Former Microsoft employee launches 'Fixing Windows 8' blog

By on March 14, 2012, 2:00 PM

A former Microsoft employee has launched a blog called ‘Fixing Windows 8’ that offers suggestions that he hopes the company will implement prior to releasing their next operating system. Simply put, Mike Bibik feels that new users won’t know how to navigate the interface primarily because Microsoft has hidden several features and menus from view.

The author suggests that power users should be able to figure out how to effectively use the mouse in Windows 8 but novice or new users will be completely lost. Furthermore he complains that Metro style apps don’t have window controls so there’s no obvious way to exit or minimize an app once inside.

To back up his claims, he has linked a YouTube video from Chris Pirillo. In the clip, Pirillo’s father can be seen trying to navigate from the Windows 8 desktop back to the Metro UI unsuccessfully. If this video is any indication, the average user is certainly going to have a tough time later this year when the final version ships.

But rather than totally bash Microsoft over the choices, Bibik hopes that his words will be seen as informative and eye-opening rather than overly-critical. He even offers up some suggestions to alleviate the glaring issues, such as combining the desktop task bar with the new Start screen, combining Charms and the master apps list into a single menu, adding a dedicated Charms bar and bringing back the Start button on the desktop.

Is Microsoft trying too hard to make Windows 8 a tablet OS and overlooking traditional desktop users?




User Comments: 62

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TomSEA TomSEA, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

"Is Microsoft trying too hard to make Windows 8 a tablet OS and overlooking traditional desktop users?"

That's exactly how I view it.

mario mario, Ex-TS Developer, said:

Watch the entire video, the last 10 seconds are totally worth it

chaboi390 said:

mario said:

Watch the entire video, the last 10 seconds are totally worth it

thanks, totally worth it haha!

Guest said:

I kinda like the Metro interface but like the video...There are a few things they should change before release...or many of us will be pulling a Vista and wait Till Windows 9 and the fixes comes out. I mean I had to google how to shut the thing down...really...that man clicks and its hidden? Shutdown should be on the main screen!!!

Staff
Matthew Matthew, TechSpot Staff, said:

Is Microsoft trying too hard to make Windows 8 a tablet OS and overlooking traditional desktop users?

I think "overlooking" is too strong of a word. To me, that implies Microsoft is completely ignoring the desktop aspect of Windows 8 and that's not true. Windows 8 is obviously trying very hard to be a valid operating system on two completely different platforms. That's no easy task and so I don't expect Microsoft's first attempt to be perfect. There will be problems. How the company addresses those issues is what matters most in my opinion.

If this video is any indication, the average user is certainly going to have a tough time later this year when the final version ships.

I don't think the video proves much of anything. Maybe it proves an old man might not find Metro as easy as he should be able to on his first attempt. That can be easily resolved. And even if it isn't, the "average user" we all love to downtalk doesn't need to access Metro and the desktop UI. They could probably comfortably browse the Web, check their email, check the weather and chat on IM in either interface without ever using the other.

Meanwhile, Windows 8 might not ship in an ideal state for experienced folks, but power users wouldn't be power users if they didn't tweak things to their liking. I can't think of a single desktop OS I've used where I didn't make changes to the usability, be it through registry hacks or third party software. Windows 8 will be no different in that respect. I think the only major argument in all this is whether Windows 8 will be worth upgrading to over 7.

Guest said:

If they can't find the shutdown button.Most users will just hit the power button to shutdown..Which isn't good a thing either.

But that video made a real good point though..

Guest said:

They need to trash the disaster that is the metro interface and start with a fresh canvas. There are many mockup UIs of Windows 8 that look simple yet spectacularly elegant.

The Fisher Price my-first-computer tile UI does not belong on a desktop computer. It does look good on a slate/tablet PC though.

Zen Zen, TechSpot Paladin, said:

To be honest, I've kind of given up the ghost on bad talking new up and coming Operating Systems. Simply put........"it's going to be, what it's going to be"! I don't plan to take Windows 8 out for even a test drive, for the days of Windows Vista put a sour taste in my mouth in regards to Vista and Vista looking Operating Systems, I just leave them alone now and since the early days of Vista I went back to what I know and love, might not work for some, most people love their "eye candy" now a days, but Windows XP Professional does everything I want and more!

I'm sticking with XP for the duration!

