Intel Core i3 530 listed online ahead of official launch

By on December 9, 2009, 11:01 AM
Intel is not expected to officially launch its new Clarkdale processors until early next year, but that hasn't stopped a Canadian online retailer from putting up early listings for a Core i3 530 priced at around $150. Coinciding with previous leaks, the processor is a dual-core part clocked at 2.9GHz with 4MB of L3 cache and has a TDP rating of 73W.

This is one of the first processors to be released under Intel's upcoming Westmere architecture, which will be made using the company's 32nm manufacturing process, and come internally connected to a separate 45nm part that houses a GPU and dual-channel memory controller all in the same package. Other LGA 1156 chips in this family include the Core i5 660, Core i3 540, and Pentium G6950.




User Comments: 9

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compdata compdata, TechSpot Paladin, said:

These are probably going to be more then sufficient for most users. Most software struggles to take advantage of 2 cores efficiently right now, let alone 4. These don't hold much interest for me though as I am a heavy multi-tasker and run some pretty processor intensive image editing programs. The Lower TDP is nice as well, but probably won't make much of a difference in desktop usage.

Did i miss something? I couldn't find where are they planing a 32nm quad core version of the Core i7 processors? Seems kind of odd. Maybe they are concerned about yield issues on the larger die?

TomSEA TomSEA, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

LOL...my first thought was the exact opposite of compdata's. Why are they straying from quad core?

Although agreed, software is in serious need of catching up to multi-core technology.

dummybait said:

not sure about u but, i'm tired of buying a new mobo everytime they change the socket... (which is quite often)

Guest said:

not sure about u but, i'm tired of buying a new mobo everytime they change the socket... (which is quite often)

Well, the LGA 775 socket has been around for about 5 years, and many, many boards & CPUs are still currently available. Is every 5 years what you consider, "every time they change the socket"?

IMHO, 5 years is almost an eternity in the computer industry. Things will probably stabilize around the (Intel) LGA 1156 for quite a while.

If we assume an Intel user, that's only 2 board styles in 5 plus plus years. The obsolescence problem isn't with the socket design, it's with the collateral hardware in the motherboard, and the lack of a viable BIOS update protocol to keep up with the different processor instruction sets.

ET3D, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Actually, new motherboards are required even without socket changes. LGA 775 may have been around for a while, but a modern 775 processor won't work with an old 775 motherboard.

Timonius Timonius said:

The real 'trick' is making the modern technology compatible with the older technology (ie put that new 775 cpu into an old 775 mobo but you'll only get the max performance rating from the mobo and not the cpu) and is this really a viable and cost effective option for the manufacturer?

saintbodhisatva said:

I've already made an order for my 1156 socket mobo, Im just worried that this becomes obsolete , earlier than the 1336 socket. I'd be spending roughly the same on costs. Im banking on 1156's mainstream appeal though to keep it afloat for quite a long time, by the time I do get the itch to upgrade, it would probably be a completely new architecture already. till then, bring on those processors, intel!

BlackIrish said:

ET3D said:

Actually, new motherboards are required even without socket changes. LGA 775 may have been around for a while, but a modern 775 processor won't work with an old 775 motherboard.

Correct :p

Plus, even if someone changes their computer on 5 or more years, there's nothing bad about it. Most people use their computers for basic tasks, and don't need to be brainwashed by commercials that they need new technology every 2 years in order to work better.

UT66 said:

meh... E6600 was balls. And then Intel drooped the ball. Power consumption of the chart, insane motherboard prices, needles memory upgrades, dumb and confusing names / upgrading paths, new nerfed platform with no future, no usb3, sata6, no real innovation. No sale.

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