AMD Radeon HD 7770 & 7750 Crossfire Performance Tested

By on March 15, 2012, 11:18 PM

After reviewing AMD's $550 Radeon HD 7970 in December, we were excited to lay hands on some more affordable Southern Islands cards. Unfortunately, our enthusiasm was short-lived when the wallet-friendly Radeon HD 7770 and HD 7750 arrived in February. The latter was a tad slower than the last-gen GeForce GTX 550 Ti, though also less expensive and more power efficient, while HD 7770 was priced pretty close to the GeForce GTX 560 at $160 but couldn't match up to it in terms of performance.

At the end of the day, neither HD 7700 series card really pushed the envelope in terms of value. Part of that presumably stems from the fact that Nvidia hasn't launched its GTX 600 series yet, allowing AMD to have its way with the market. When Nvidia's Kepler products finally arrive (rumored for late Q1/early Q2), we're hoping some pricing adjustments follow. If (when?) that occurs, the HD 7700 series could become more attractive overnight -- and not just in single-card setups.

The old HD 5750 and 5770 were popular Crossfire candidates and the same could be true of the HD 7700 series if it's priced right. Anticipating that day, we're testing the HD 7750 and HD 7770 in Crossfire across more than a dozen games to see how well they scale and compare against cards such as the HD 6870 and GTX 560 Ti. Those looking for more info about the HD 7700 series should read our launch day coverage. Everyone else: buckle up and let's take these cards for another spin.

Read the complete review.




User Comments: 20

Got something to say? Post a comment
LinkedKube LinkedKube, TechSpot Project Baby, said:

Nice read. I think the 7770 configurations will make the new 7000 series purchases interesting.

Guest said:

Hey what's the motherboard in the photo's?

I looked at "Gigabyte G1.Assassin2" with Google images and found it's a different Green looking motherboard....

amythompson172 said:

Great article. The 7870 and 7770 cards are simply amazing, with such low power useage.

Staff
Steve Steve said:

Hey what's the motherboard in the photo's?

I looked at "Gigabyte G1.Assassin2" with Google images and found it's a different Green looking motherboard....

Its the Asus P9X79 Deluxe which we just used as a prop for the photo...

The board was featured in this article...

[link]

Sarcasm Sarcasm said:

How bout some 7850 and 7870 CF testing? Pretty please

JC713 JC713 said:

While testing Skyrim, you guys forgot the HD texture pack. Same with Crysis 2, you should really torture the 7770 with both DX11 patch and tecture pack.

Guest said:

Thanks for showing once again that HD7750/7770 series are insanely overpriced (or their performance is extremely weak). 2.5 years later after HD5770 launched, HD7770 is barely 25% faster and gets destroyed by HD6870/GTX560Ti. For $150-160, AMD must be smoking something.

This generation just underlines the same story as we've seen for a while now -- buying last generation mid-range cards is better than buying new generation low-end cards.

I honestly think we won't see any strong value in GPUs until next year. Both NV and AMD are struggling with low 28nm capacity due to TSMC's ramp-up and more expensive 28nm wafers. It'll be a while before we get something as good as a $140 HD6870 in relative terms.

Guest said:

I beleive the cards are excellent ones, perfectly up to all expectations but price. And the reason why they're so overpriced is to push the HD6000s off the shelves while their current price point is still good.

I think the HD7000s will have a big fat price drop when AMD sees their previous generations overall stock are sufficiently low and their partners won't take a hit when they sell the newer ones at their real intended price points with normal margins. They don't want partners to be stuck with too many older model in inventory, especially when the ASP of those cards will start dropping fast after that.

EEatGDL said:

I found the 7750s configuration quite interesting while comparing it with the GTX 560 Ti -a bit more performance, a bit cheaper and draws less power. Looking forward beginning of May's benchmarks (Intel IB + NVIDIA Kepler).

Guest said:

HD7770 is slower than a 15 months old HD6870. HD6870 can be purchased for $140-150, easily. It would only be an improvement if they priced it at $119-129 and it offered the same performance as the HD6870. Because it's slower, it should only cost $99-109. Yet AMD wants $159 for this turd? LOL.

Also 2x HD7750 can barely match a stock GTX560Ti. GTX560Ti overclocks to GTX570 speeds. 2 cards are always worse:

1) Micro-stutter

2) Needs CF profiles for all games (so less than popular games will not have proper scaling)

3) AMD stops working on drivers for older cards and shifts its focus on newer cards (see HD4870X2, HD5970, and even HD6990).

There is no reason to buy 2 of HD7750/7770. A person would be far better off getting an HD7850/7870 and overclocking them.