Timonius Timonius said:

mario said:

Watch the entire video, the last 10 seconds are totally worth it

Priceless! Maybe I should be focusing my IT studies towards that area

On the other hand here might be an opportune time to push free Linux OSes to the masses. Most Linux distros I've tried are pretty straightforward if you are an average user.

Guest said:

We secretly replaced this user's Desktop OS with a table OS, let's see if he notices the difference.

Guest said:

I think that instead of updating my windows 7 to version 8, I will make a downgrade to Windows XP x64!

Windows eXPerience is the best Windows in history!... no more... Period!

Guest said:

that should be Tablet OS...

Guest said:

Complete failure on MS's part. Metro is such a failed user interface for the desktop/laptop, it's not even funny. The OS was clearly designed for touch screen devices....how many desktop and laptop computers have a touch screen?

MS doesn't get it. We just spend $100+ on Windows 7. It works well. Why the **** would anyone want to upgrade in just 2 years when Windows XP lasted us almost 10 years. Windows 7 is good enough to last 5+. It has DX11 which is at most what next generation of consoles will use.

MS should have just refined Windows 7 and released Metro for tablets and smartphones and left the traditional desktop ALONE.

Guest said:

Yes, come on Microsoft make two versions like you always have. You're so constrained. There's only so far you can get as your developers only reflect a small portion of the global community. Listen to us we use it so we should be able to tell you what will work. You can ignore any "I don't like change statements" just take note of the "How can I do this" and "why down't we have that" statements

Guest said:

I can't even begin to tell you how accurately this portrays my experience. I thought to myelf...so THIS is what non-techs feel like when you shove a computer in front of them.

Looks like Microsoft is well on their way to fulfilling their OS Success-Fail-Success-Fail pattern with this Win8 operating system (aka XP, Vista, Win7, Win8) ...and I like Microsoft! yeesh! (They gotta fix that interface before release)

Lionvibez said:

Zen said:

To be honest, I've kind of given up the ghost on bad talking new up and coming Operating Systems. Simply put........"it's going to be, what it's going to be"! I don't plan to take Windows 8 out for even a test drive, for the days of Windows Vista put a sour taste in my mouth in regards to Vista and Vista looking Operating Systems, I just leave them alone now and since the early days of Vista I went back to what I know and love, might not work for some, most people love their "eye candy" now a days, but Windows XP Professional does everything I want and more!

I'm sticking with XP for the duration!

I feel for you bro.

But as they say ignorance is bliss.

Guest said:

Metro is a nice interface for both tablet AND desktop--or maybe I should say, it CAN be.

Having tried the CP, I know when I say that Metro is a disaster right now. It is way less flexible than the desktop when you can just position multiple windows next to each other in any way or fashion you like.

Stuff is hidden away where you don't expect it is another problem.

Multi-tasking with Metro is somewhat shrouded. We don't know what we can let Metro apps do in the background. Can we compile stuff, can we defrag stuff, can we just let apps load in the background, etc?

The final problem is that all Metro apps are too simplistic. They don't need to be. If they end up too simplistic, power users will just ignore them and the holy grail that is Metro will fail, which it must not do. Remember that Metro is not just a UI; it is based on the new WinRT platform, which will make it easier to develop consistent experiences and get rid of old nuisances such as extremely ugly UI, focusing stealing applications, noisy applications that pop up messages out of nowhere, and more.

NEVERTHELESS, it is pure foolishness to say an OS is bad when you haven't tested it. After you've tested it, you have the right to say so. XP isn't going to stay around forever, anyway, and good riddance--every XP computer out there puts all other computers at risk due to old buggy, insecure code.

So all the naysayers out there - go try it out, then come back complaining. Perhaps it might enlighten you and make you wiser in what is true and what isn't.

And let's hope Microsoft fixes Windows 8 before it ships.

Guest said:

The interface is FUBAR, not so much the FU but definitely the BAR (Beyond All Recognition for those that don't know what FUBAR stands for). It's a horrible idea to get rid of the Start button, that is the key to navigation on a PC for your average user as the dock is to OS X. Im certain people will be confused and hate this new interface because most will find it frustrating. The part that gets me is that it is removing the Start button is not necessary, you could have a button there that takes you back to the "boxes" without sacrificing the new style. I guess we'll see what happens when Windows 8 is officially released and pre-installed in all new PC's

gzt7d8 said:

TomSEA said:

"Is Microsoft trying too hard to make Windows 8 a tablet OS and overlooking traditional desktop users?"

That's exactly how I view it.

