Xiaomi is now the world's largest smartphone vendor

midian182

Posts: 7,148   +63
Staff member
In brief: For Xiaomi, it's a case of first Europe, now the world. Having recently been crowned the top smartphone vendor on the continent, the Chinese giant has just knocked Samsung off the number one spot in the global sales rankings.

According to Counterpoint Research, Xiaomi has become the number one brand in global monthly smartphone sales (sell-through) volumes. It took a 17.1% share of the market in June, outselling both Samsung (15.7%) and Apple (14.3%).

2021 has been Xiaomi's year. The company recently became the largest smartphone vendor in Europe and, in the second quarter, replaced Apple as the world's number two. Now, it sits at the top of the pile above Samsung.

As noted by Ars Technica, Xiaomi's rise has been aided by a huge presence in its home market of China, the world's largest smartphone market, and India—the second biggest. It also has 58 phones listed on its website, ranging from budget models to flagships.

"Ever since the decline of Huawei commenced, Xiaomi has been making consistent and aggressive efforts to fill the gap created by this decline," said Counterpoint Research Director Tarun Pathak. "The OEM has been expanding in Huawei's and HONOR's legacy markets like China, Europe, Middle East, and Africa. In June, Xiaomi was further helped by China, Europe, and India's recovery and Samsung's decline due to supply constraints."

Counterpoint believes Xiaomi's position at the top may be short-lived. A wave of Covid infections in Vietnam in June disrupted Samsung's production, resulting in shortages. The Korean firm could move back into the number one position once it recovers.

According to Korean publication The Elec, Samsung is "extending its management review" of the mobile business, something it does "when the top leadership considers there is a problem with a particular business unit." It says the move has been prompted by missing target sales for the Galaxy S21 and lacklustre performance in 5G smartphones.

Yesterday saw Xiaomi reveal another of its non-mobile products: a rather sinister-looking quadrupedal robot called CyberDog.

Permalink to story.

 

JohnSmithESP

Posts: 67   +40
Hope they stop doing some **** with MIUI, between the ads by default in apps that they clearly doesn't seem to need seeing this, nor the 400 ****-tons of telemetry and data collecting, and some "let's modify this without any intend of checking what it breaks" (it's not the norm, truth be told)... And more updates for longer instead of having 15 phones per generation.
Because they have some good phone, and if you blind pick one it's not too bad, and I can pass MIUI not being near close to Stock.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,800   +2,154
TechSpot Elite
"According to Korean publication The Elec, Samsung is "extending its management review" of the mobile business, something it does "when the top leadership considers there is a problem with a particular business unit." It says the move has been prompted by missing target sales for the Galaxy S21 and lacklustre performance in 5G smartphones."
I think it's more that Android users aren't as mentally blank as iOS users and aren't exactly thrilled with phones that cost as much as a gaming desktop PC. Phones that cost over $1,000 are perhaps the only thing in tech that is more absurd than a "gaming" craptop.
 

JKnight

Posts: 154   +225
The only thing stopping me from buying a Xiaomi phone is MIUI, privacy concerns from their preinstalled apps, and Android updates. There were two phones from Xiaomi that were a part of Google's Android One program but, Xiaomi stopped being part of the program.
 

HotToz

Posts: 37   +56
Can't wait for free market champions, the US, to destroy a free market competitor by declaring it a spying agent of the Chinese just like they did with HTC.
They already tried but Xiaomi won the lawsuit , may be the US authorities though it was too obvious two biggest chinese mobile phone manufacture blacklisted at the same time and let one escape.

By the way the other one was Huawei no HTC
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 1,097   +2,077
They already tried but Xiaomi won the lawsuit , may be the US authorities though it was too obvious two biggest chinese mobile phone manufacture blacklisted at the same time and let one escape.

By the way the other one was Huawei no HTC
Corrected that Huawei part, thanks.

