Intel works on Super Resolution technology

By Derek Sooman on March 16, 2005, 4:07 PM
Intel is currently working on a "Super Resolution" technology that can uncover hidden information in digital images and videos and create output files of significantly higher resolution and quality. The technology may well one day help to reduce the bandwidth required to transmit video files, and also to enhance the quality of digital pictures.

A typical commercial application of SR is in fact crime scene investigation, since real digital resolution enhancements is very much on the horizon and unclear objects that are blurred for example by artifacts can be uncovered with the technology. The resolution of pictures taken with cell phones will be enough for poster-sized prints and low-resolution videos transmitted via a cellphone could be reconstructed to DVD quality movies.




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Nic said:
Sounds as fanciable as the super compression technology that can compress anything down to one bit through successive passes...in your dreams (note: this was actually proposed in a patent once!). Needless to say, you can't enhance details that aren't there, which is exactly as stated in the article refered to in the link, but what is suggested is that by combining details captured from multiple source images (e.g. successive video frames) it is possible to create a new image that is of higher resolution than any one of the original source images. The technique uses the differences between each image to make a good guess at what details are actually present in the scene. This is certainly possible, and something similar has been used in radar equipment for many years to pick out details in a noisy signal. I think it was called something like 'correlation' in radar theory, though I think there are some differences in this new 'SR' technique. What is similar is that slightly different images are being compared so that additional information can be extrapolated, whereas in radar theory the comparison was done to pick out details in the noise. Still, just goes to show that there is very little thesedays that is completely new. Now, I wonder if they'll patent the idea?
Mictlantecuhtli said:
[url]http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4107736.html[/url]Lowry Digital Images has been doing this with movies for years.
bringinheat said:
I am sure there is something new to this technology that made it a headline in every tech website. An improvement on an exisiting technology is an improvement nevertheless. Otherwise we would all be driving ford model Ts.
Major_Reno said:
Super Resolution has been around for more than 20 years. There are dozens of labs in the world doing research in this field. Only recently though hardware has advanced to allow for the layman to have any use of the numerous existing algorithms.Be on the watchout for end-user software products coming out in the weeks to come.MR
jekinsson said:
[b]Originally posted by Major_Reno:[/b][quote]Only recently though hardware has advanced to allow for the layman to have any use of the numerous existing algorithms.Be on the watchout for end-user software products coming out in the weeks to come.[/quote]PhotoAcute provides superresolution for digital photos and video frames. This is an end-user software, so superresolution genie is now released from scientific labs :)[url]http://photoacute.com[/url]
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