I totally agree with you! But, will the Blog make a difference...my opinion....no, I think they've made up their minds.

Guess I'll wait for Windows 9, I think Windows 7 has become the new Windows XP, where people love it and see no reason to move away.

gs

ikesmasher said:

The whole metro UI thing is annoying. It was cool at first because it seemed simple and elegant but now its just a headache. To many things moving around and its to complicated. This applies to xbox live and windows phone too.

Guest said:

ahh windows 8! it's like the tock of intel

psycros psycros said:

Its too bad Microsoft doesn't go the Linux route and just support different shells right out of the box. They could even have a logo program for the Stardocks of the world while the hackers could be happy with their fifty-eight users worldwide. As long as a Windows program ran on ANY "certified desktop", everyone could be happy. Of course, the most popular desktop probably be one that looks almost identical to XP, followed closely by a Mac-alike, but Microsoft would be smiling because it would move their product. Too bad their obsessed with copying the control freaks at Apple.

psycros psycros said:

Guest said:

Metro is a disaster right now. It is way less flexible than the desktop when you can just position multiple windows next to each other in any way or fashion you like.

Stuff is hidden away where you don't expect it is another problem.

Multi-tasking with Metro is somewhat shrouded. We don't know what we can let Metro apps do in the background. Can we compile stuff, can we defrag stuff, can we just let apps load in the background, etc?

The final problem is that all Metro apps are too simplistic. They don't need to be. If they end up too simplistic, power users will just ignore them and the holy grail that is Metro will fail, which it must not do. Remember that Metro is not just a UI; it is based on the new WinRT platform, which will make it easier to develop consistent experiences and get rid of old nuisances such as extremely ugly UI, focusing stealing applications, noisy applications that pop up messages out of nowhere, and more.

NEVERTHELESS, it is pure foolishness to say an OS is bad when you haven't tested it. After you've tested it, you have the right to say so. XP isn't going to stay around forever, anyway, and good riddance--every XP computer out there puts all other computers at risk due to old buggy, insecure code.

So all the naysayers out there - go try it out, then come back complaining. Perhaps it might enlighten you and make you wiser in what is true and what isn't.

And let's hope Microsoft fixes Windows 8 before it ships.

So, basically..you're saying that is sucks, which we already know, but don't take your world for it - find out how bad it sucks for yourself! Ooo-kaaay. Well, FYI the majority of us disparaging the POS that is Windows 8 <b>have</b> tried it for ourselves. The ones who haven't are probably Mac and Linux evangelists anyway. Oh, and that nonsense about XP's "insecure code" needs to be put to pasture. Slap a good security package on XP and its as safe as Windows 7 any day..because everyone disables UAC.

Guest said:

Well... ignorance runs amuck here...

No one said you had to get this, however it will need a quick tutorial for the people who aren't power users.

And I love how it isn't even the final version and people are hating on it already.....

Darth Shiv Darth Shiv said:

I think "overlooking" is too strong of a word. To me, that implies Microsoft is completely ignoring the desktop aspect of Windows 8 and that's not true. Windows 8 is obviously trying very hard to be a valid operating system on two completely different platforms. That's no easy task and so I don't expect Microsoft's first attempt to be perfect. There will be problems. How the company addresses those issues is what matters most in my opinion.

Why are they trying to do an OS GUI for both platforms when intrinsically, the input methods are so different?

Cota Cota said:

mario said:

Watch the entire video, the last 10 seconds are totally worth it

When should i go mow your lawn?

Guest said:

i would love windows 8 with older UI it simply just runs smooth.

Zen Zen, TechSpot Paladin, said:

NEVERTHELESS, it is pure foolishness to say an OS is bad when you haven't tested it. After you've tested it, you have the right to say so. XP isn't going to stay around forever, anyway, and good riddance--every XP computer out there puts all other computers at risk due to old and buggy.

Are you sure here, I think you've got your facts blown way out of per portion! Might I bring up a seldom talked about fact! Why is it at this very moment in time there are more Windows XP computers operating out there, than Windows Vista and Windows 7 put together? Why is it that most people who do choose to operate a Windows Vista or Windows 7 machine, why do most of those people make sure they have themselves a good copy of Windows XP on "stand by"? Why is it, and I'm talking right now, this moment, this date, that many computer hardware and software review companies say that "Windows XP is the most popular Microsoft Operating System, now and probably of all time!"