Also I know they lost the lawsuit but well if they really want to crush em, it's really difficult to win a lawsuit against the people that both make and enforce the law itself: if they let em slide is because they were small potatoes compared to Huawei, maybe not so much anymore.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,697   +1,774
Living in fear is not living.
I'm more worried what my own country could do to me let alone what China could do.

Xiaomi is making Samsung and Apple look like chumps. Wake me when those two stop ripping people off.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,800   +2,154
TechSpot Elite
Can't wait for free market champions, the US, to destroy a free market competitor by declaring it a spying agent of the Chinese just like they did with HTC.
Are you sure you don't mean Huawei and ZTE? I had two ZTE phones before I got my Motorola Moto-G LTE. The only reason that I got the Moto-G was because my network switched from CDMA to GSM. Both of my ZTE phones worked just fine. The first was the N762 which I just got because I'd never had a smartphone before, it was only $50CAD and I thought that it was a good phone to just try out the Android environment. I figured that, at the very worst, it would still function as a phone at least as well as a conventional cellphone at the time.

Using it made me realise that I never wanted a conventional cellphone again and a year later I spent $80CAD on my provider's more powerful smartphone at the time, the ZTE N860 Warp. I really liked it and used it for a couple of years. I only got a couple of years out of it because, as I said, the network switched to GSM from CDMA and my Warp became unusable as anything but a small Android WiFi tablet at that point. It was good for bathroom use for a few years before its single-core ARM7 (Snapdragon S2) and only 500MB of RAM became more or less useless for that as well.

I still use it as my alarm clock though. It works great as an alarm clock. Better to use it for that instead of adding it to the e-waste pile. :laughing:
 
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redhat

Posts: 170   +215
"As noted by Ars Technica, Xiaomi's rise has been aided by a huge presence in its home market of China"

Wrong note, Xiaomi makes decent phones with the best performance/price ratio in the market. I have Poco f2 pro (350 euro) and the hardware is on par with S20 (500 - 600 Euro). the software is not yet mature but overall it is amazing phone.

I still remember when iPhone 6 and galaxy S6 were costing 250 for apple and Samsung yet they were selling the phones for about 600
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 1,097   +2,077
Are you sure you don't mean Huawei and ZTE? I had two ZTE phones before I got my Motorola Moto-G LTE. The only reason that I got the Moto-G was because my network switched from CDMA to GSM. Both of my ZTE phones worked just fine. The first was the N762 which I just got because I'd never had a smartphone before and it was only $50CAD and I thought that it was a good phone to just try out the Android environment. I figured that, at the very worst, it would still function as a phone at least as well as a conventional cellphone at the time.

Using it made me realise that I never wanted a conventional cellphone again and a year later I spent $80CAD on my provider's more powerful smartphone at the time, the ZTE N860 Warp. I really liked it and used it for a couple of years. I only got a couple of years out of it because, as I said, the network switched to GSM from CDMA and my Warp became unusable as anything but a small Android WiFi tablet at that point. It was good for bathroom use for a few years before its single-core ARM7 (Snapdragon S2) and only 500MB of RAM became more or less useless for that as well.

I still use it as my alarm clock though. It works great as an alarm clock. Better to use it for that instead of adding it to the e-waste pile. :laughing:
Yes I corrected my post I did mean Huawei
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,800   +2,154
TechSpot Elite
The only thing stopping me from buying a Xiaomi phone is MIUI, privacy concerns from their preinstalled apps, and Android updates. There were two phones from Xiaomi that were a part of Google's Android One program but, Xiaomi stopped being part of the program.
Since none of the allegations that the US government made were ever backed up by any kind of solid evidence, why do you believe them? They've told far more lies than truths in the past so to take what they say at face value is incredibly naïve. I've never heard of someone who had their data stolen by a ZTE or Huawei phone (and I owned TWO ZTE phones) despite the garbage that gets said on CNN.

