MBR partition on thumb drives first using Aomei Partition Assistant or Rufus

A single MBR partition can easily be backed up using Acronis True Image and restored to a partition of any size (even smaller than 64GB)

The MBR backups will work on a standard SATA SSD as well as a thumb drive

Win2Go cannot be installed directly to a SATA SSD, so that is why I install to a thumb drive first

To use a MBR partition on a thumb drive, the thumb drive must be a "Fixed Disk"

There are very few "fixed disk" thumb drives still available as most are "removable disk"

When using a removable disk, Win2Go is installed to virtual partitions using a virtual hard drive (VHD) installation * (generally - depends on the installer used) *

When using a fixed disk, you can manually create multiple partitions as if it were a standard SATA SSD

The reason I use a Single MBR partition instead of GPT partitions is so that all of my backups are compatible with each other and easily restored to any drive

With a single MBR partition, I can restore "Windows XP" / 7 / 8.1 / 10 or Windows 11 to the same drive
(XP must be restored to an internal SATA SSD though, and GPT partitions are not compatible with XP)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HOWEVER,
Unless you require compatibility with Windows XP backups on an ancient Sandy Bridge computer (Like ME), you should probably stick with GPT and/or Virtual partitions on newer computers to avoid complications
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The best and fastest "fixed disk" thumb drive still available is the Corsair GTX

I still have older Sandisk Extreme thumb drives that are fixed disk, but I don't think they sell those anymore
 
Last edited:

bexwhitt

Posts: 560   +246
Funny how you Apple/Mac loving people compare Apple Hardware upgrades with Microsoft software upgrades.

I love this comparison. It appears non-biased and accurate while other media sites just plainly say Windows 11 is faster. Thanks.

One question for comparison: Is there a performance difference between Windows and Linux Subsystems? I immediately enable WSL upon installation because I feel it is more secure (maybe, maybe not) and I use Ubuntu terminals on my PC.

The Lastest MacOS update was 12.3 GB and it's more crape I don't need
 

mAdmAnDingo

Posts: 92   +81
I think the problem here is there aren't any games that utilize this feature yet for testing. All the same Windows 10 can still do direct access storage regardless.
Correct. Direct Storage is an API that uses hardware to achieve its performance increases/features (like all Direct X features), and it needs games to be programmed from the ground up to take advantage of it (like any new Direct X version/Direct X feature), and there are no released PC games yet that are programmed to take advantage of said API and hardware.

But, the last time I read about its progress with game devs on Microsoft's dev blog a while ago, there are several unnamed PC games currently in development that will take advantage of it at their launch. So lets wait and see for some games that actually use DS API before we make a call on its possible performance benefits for gaming (decreased load times, better asset streaming, reduced CPU load etc).

But DS API is coming to Win10 as well, so if it turns out to be a decent feature (which it very likely could, it does indeed have potential when going by the papers I've read on it), then Win10 users can still take advantage of it as well (as long as they have supporting hardware of course).

Of note though, is that MS says Win11 will perform "slightly" better with DS API than Win10's DS API thanks to an improved storage stack, but I am guessing "slightly" means "hardly noticeable", we will have to wait for benchmarks to know for certain though, either way it sounds like Win10 will have the majority of DS API's performance benefits.
 
Last edited:
Hi.
I dont see the ,, 20-26% performance increase” you mentioned
Reading and writing from SSD disks.
Can you show a testing diagram showing that?