So please, don't come here and tell me or any other TechSpot member who choose to use Windows XP that it isn't going to last, like it's going to go away someday soon. I hate to break the bad news to you, but by the time Microsoft put's XP on the shelf for good, so much time will have gone by that support for Vista will have been long gone first. And what's this about XP putting other computers at risk? Where the heck have you been, what rock have you been hiding out under? XP a risk? You just go ahead and tell that to many Fortune 500 companies that use XP as their server backbone. Why don't you go ahead and tell that to the whole state of California, who's school districts choose to use Windows XP in about 70% of their classrooms, with the remaining 30% going to Apple products.

And about having to test drive an O.S. before coming in here and supposedly talking badly about it, if you read my original post in here, I said nothing bad at all, there was no bucket talking of any O.S. from me! Plus if that was pointed in my direction, who cares, so what if I don't want to test or use Windows 7 or Windows 8, I'll even say so what to my Widows XP, were are all entitled to use what we want to use, even if that Operating System originally released back on August 24, 2001.

"If it works, it works", regardless of the O.S.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

@Mathew

Pretty much spot on, we have been sharing our experiences with W8CP in another thread, and generally I think all of us (being power users) is able to find ways to live with it.

Personally I am damn pleased that Start button has disappeared, and I can simply type whatever I want to run, saves times and lots of clicks. So this simple one reason is compelling enough for me. However, it would be nice if MS adds a way to group these tiles, which may result in reducing clutter as well as need to continuously scroll right & left.

On the video, it does prove one thing, normal everyday user may end up spending some time to learn how to navigate his/her way around the new UI, but again, it shouldn't be that difficult.

Guest said:

Microsoft's philosophy of "One size fits all" (other then registry entries) is going to bite them hard if they chase both the desktop and mobile segments with this horrible mashup of traditional desktop and Metro interface.

It's not hard to put in code to detect the device capabilities (desktop monitor | phone display, mouse | touch sensor) and present the best UI for the device, with an option to swap at any time. Those with notebooks that can convert to tablet should expect exactly this kind of functionality, seamless switch between the familiar old desktop with start button, and Metro.

But they won't, because Ballmer is too stubborn.

Staff
Per Hansson Per Hansson, TS Server Guru, said:

Watching the full video indeed the last 10 seconds where worth it.

I don't even know if I want to give Windows 8 even a try, I simply don't understand Microsofts choice.

Why not make one "Windows 8 for Tablets" version and another regular version like "Windows 8 Professional"

Would that be too much to ask?

I mean the tablet interface is just crap if you don't have a touch monitor IMO

Guest said:

The website "fixingwindows8.com" doesn't seem to exist. It displays a blank page. And the URL for the specific blog post by Bibik serves up a 404.

Guest said:

Hahahahaha, that last comment was GOLD!

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I've never dealt with anything but Windows and this new Metro UI is a strong compelling reason to try other OS's. I have no intentions of giving this Metro interface a trial run. I find it a disgrace to my computer literacy skills. I'm not a kid, I didn't wake up yesterday to use a computer for the first time, I don't have a touch screen, why is Microsoft trying to treat me as such.

Such an OS might have a chance once touch screens are more wide spread. For now building an OS around such hardware is doomed to failure. Sure there are reason to have Metro interface and there is also reasons not to have this interface. I for one am not ready for this drastic change. I would love to support this new OS but if it doesn't support both touch screen and non-touch screen, my support will stay with Windows 7.

Guest said:

Microsoft should design windows 8 in such a way that users can change the setting to either completely desktop environment or metro environment and also still add feature from desktop environment to metro and vice versa

Guest said:

I'm an average user ad had a hard time navigating. I got pretty disgusted with how long it was taking me to find stuff so i thought, sod this, but then I couldn't find "shut down". What a crap interface. Totally not windows-user-friendly. No doubt an 8 yr old will love it.

Guest said:

Yep, it's crap, reminds me of the Vista debacle, or some of the Office "updates". How can MS get things so wrong ?

Guest said:

The last 10 seconds sums up my experience a few years ago. I was a hardcore PC user, i built them, used 3D modelling programs on them and never considered changing. Then when i wanted a new P, vista came out and thats when I had to make one of 3 choices:

1. stick with a 10 year old OS that works relatively well but looks dated and ****.

2. Use Vista which looks a bit less **** but is riddled with bugs and simply doesnt work.

3. Move to Mac OSX Leopard which is modern, looks amazing, has great usability, is super stable and has zero maintanence issues

Guess which choice I made?!

fimbles fimbles said:

I dont see any point in windows 8 at all, exept for tablet use.

