Hitachi launches its first SSDs, with help from Intel

By on November 17, 2010, 9:45 PM
As expected, Hitachi Global Storage Technologies has announced its new Ultrastar brand of Solid State Drives (SSDs). The Ultrastar SSD400S family comes in 100GB, 200GB, and 400GB flavors. The latter can endure up to 35PB of random writes over the life of the drive, which is the equivalent of writing 19.2TB per day for five years.

The world's first jointly developed SAS and FC enterprise-class SSDs combine Hitachi's HDD expertise with Intel's 34nm single-level cell (SLC) NAND flash memory. Hitachi and Intel announced their plan to jointly work on enterprise-class SSDs in late 2008. The Ultrastar SSD400S family includes advanced data integrity and power loss management technologies to ensure compatibility in multi-tiered SSD/HDD system designs.

The new Ultrastar SSD400S family features both 2.5-inch 6Gbps Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) and 3.5-inch 4Gbps Fibre Channel (FC) interfaces. Ultrastar also has the industry's highest sequential throughput: up to 535MBps read and 500MBps write for 6Gbps SAS and 390MBps read and 340MBps write for 4Gbps FC. The new drive also delivers up to 46,000 read and 13,000 sustained write IOPS, reaching speeds 100 times faster than traditional HDDs.

"Hitachi's strategic investment and commitment in the enterprise market is evident with the new Ultrastar SSD family," Mike Cordano, Hitachi's executive vice president of worldwide sales and marketing, said in a statement. "Our new SSD product family not only symbolizes our market opportunity to serve evolving cloud data center infrastructures, but also delivers value to our customers in terms of increasing data center performance and reducing total cost of ownership. With qualifications now underway, we anticipate volume shipments to commence in the first half of 2011."





User Comments: 8

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Jibberish18 said:

Geeez. Well these seem impressive.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Just when you thought there was no point to SATA 3, they come up with these......

Leeky Leeky said:

Oh nice, bet they'll be rather expensive though!

But if they are anything like there own traditional hard drives they'll last ages and be reliable.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

But if they are anything like there own traditional hard drives they'll last ages and be reliable.

Not so for their VCRs.

Leeky Leeky said:

Not so for their VCRs.

I never used video cassettes, by the time I watched films on TV we were using DVDs - So I couldn't comment on them, but my experiences of mechanical discs, and reports I read online seem to offer positive feedback on reliability.

Though that said, I can't really say in any honesty I've found my Hitachi drive to be any more reliable than my WD, or Seagate for one simple reason - I've never had a single HDD fail on me, ever, yet. (touch wood)

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

I never used video cassettes, by the time I watched films on TV we were using DVDs - So I couldn't comment on them, but my experiences of mechanical discs, and reports I read online seem to offer positive feedback on reliability.

Nah man, I go way back, even before there were VCRs, or for that matter, audio cassettes!

A friend suggested that his employer had switched from Seagate / WD to Hitachi HDDs. Not sure how that worked out.

With that said, it seems a moot point about Hitachi SSD reliability, since if the article is correct, they'll be rebadged Intel. Or at least, Intel internals.

Talk about ancient history, I had one of the machines that used these original RCA HUGE audio cassettes.....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RCA_tape_cartridge and more on these..... [link]

Nima304 said:

Awesome. Another hard drive producer launches SSD, and in 400GB flavors? Prices are going to drop even further.

Leeky Leeky said:

@Capt.

Loving the massive audio cassette!

I remember the mega floppy 5 1/4" floppy discs! My old workplace had a couple laying around! Hard to think once upon a time they were the default way of storing files.

@Nima304;

I wouldn't bet on that too much, prices for SSD's are going to remain higher than most peoples budgets for a couple of years yet - Or until at least considerably larger sizes are offered and become mainstream.

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