Weekend Open Forum: Do you like your job?

By on March 2, 2012, 7:00 PM

It's hard enough to find a job in a slow economy, let alone one that you truly find enjoyable and fulfilling. But you have to make a living somehow. Thus often times people stay put in jobs that they don’t necessarily like, while others turn to self-employment, which can be as stressful when you struggle to make ends meet or several times more rewarding when you can make a living doing something you love.

Today we want to ask you: Do you like your job? Tell us a little bit about what you do. For the younger crowd still going through their studies, are you looking forward to a stable job that you like enough, regular income, and benefits, or will you take the road less traveled and venture in starting a project of your own?

Image courtesy of xkcd




User Comments: 67

Got something to say? Post a comment
Guest said:

I love what I do... it has been 20 years of fun!!! Can't see myself doing anything else... Finance.

TrueBooleanFals TrueBooleanFals said:

US Army - Reserves (88M - Motor Transport Operator) and Grounds Keeper for zoo.

Can't say I enjoy being a reservist, but it beats having to work three jobs to support my family. Hate being a grounds keeper. Glad I am deploying March 12th. I will be talking to a retention officer when I get back from deployment about going Active duty.

Guest said:

I'm a 17 year old Tech Writer for Kitguru and Android Mobile NZ; still looking for a "real-world" part time job but I'm not complaining!

ramonsterns said:

Guest said:

Wish I had a job to love/hate...

For truth.

If I apply for any generic job, I never get called back. If I apply for anything else, "not enough experience".

I live in the middle of nowhere with cities 12 miles from me or more, and I'm not spending a quarter of a tank just so I can "volunteer" my time and gas money.

EEatGDL said:

Hoping to get the job I want someday, still studying and trying to give my best at it.

Guest said:

I'm a senior computer science major in college. I plan to graduate this December. I have absolutely no idea what I'm going to do with my life.

Every job I look at says they want a guy with 5+ years experience or there's some kind of requirement that I know nothing about that I haven't been taught in college. 4 years ago I thought I was making a smart choice in picking Computer Science, but it looks like it may be difficult to find anything.

Xero07 said:

Just started at Intel and love it.

t3chn0vamp said:

I am a Solution Engineer and my job is to fix computers.not the hardware but software part.more like the troubleshooting.sometimes it seems frustrating cuz there are so many complicated issue with computer which takes hours to be fixed but at last its the part of this job.So I like it.

blimp01 said:

Same bro, I have a year left in my computer and network technician course and all jobs I see need tons of experience

Guest said:

I'm a software developer for a major aircraft manufacturer. Monday - Friday 7AM - 4PM. Great pay and great benefits. I love my job.

LNCPapa LNCPapa said:

Love my job - can't say it gives me a lot of room for growth, but it has a bit and is incredibly stable. I know that my employer isn't going anywhere tomorrow and I'm pretty good at what I do so I feel safe/comfortable where I'm at. I make enough to take care of my family and provide all the things they need and most of what they want so I can't complain.

Staff
Shawn Knight Shawn Knight said:

I play with hardware every day - what's not to love? heh

Justgivemeaname said:

I'm still in college working on my computer science degree. Working part time in a hospital kitchen to pay for it, and I hate it. You can only see so many naked old men while delivering dinner before your eyes start to bleed. Fortunately, I've made friends with the director of the IT department there so I should be able to get a real job working for him once I graduate.

Guest said:

I work in a semiconductor factory. 12 hour shifts days and night... This is the only thing I hate in my life - my job. There is no such thing as "career" or "growing" in such a job and perspectives are next to none. The hardest part is that you are surrounded by people who already "know everything" and have already achieved everything they could. But it's a dead end for me. I need space to grow... Sad:(((

penn919 said:

To put it simply, No. I'm working on it though.

Ghost410 said:

I'm probably older than most at 58. I've been in engineering since 1980. Lucky choice so long ago. It's been a good career but to be honest, I've never loved it. Some parts, yes, but in general, not really. Management or customers seem always to take whatever joy there is out of it. Still, it's better than most jobs and I'll be retiring in a year. I still recommend engineering/math/computer science with advanced degrees to those that can walk that path.