Why do i need fancy pastel blocks when i can just right click any app and send it to desktop as a shortcut?

Why get rid of the start menu when it lists every program on your pc in an easy to find list, And if you dont like looking through the list, just type the name of the program in the start menu bar and hey presto!

Why hide settings and shut down options in over complicated hidden menus?

Windows vista was ripped to pieces due to people trying to install it on machines that did not have the cahones to run it. On a good pc it runs perfectly.

Windows xp is still great, but lack of dx11 somewhat limits it if you are a gamer like me.

Stick with windows 7 or vista if you have the pc to handle it.

MilwaukeeMike said:

One person does not make a for a realistic sample. I could show you a video of Snooki driving to prove that a car is too hard to operate.

They should put window controls on apps though, even if they're hidden until the mouse is nearby.

yukka, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Its simple, they should have an option to use metro or the traditional start menu or a combination of both with options for what you want the windows key to do if pressed.

the whole hot corner thing needs a tutorial for new users with arrows demonstrating the method of use. In fact the whole metro interface could use that. A tutorial video or interactive tutorial that takes over the desktop/metro etc and shows you how everything works.

But MS are trying to force everyone to try out the tablet ui on the desktop and its just going to piss people off - it already has in most cases. At least there is a utility that puts the start menu back, I already did that and now I look at Win8 and think "Why would i want to use this over Windows 7". Certainly being able to browse inside ISO files is nice and the taskbar stretches across multiple monitors. Apart from that?

TJGeezer said:

Guest said:

Windows eXPerience is the best Windows in history!... no more... Period!

Nah, I'd have to give that one to Windows 7: More stable, just as easily tweaked, doesn't overload the mid-curve, well debugged hardware I prefer. As for Win 8, the preview doesn't want to install easily in an Oracle VM on my machine and I'm not all that eager, so I'll just wait to see if it flies for power users, like 7, or if it falls like a Vista-wrapped brick.

Guest said:

Yeah, clearly not fake at all...

Lionvibez said:

psycros said:

Guest said:

Metro is a disaster right now. It is way less flexible than the desktop when you can just position multiple windows next to each other in any way or fashion you like.

Stuff is hidden away where you don't expect it is another problem.

Multi-tasking with Metro is somewhat shrouded. We don't know what we can let Metro apps do in the background. Can we compile stuff, can we defrag stuff, can we just let apps load in the background, etc?

The final problem is that all Metro apps are too simplistic. They don't need to be. If they end up too simplistic, power users will just ignore them and the holy grail that is Metro will fail, which it must not do. Remember that Metro is not just a UI; it is based on the new WinRT platform, which will make it easier to develop consistent experiences and get rid of old nuisances such as extremely ugly UI, focusing stealing applications, noisy applications that pop up messages out of nowhere, and more.

NEVERTHELESS, it is pure foolishness to say an OS is bad when you haven't tested it. After you've tested it, you have the right to say so. XP isn't going to stay around forever, anyway, and good riddance--every XP computer out there puts all other computers at risk due to old buggy, insecure code.

So all the naysayers out there - go try it out, then come back complaining. Perhaps it might enlighten you and make you wiser in what is true and what isn't.

And let's hope Microsoft fixes Windows 8 before it ships.

So, basically..you're saying that is sucks, which we already know, but don't take your world for it - find out how bad it sucks for yourself! Ooo-kaaay. Well, FYI the majority of us disparaging the POS that is Windows 8 <b>have</b> tried it for ourselves. The ones who haven't are probably Mac and Linux evangelists anyway. Oh, and that nonsense about XP's "insecure code" needs to be put to pasture. Slap a good security package on XP and its as safe as Windows 7 any day..because everyone disables UAC.

I don't disabled UAC and i'm an advanced user. Infact I have push the slider back up to the Vista levels of UAC.

Having that alittle extra protection there is good incase something slips by me and I haven't had a virus in years but better to be safe than sorry.

Lionvibez said:

Zen said:

NEVERTHELESS, it is pure foolishness to say an OS is bad when you haven't tested it. After you've tested it, you have the right to say so. XP isn't going to stay around forever, anyway, and good riddance--every XP computer out there puts all other computers at risk due to old and buggy.