Remember, CNN asserted that during the Gulf War, the American-made Raytheon Patriot anti-missile system worked fantastically well when in fact, it was almost completely useless. I say "almost" because there was actually a single confirmed intercept of an Iraqi SCUD missile. The rest of the Patriots used were nothing more than flushing money down the toilet into the pockets of Raytheon, Inc.

A lot was said about Huawei but none of it was proven. I think that this was nothing more than a Trumpian attempt to put pressure on China for the upcoming trade war that Donald Trump had envisioned (even though he was certainly no visionary).
 

JKnight

Posts: 154   +225
Since none of the allegations that the US government made were ever backed up by any kind of solid evidence, why do you believe them? They've told far more lies than truths in the past so to take what they say at face value is incredibly naïve. I've never heard of someone who had their data stolen by a ZTE or Huawei phone (and I owned TWO ZTE phones) despite the garbage that gets said on CNN.

Remember, CNN asserted that during the Gulf War, the American-made Raytheon Patriot anti-missile system worked fantastically well when in fact, it was almost completely useless. I say "almost" because there was actually a single confirmed intercept of an Iraqi SCUD missile. The rest of the Patriots used were nothing more than flushing money down the toilet into the pockets of Raytheon, Inc.

A lot was said about Huawei but none of it was proven. I think that this was nothing more than a Trumpian attempt to put pressure on China for the upcoming trade war that Donald Trump had envisioned (even though he was certainly no visionary).


Security researchers have reported in the article above.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,800   +2,154
TechSpot Elite

Security researchers have reported in the article above.
That's an article about the Xiaomi Web Browser, not about the phone itself. What the US government has been claiming is that Huawei and ZTE had put extra microchips that sent the sensitive data directly to China independent of the software used. You know, the way that LG "smart" TVs were spying on people and sending actual camera footage back to LG despite people not even being aware that there was a camera in the TV.

That Xiaomi browser is far more likely to be for spying on the Chinese than anyone else because that's what they do to their own people even more than anyone else. If that's the extent of the "BIG BAD SECURITY RISK", all you need to do is use a different browser. Firefox and Opera both have Android versions and are both rock-solid when it comes to privacy. In order to circumvent this issue, all that a country has to do is to ban the Xiaomi browser. That makes this whole thing a non-issue.

I don't know if you read the article you linked to but this was said by the author:
"I know that many will chime in with the inevitable answer, “just change your browser.” While that’s a totally reasonable suggestion and probably something you should do, it does not let Xiaomi off the hook."
Of course it doesn't because this "article" is a hit-piece, it's the opinion of Suzana Dalul, someone who has apparently been an "Android Enthusiast" since 2010 but has no real qualifications.

Now, I'll agree 100% that she could be a rock-solid expert on Android if she delved into it deep enough for those 11 years but her expertise works against her here. You see, she should know better than this. She's using language to create fear and uncertainty in the reader. I majored in PoliSci at university and so I can recognise the style immediately. After all, politics is about persuasion through subversion. This writing style is one tactic, albeit a tactic used by lazy people to compel the ignorant. It works remarkably well against Americans which is why the US corporate media is always trying to frighten the population with loads of BS.

This is because that whole article is designed to turn the reader against Xiaomi. She went on and on and on about the goddamn Xiaomi BROWSER, something that NOBODY in the West would use anyway (As if anyone is going to use that instead of Firefox, Opera, Chrome or Edge, give me a FiretrUCKing break!) and then shows that absurdly easy fix at the end of the article. Then she says something completely nonsensical like "This doesn't let Xiaomi off of the hook, though." which makes me wonder if she uses Google and/or Windows 10 because Google collects EVERYTHING and Cortana has been referred to as malware by some experts.

This whole thing is a nothing-burger cooked up by the US government to try and manufacture public consent for going to war with China. Personally, I couldn't think of any idea more stupid and dangerous than a direct shooting war between two nuclear nations. If you fell for that article, then I'm afraid that the situation is worse than I originally thought.