MarkHughes said:

Coder for a big 3D CAD company.. They let me loose most of the time to do as I please, And they pay me!!! Love my job (Its more a hobby than a job)

Sarcasm Sarcasm said:

Been 6 years in the semi-conductor industry. Hate it and love it at the same time. Looking forward to advancing to an Electrical Engineer or Electrical Technologist and perhaps one day land a job at Nvidia.

Sarcasm Sarcasm said:

Guest said:

I'm a senior computer science major in college. I plan to graduate this December. I have absolutely no idea what I'm going to do with my life.

Every job I look at says they want a guy with 5+ years experience or there's some kind of requirement that I know nothing about that I haven't been taught in college. 4 years ago I thought I was making a smart choice in picking Computer Science, but it looks like it may be difficult to find anything.

Once you finish, the key is to never give up looking regardless how long it might take. I say this because of experience with friends who's graduated with BS and Master degrees but end up staying job less because they give up. However, other friends who never let up have landed some pretty stout careers, some making $100,000 a year starting.

SalaSSin said:

Infrastructure manager for the Belgian part of a big European corporation. Have to say i love my job, tinkering around with SAN's, servers, now in a big consolidation project, loads of overtime, but can't say i don't enjoy it :-)

H3llion H3llion, TechSpot Paladin, said:

ramonsterns said:

Guest said:

Wish I had a job to love/hate...

For truth.

If I apply for any generic job, I never get called back. If I apply for anything else, "not enough experience".

I live in the middle of nowhere with cities 12 miles from me or more, and I'm not spending a quarter of a tank just so I can "volunteer" my time and gas money.

True that, I hate the "not enough experience" people ... Sure they try to get best for their jobs to minimize costs and maximize profit but you aren't helping the society. Shame money is driving this world, not progression.

Ithryl said:

Guest said:

I'm a senior computer science major in college. I plan to graduate this December. I have absolutely no idea what I'm going to do with my life.

Every job I look at says they want a guy with 5+ years experience or there's some kind of requirement that I know nothing about that I haven't been taught in college. 4 years ago I thought I was making a smart choice in picking Computer Science, but it looks like it may be difficult to find anything.

No reason to worry in my opinion. Although the fact that you do worry just shows that you care about your future job - which is good, of course. Anyways, it's better to expect your first job to be something 'not as good' as you'd like it to be - everyone has to start somewhere. There are exceptions, I admit, e.g., many programmers land a great job pretty soon - often during studies. Just keep looking, something will pop up eventually. + It's always good to start working, even if only part-time, during your studies.

Also, don't rely on college/university to teach you everything. From my experience, these institutions mainly just shape the way you think and the way you go on about solving things. The rest often has to be self-taught.

Guest said:

unemployed here, ~40yo, still living with my parents :)

if i could roll back 12 years of my life, i would have preferred working in a hospital as a medical technologist, or laboratory technician, or doctor.

Guest said:

I'm 27, i graduated 4 years ago as an economist in the faculty of IT and Eco. Since then I worked in a Bank in Eastern Europe (subsidiary of one of the biggest companies in the world). I started in IT development as a develepoer, then as a system analyst. I loved it.

Currently I'm in the Information Security department which love even more, though i struggle some extreme hard projects.

Salary is very good compared to local conditions, but are bad compared to western europe and US.

Expectations are high, i am overwhelmed with tasks, but I still love it as I'm developing rapidly and learning a lot from it.

Planning on going to the US soon for a couple of years to work in the field of Information Security.

My only advice to starters is to find the company that you want to work for and apply for any kind of position there. If you are already in it will be much easier to get better positions of your taste!!! ;-) And till you get your desired position you are still developing a better CV and gaining a lot of work experience.

Never be afraid, always be initiative and stick to your idealism!!!

Best luck for everyone,

Peter

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I work for a civil engineering consulting house which works in ME + Africa + SEA + ASEAN countries mostly in water resources, infrastructure development, and transportation engineering fields and like my job, well being in the management have its own advantages . But I have a feeling that what I could I have achieved with this job, but the problem is, I don't want another job with some other employer, so lately, I've been checking 'feasibility' of various business options, and if something interesting turns up, I will certainly look in to starting my own business

treetops treetops said:

I was working as a receptionist at a super 8 while going to college full time to earn my networking degree along with a associates in science. But the owner wouldn't pay me time and a half for overtime and cut my hours to one a day a week for asking so now I just go to college.

