Lenovo Erazer X700 Gaming PC Review

By on December 3, 2013, 12:29 AM

As the globe’s largest PC maker, Lenovo is well-known for its diverse portfolio of offerings spanning home and business. Gaming, on the other hand, is one area Lenovo has mostly ignored over the years. With that in mind, we introduce to you the Erazer X700 -- Lenovo’s first stab at a PC tailored for gamers.

Features which qualify the X700 as a full-fledged gaming PC are its unique exterior, performance-centered parts, ample tool-free expandability, liquid cooling and OneKey overclocking. Sound good so far?

Our review unit houses an Intel Core i7-3820, Geforce GTX 660, 12GB RAM and a 1TB HDD and a 128GB Samsung SSD. This is actually the same model available at Best Buy for $1699. It’s worth noting though that we continue to see the non-SSD version for a promotional price of $1290 directly from Lenovo.

Read the complete review.




User Comments: 22

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Guest said:

A tidy cable management should come with the price.

I'd love to buy that case separately, though.

ikesmasher said:

It might be worth noting the keyboard is a rebranded saitek eclipse II.

Which impresses me honestly, im typing on one now.

This is the one premade gaming PC ive seen that I havent instantly laughed off because of its price.

1 person liked this | GhostRyder GhostRyder said:

After reading and looking at the listed specs, if you just get the base one without the SSD, its not a bad deal for a gaming PC pre-built at $1290. But seriously, getting the SSD makes the price 1700???? That makes no sense....

I also don't understand why this has Sandy Bridge-E instead of Ivy Bridge-E, seems like that would have been a nice upgrade. The case itself is pretty awesome, looks really nice and like it has a lot of room to spare.

thelatestmodel thelatestmodel said:

It seems to me that Lenovo have had a pretty good stab at this, and to the average customer it's probably a good deal, if a little juvenile.

However, I'm really put off by the cable management, tiny board and no-name power supply. If you own a gaming PC it's nice to be able to open it up and show it off, but I'd just be embarrassed.

GhostRyder GhostRyder said:

@thelatestmodel

Well most companies that are not like ibuypower or cyberpowerpc when making rigs use a no-name PSU and a small motherboard. That's a general thing, if you open up for instance an alienware aurora (we have a few on the site I work at for reasons im unsure of) they have some nice hardware, but the PSU just says 80+ and its wattage (800 in these cases). The motherboards are the same thing, to cut costs normally whatever the PC is bundled with to begin with, the motherboard is designed only to run with that equipment you paid for. In the past, ive known Dell to remove/never put on the AGP slot on the motherboard if you bought a computer running off the integrated chip. For this to actually have 2 PCI-E lanes that can support SLI/CFX is quite nice honestly even though im sure this motherboard is anything but "top of the line".

thelatestmodel thelatestmodel said:

@thelatestmodel

Well most companies that are not like ibuypower or cyberpowerpc when making rigs use a no-name PSU and a small motherboard. That's a general thing, if you open up for instance an alienware aurora (we have a few on the site I work at for reasons im unsure of) they have some nice hardware, but the PSU just says 80+ and its wattage (800 in these cases). The motherboards are the same thing...

I know they are doing it to cut costs - this ain't my first rodeo. All I'm saying is that if a company is going to do a "premium" computer aimed at gamers, they should at least pay attention to detail and not be so obvious when it comes to cutting costs. It doesn't need to be a complete mess when you take the side off!

Guest said:

Well, the exterior is... striking, no doubt.

Guest said:

Excess plastic indeed: [link]

I like my computers to be sleek/elegant. I've got gaming rig packed into a little Mini-ITX Fractal Design Node 304: [link] ...lots of horsepower tucked away in a case the size of a small subwoofer.

Guest said:

Does it transform into a truck?

Guest said:

I really like the design! I like the sharp edges, the glossy finish and the color led lit parts of it. However, it does like all the other gaming PC cases though, but doesn't mean its bad.

theruck said:

A wifi card and a homeless sound card. what a disappointment for a gaming PC

ikesmasher said:

Does it transform into a truck?

Its a decepticon. It transforms into a mac pro "trash can."

JC713 JC713 said:

This is a good start for Lenovo. I think the next gen will have more upgrade options.

St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

Uh, RAM doesn't even run in native quad-channel. What the hell? To upgrade it you need to toss out every RAM stick.

DKRON said:

Uh, RAM doesn't even run in native quad-channel. What the hell? To upgrade it you need to toss out every RAM stick.

That's pretty pointless having socket 2011 and not running quad-channel, also where are they getting a HD8970?

St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

That's pretty pointless having socket 2011 and not running quad-channel, also where are they getting a HD8970?

Indeed! And the 8000 series are OEM-only, on-par with the R7/R9/etc release.

DKRON said:

I had a feeling they were the same cards, just seemed unusual why AMD have both on their website

GhostRyder GhostRyder said:

@St1ckM4n I was aware of the HD 8XXX mobile series but have yet to see an OEM machine with an HD 8970 let alone here of one which confuses me why its listed on the site or what computers are using them.

St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

Not sure. AMD page says they are all OEM. 2nd google result for a 'leak' shows it's an upgraded 7970.

GhostRyder GhostRyder said:

@St1ckM4n Yea, well us country folk call that there card an R9 280X :P

But seriously, its an oddity, I was curious why they even exist to begin with, does not make much sense.

1 person liked this | DKRON said:

Could it be because normal consumers don't understand their new naming so AMD just use the same cards but call them 8970, 8950 and so on to simply make it easier for them to understand

Staff
Rick Rick, TechSpot Staff, said:

It might be worth noting the keyboard is a rebranded saitek eclipse II.

Which impresses me honestly, im typing on one now.

Thanks for that. I had assumed the keyboard was a re-badged something-or-other, but couldn't find anything that looked identical. I'm still wondering about that mouse though...

I also don't understand why this has Sandy Bridge-E instead of Ivy Bridge-E, seems like that would have been a nice upgrade.

I was a bit surprised by this, myself.

Even with its current config though, the CPU kind of outshines the GPU choice. It seems like an odd choice, but it likely came down to logistics and/or price for Lenovo.

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