Sarcasm Sarcasm said:

Guest said:

I beleive the cards are excellent ones, perfectly up to all expectations but price. And the reason why they're so overpriced is to push the HD6000s off the shelves while their current price point is still good.

I think the HD7000s will have a big fat price drop when AMD sees their previous generations overall stock are sufficiently low and their partners won't take a hit when they sell the newer ones at their real intended price points with normal margins. They don't want partners to be stuck with too many older model in inventory, especially when the ASP of those cards will start dropping fast after that.

This is probably one of the reasons.

My guess on the high prices of the 7000 series are:

1. First to market with no competition yet from Nvidia on 28nm

2. Get rid of the old stock as much as possible

3. Get as much early adopter profit as possible

4. Nab the unaware general with marketing as "Newer = must be better"

We're not going to see prices come down unless Nvidia comes out the gate guns blazing with competitive pricing. But honestly, how many people really think if Kepler comes out faster than the 7000 series, they will still price it higher according to performance. For example, if the GTX680 is 20% faster than a 7970, I'm sure they're going to price it higher to justify the difference. I'm expecting a $599 price tag. In this situation, the consumers ALL LOSE.

Sarcasm Sarcasm said:

Guest said:

HD7770 is slower than a 15 months old HD6870. HD6870 can be purchased for $140-150, easily. It would only be an improvement if they priced it at $119-129 and it offered the same performance as the HD6870. Because it's slower, it should only cost $99-109. Yet AMD wants $159 for this turd? LOL.

Also 2x HD7750 can barely match a stock GTX560Ti. GTX560Ti overclocks to GTX570 speeds. 2 cards are always worse:

1) Micro-stutter

2) Needs CF profiles for all games (so less than popular games will not have proper scaling)

3) AMD stops working on drivers for older cards and shifts its focus on newer cards (see HD4870X2, HD5970, and even HD6990).

There is no reason to buy 2 of HD7750/7770. A person would be far better off getting an HD7850/7870 and overclocking them.

You're right, I was actually shopping for a low-mid range card for my second computer and was looking at the 7770 vs 6850OC at Fry's. The 7770 was $169 while the 6850OC was $144.99 after rebate. And yes I grabbed the 6850 instead. $25 cheaper while performing 10-15% better = no brainer to me. The 7770 is probably the worst value card released in a long time. AMD has gone mad I tells yah.

But the 7850/7870s are the real winners and make up for the pricing disaster.

Guest said:

HD7770 is a waste of 28nm wafer. Overclocked HD5770 performs almost the same or better. The X770 seems to be limited by 128bit memory interface. AMD did a lousy implementation of the X770. What a disgrace. Next X770 with 28nm needs to be at least 192bit memory interface to get back on track as a modern affordable gaming card. Pisses me off AMD did a such a bad job with this card.

Guest said:

HD7850 and HD7870 are not looking very hot either. Only feature set AMD's new 28nm cards have that is valuable to some is 3GB of Vram.

Other than that 28nm performance from AMD is mediocre improvement at a ridiculous high price point.

I hope NVIDIA can bring some common sense in performance and pricing to the 28nm cards.

amstech amstech, TechSpot Enthusiast, said:

The people bashing 128bit cards are obviously quite un-educated.

They are great cards for using less power and offering good to great performance.

When 5770's released, you could get a pair for $320 and beat/match a $400 5870 in minimum, average and max frames.

Obviously this isn't the case for this generation and I agree its not smart to CrossfireX them from the get go, but for what they are they do ok AMD just needs to drop the price some.

Guest said:

I really wish you would have thrown a 5870 in the mix.

The 5870, despite being almost 4 years old now, is around 5-10% faster than the 6870. It would have been interesting to see how 4 year old hardware that sells for about $150 on ebay did against $300+ crossfired cards.

The 5870 is also interesting because in most reviews it's about as fast as the $250+ 7850

The reason the 5870 beats most cards is the huge number of shaders, 1600

I just picked up a 5870 since it's by far the fastest card to be had for only $150. If anyone's looking for a 6xxx or 7xxx series card and you want to save some money I highly recommend taking a look at the 5870

Guest said:

since there is no need for a bridge for the 7750s, can you crossfire 3 if your board has 3 x16 slots?

Staff
Steve Steve said:

since there is no need for a bridge for the 7750s, can you crossfire 3 if your board has 3 x16 slots?

Because there is no bridge there is just enough bandwidth to Crossfire two.

Guest said:

ah ok thank you

Atari Atari said:

since there is no need for a bridge for the 7750s, can you crossfire 3 if your board has 3 x16 slots?

Because there is no bridge there is just enough bandwidth to Crossfire two.

Would you please elaborate upon this?

Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.