I plan to get a job repairing and maintaining computers for a office. That should be easy, in the mean time I will work on getting a higher paying job networking for a company. I may or may not go on to get my bachelors.

Guest said:

I am a police agent in Romania , i used to love doing my job ... then the laws changed and law breakers received more right's and benefit's then the police ever had ... now i hate my job. Just thinking about the fact that my training costed the state 200 dollars month and my salary is now 600 dollars a month and on an inmate at a medium level penitentiary the state spends over 1000 dollars a month . And while i spend over 6 month to convict a felon and gather sufficient evidence , a prosecutor let's him go in a week for either being his first crime or by commuting his incarceration to a measly 100 dollar fine.

Yes i HATE my job now.

Tekkaraiden Tekkaraiden said:

I repair fitness equipment for a living so I travel quite a bit. The job itself isn't too bad but having gone to school for electronics repair it doesn't really challenge me. Having to pay for all my expenses out of pocket isn't great either.

hitech0101 said:

I hate what i am learning at college.Pretty sure finding job difficult enough won't have a choice of choosing the one i like.

Guest said:

What job?!

Guest said:

I'm a manic depressive and I hate work anyway........................

MrAnderson said:

I like my Job. The people I work with make the difference.

Nicragomi said:

Slot Technician for Ceaser's Entertainment... not what I want to do, hopefully an opening in the IT Dept. will open up soon. I have my Associates in Cybercrime and Networking.

Guest said:

I'm an engineer at Samsung Telecom. I like the work, but the job sucks, it's not at all rewarding or satisfying, it's all about cliques and kissing up, not the job.

But it's a paycheck, so we stick around.

computergeek said:

I am video game programmer for a small game company but we are doing good now and we are going to expand so I love my job!

slh28 slh28, TechSpot Paladin, said:

It means I can buy new upgrades for my computer so yes, I do like my job

Glad I graduated just before the financial crisis though.

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Hated my job, then lost it, was out of work for a year, and went back to school.

A bit tough at my age, but never too late...

Raswan Raswan said:

Second-year doctoral student in History (of science, technology, and medicine, woot woot), making 12k a year, taking out 5k a year in loans. School work, teaching, and grading add up to around fifty hours a week, and the only advice every professor seems to know how to give is that there are no jobs in academia anymore. So I research, write papers, go to conferences, and write articles to get just so one day I can tell them to suck it. Wouldn't trade this for anything else right now (except the grading; kids are just getting dumber and dumber).

In fact, reading a 729-page book this very moment on WWII, by someone who convinced a publisher that his book, despite being the ten thousandth volume on WWII, is different and worth it. Keep on keepin' on...

SNGX1275 SNGX1275, TS Forces Special, said:

I work for a civil engineering consulting house which works in ME + Africa + SEA + ASEAN countries mostly in water resources, infrastructure development, and transportation engineering fields and like my job, well being in the management have its own advantages . But I have a feeling that what I could I have achieved with this job, but the problem is, I don't want another job with some other employer, so lately, I've been checking 'feasibility' of various business options, and if something interesting turns up, I will certainly look in to starting my own business

Well when you do that and need a geologist with a background in groundwater and environmental geochemistry, I'm your guy.

H3llion H3llion, TechSpot Paladin, said:

My only advice to starters is to find the company that you want to work for and apply for any kind of position there. If you are already in it will be much easier to get better positions of your taste!!! ;-) And till you get your desired position you are still developing a better CV and gaining a lot of work experience.

Never be afraid, always be initiative and stick to your idealism!!!

Best luck for everyone,

Peter

This is a very good advice Many people got their jobs that they love this way (heard few Bios from Blizzard and other big gaming corps, they did the same thing).

---agissi--- ---agissi---, TechSpot Paladin, said:

US Air Force and I love my job. There is plenty of room for growth, Im getting my degree while I earn a paycheck and gain hands on experience every day. I'm in the Water and Fuels Systems career field and our Community College Air Force degree that we're made to get is in Mechanical and Electrical Applied Sciences. We're required to maintain physical fitness so naturally I feel great, and I've learned that with persistence and hard dedicated effort anything can be achieved. My life has been turned around.

