AMD wants proof that video games can teach

By Justin Mann on May 5, 2009, 6:53 PM
AMD wants the world to know that video gaming is more than just blowing things up and shooting everything possible. The company believes that games can help learn, and might even have a place in schools. In fact, they want students to help them prove it. Working with the Learning Games Network, AMD is sponsoring the “A-ha Moment” video contest, in which they are asking school students to craft a video that demonstrates how games helped them reinforce skills they learned.

For the rest of the month, they will be accepting videos from people in two categories, the first of which is seeking for explanations from young gamers on how a particular event or moment in a game helped them learn. The second is for them to try and justify a game being used as an education tool. In each case, AMD will rate the videos and determine who made the best of the best.

Of course, AMD is not looking for scientific evidence here, just opinions from actual gamers. The company is giving away hardware for those they select as winners, similar to their current on-going contests celebrating their longevity. Prizes will include several AMD-powered HP notebooks. You can read more about AMD's endeavors in education here.




User Comments: 8

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skitzo_zac said:
"AMD wants the world to know that video gaming is more than just blowing things up and shooting everything possible." Of course its about more than that, it's also about hijacking cars, raidng dungeons for gold and rare items, about racing vehicles at insane speeds, about protecting Earth from alien invasions, about commanding huge armies, about re living WW2 a thousand times.
hellokitty[hk] said:
I've had a friend seriously try studying for a WWII test with COD, hah didn't work xD, maybe because he is just not the best at school.Well, computer science classes ftw?I'm sure gaming is far more than just shooting, higher level gaming no doubt exercises your reaction times, your "fight of flight" abilities, decision making skills (closely tied to fight or flight), and i'm sure good games work your strategy, and to an extent behavioral analysis, probably much more too.
black_adder said:
Well im not Sure about education purposes, but gaming has certainly provided me with a huge reflex and perception Buff :3But seriously, I notice little things, and observe everything, my reflexes are pretty amazing... and im pretty sure it was down to gaming.As for education... Hmmm. that will be difficult. I do, however, believe that playing an educational interactive game will do more for a student than writing everything the teacher says so that they can later 're-read' the notes. Yeah, cause all kids do that.Its a well known fact that people learn FAR more through interactivity and involment than a boring lecturer drilling facts into their ears.
hamsteyr said:
black_adder's claim seconded. My reflexes and perception is much much faster than those non gamer friends of mine hahaha... Days and months and years of Shooters XD But yes, i do believe that educational games exist. I'm not talking about kiddy games with little mexican girls running around, but actual games that hardcore gamers play. I've actually learned a bit of world war II from playing games, mostly through how much people were involved, how many died, and you know, just how epic it was sort of. I think its more of up to the game devs themselves who determine whether they want to make the game educational as well...
captain828 said:
Heh, interesting article. [b]RTS games[/b] should be the most famous for this kind of stuff.Sure, most of them are arcade(ish), but they still teach you how to use tactics.For eg. you'd be damn dum to attack a Tiger tank in the front armor with a squad of Riflemen in CoH. You need to flank it and trow sticky bombs.Not to mention the level of gameplay in SupCom, where you need to have a steady economy, infrastructure, production, and also tactical elements come into play such as defense, recon and WMD usage. Hell, even in StarCraft you learn things: dynamic management of units and resources, rapid base expansion, making proper use of rushes etc.[b]Team-oriented shooter games[/b] also have lots of educational value. Eg.: beneath the huuuuge manslaughter of zombies in L4D's survival mode you won't get a silver (not to mention a gold!) medal unless there is careful planning and great team communication. These are real-life skills.Also, [b]simulators[/b], of all kind, have some pretty clear educational values because they directly teach you how to do a certain thing. Like flying in FSX, racing in SimBin's games or shooting in AA. And I could even add a couple of [b]recent indie games[/b]: World of Goo, Cogs, Braid are some examples.[Edited by captain828 on 2009-05-06 02:39:40]
czplayer said:
[b]Originally posted by captain828:[/b][quote]Heh, interesting article. [b]RTS games[/b] should be the most famous for this kind of stuff.Sure, most of them are arcade(ish), but they still teach you how to use tactics.For eg. you'd be damn dum to attack a Tiger tank in the front armor with a squad of Riflemen in CoH. You need to flank it and trow sticky bombs.Not to mention the level of gameplay in SupCom, where you need to have a steady economy, infrastructure, production, and also tactical elements come into play such as defense, recon and WMD usage. Hell, even in StarCraft you learn things: dynamic management of units and resources, rapid base expansion, making proper use of rushes etc.[b]Team-oriented shooter games[/b] also have lots of educational value. Eg.: beneath the huuuuge manslaughter of zombies in L4D's survival mode you won't get a silver (not to mention a gold!) medal unless there is careful planning and great team communication. These are real-life skills.Also, [b]simulators[/b], of all kind, have some pretty clear educational values because they directly teach you how to do a certain thing. Like flying in FSX, racing in SimBin's games or shooting in AA. And I could even add a couple of [b]recent indie games[/b]: World of Goo, Cogs, Braid are some examples.[Edited by captain828 on 2009-05-06 02:39:40][/quote]Tell me, how do you apply learning how to stop a tank in cod to real life?
tengeta said:
Just show military training games, those teach troops around the world how to operate in situations without having to actually come up with the scenario in real life.That alone should be enough proof, especially given the average intelligence of the entering servicemen in the US. If you can get something through to them, it works.
hellokitty[hk] said:
Tell me, how do you apply learning how to stop a tank in cod to real life?[/quote]Thats not the point.And the person above sounds like StarCraft doesn't mean quite as much, however, I disagree politely :). After all, i'm sure NaDa gets paid more than most other RTS gamers with his previous $200,000 per year USD for three years :D, but that is in Korea.Starcraft FTW!Shooters are quite similar to RTS's too except in gameplay, you still have to react fast enough and properly to counter whatever you opponent is doing. Now in a PvZ starcraft match (say Bisu v Savoir), Bisu i'm sure would quick corsair and attack Savoir's overlord, while Savoir would have to react quickly by bringing in ground units to protect his overlords, but certainly not mutalisks.
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