Guest said:

Anyone have tips for making a resume for a soon to graduate Computer Science major? What should you put if you have absolutely no experience? Programming languages you're familiar with? Certain specialized classes you've taken? I need all the help I can get lol

Guest said:

Man, I feel your pain, I remember my college boasted about job placement after school. HA, its only true if you stay in the area the professors have connections... not if you go home. So my challenge was the same, I actually drove around Buffalo and stopped at businesses looking to apply like I was trying to get a job at a fast food joint, it was pathetic, I stopped at one place and the guy said, "why don't you just start your own business?" So I did that, After getting a couple clients and some good references, I have never had a hard time getting a job since... in fact one time I was offered a job, I accepted it, then changed my mind and turned it down, Then a month later I changed my mind again and they offered me the job again. I still work there.

Major: Network Administration

If getting a BS tought me anything, it wasn't even technology related. it was "Do it right, do it well, Don't cut corners" The competition weeds itself out if you follow that rule.

Guest said:

Resume advice: Your resume is you ticket, I'm sure everyone says that but you just have to remember to make it clean, well organized and straight to the point. Your attention to detail is what stands out. Make things line up, minimize whitespace and for the love of god, don't misspell ANYTHING.

I have interviewed a lot of people, and you wouldn't believe how many ugly, sloppy resumes came across my desk. A poorly written resume tells me, "This guy can't write a one page document about himself, how will he organize himself and communicate information on projects that take 12 months to complete?"

Regardless of how easy it is to email a resume in PDF form... Snail mail it. Someone physically touches it that way. Use the fancy heavy paper; make an awesome cover letter that is only one page. Focus on how you understand business not how well you would sit in a cubicle and crank away at a program all day. At school you worked on many project in parallel, you worked as a team to complete pieces/parts. Again, your attention to detail in the words you choose to describe yourself will make you stand out... Like instead of saying I was the project manager on blah, blah, blah project... you could say something like.

"As the scope of the IT services are often more demanding than one person can handle alone, I have found myself able to appropriately delegate tasks, train technical team members and end users, along with provide direction to my team related to changing needs of the project and best practices. I take pride in the results of my efforts, this enables me to continually improve my strategy and grow my knowledge base as I progress down my career path."

That sounds a little better than "I was the project manager for a class project."

Oh yeah, If the job posting says, include a salary, do it that's called a requirement, they want a number, give them one.

Good luck

Jeff W.

Benny26 Benny26, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Couch potato? Loving it!

On a serious note, I'm not 'fully' employed at the moment, but i did enjoy my last full job very much.

Guest said:

Writing my USMLE Step 1 in 3 weeks, that will be fun. Lets hope I do well enough to pay off my 200k+ med school debt b4 I turn 50.

3DCGMODELER 3DCGMODELER said:

I love my Job, 3D Modeler Texture Artist, Animator for the Movie Industry, I Have no Bosses, I hate it when I have no one to scream at, but me.

Shouting maches against myself are usually pretty funny...

Alpha Gamer Alpha Gamer said:

I'm a teacher in Brazil. During college, I taught English at language schools to make ends meet. When I finally got my bachelor degree in Japanese Language and Literature, I started teaching not only Japanese, but also Portuguese to foreign people, especially to Japanese. In a overall manner, I like my job. But the feeling of teaching such different languages is mixed. Japanese is hard as hell, and the students have a really hard time trying to grasp something that, for the western mind, is considered a very ambiguous language. English, on the other side, is easier than my own native language and I have a lot of fun with the higher advanced students. Finally, teaching Portuguese to foreigners is the real challenge. Having to perceive your own mother togue as something artificial and so displaced from your core is no easy task and, definitely, sets a point of no return in your mind.

TomSEA TomSEA, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

I'm a 20-year military retiree. 6 years Navy as enlisted, 14 Army as an officer. Now I'm a Program Manager for a large government agency in Seattle. Have an office with a terrific view overlooking the entire Seattle waterfront - Space Needle, ferries, Mt. Rainier. I have the freedom to manage my projects in the way I feel should be done and all the resources I desire. Have a great boss that is supportive yet stays out of my way. In a nutshell, it's a great job and I'm grateful to have it.

Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.