Are you sure here, I think you've got your facts blown way out of per portion! Might I bring up a seldom talked about fact! Why is it at this very moment in time there are more Windows XP computers operating out there, than Windows Vista and Windows 7 put together? Why is it that most people who do choose to operate a Windows Vista or Windows 7 machine, why do most of those people make sure they have themselves a good copy of Windows XP on "stand by"? Why is it, and I'm talking right now, this moment, this date, that many computer hardware and software review companies say that "Windows XP is the most popular Microsoft Operating System, now and probably of all time!"

So please, don't come here and tell me or any other TechSpot member who choose to use Windows XP that it isn't going to last, like it's going to go away someday soon. I hate to break the bad news to you, but by the time Microsoft put's XP on the shelf for good, so much time will have gone by that support for Vista will have been long gone first. And what's this about XP putting other computers at risk? Where the heck have you been, what rock have you been hiding out under? XP a risk? You just go ahead and tell that to many Fortune 500 companies that use XP as their server backbone. Why don't you go ahead and tell that to the whole state of California, who's school districts choose to use Windows XP in about 70% of their classrooms, with the remaining 30% going to Apple products.

And about having to test drive an O.S. before coming in here and supposedly talking badly about it, if you read my original post in here, I said nothing bad at all, there was no bucket talking of any O.S. from me! Plus if that was pointed in my direction, who cares, so what if I don't want to test or use Windows 7 or Windows 8, I'll even say so what to my Widows XP, were are all entitled to use what we want to use, even if that Operating System originally released back on August 24, 2001.

"If it works, it works", regardless of the O.S.

There is a difference between running XP in a corporate environment where everything is locked down and users aren't logged in as admin. This I would trust, but in the hands of a noob at home XP is a disaster waiting to happen. I would rather use a OSX than go back to XP.

killeriii said:

Sigh.....

Another Windows OS to skip.

I don't get it. Is it really that hard for a multi-billion dollar software company to get it right the first time?

I understand the need for Metro, but i want it to work seamlessly.

And i want more:

Native multiple desktops done right. An upgrade to NTFS that adds current features and advances (DRM is not a feature). Now that everyone has a multi-core proc, make it easier to assign programs to cores.

i could go on.

If Microsoft finds features like these too difficult, maybe they should hire some of the Linux community.

Zen Zen, TechSpot Paladin, said:

There is a difference between running XP in a corporate environment where everything is locked down and users aren't logged in as admin. This I would trust, but in the hands of a noob at home XP is a disaster waiting to happen. I would rather use a OSX than go back to XP.

I see what your saying here and for the most part agree with your statements. XP in a cold room, in the basement of a million dollar company is locked down and up pretty tight, it's secure. Yes, XP or pretty much any Operating System out there which isn't as well secure as a corporation's version could be a Operating System asking for trouble. And yes, the average common everyday "noob", given a chance to sit and point and click their way through XP could be problematic at best. But there again an Operating System is only as "weak" or "strong" as the user sitting in front of it. For me my Operating System is a mega monster and is strong as hell, but that's only because once upon a time I gave a damn and choose to get a Computer Science degree and got Microsoft Certified in the Windows 2000 Server, Advanced Server and Windows 2000 Professional system platforms. XP being the child of 2000 Pro is just about the same in every regard, and is why I'm a loyal "fanboy" of it, it's what I know, so that's why I choose to stick with it, minus at the time the big deal that people made about XP being to much "eye candy", lame duck there, eye candy, look at systems of today and tell me XP is loaded with visual goodies........"not"!

It's all about choice, it's all about preference, and the bottom line.......it's all about what works for the individual. Let's just all be happy that we have a choice, what could be worse, what.....everyone out there could be stuck with Windows Millennium Edition.

3DCGMODELER 3DCGMODELER said:

thats right on the point...

i would of felt the same way...

I will stay with windows 98

hehehe

tipstir tipstir, TS Ambassador, said:

Yes Windows Metro 8 being pushed into the tablet market. If you want to run this on your desktop best get a touch screen monitor touch screen all-in-one PC. They can't get talking to your computer to smooth out yet. Android Assistant you can say" open gmail" and if it works she'll open it up. She might say she can't understand you. So now we can use our fingers to touch the screen to move things around and now Windows 8 will allow us to do more. Hopefully Microsoft has ironed out the bugs but like with their track record they wont! Once back in 1998 one of their VP for this region told me "everyone is a beta tester for our software and they don't even know it!"

Guest said:

Here's an option MS never considered. Stop making OSs. Linux/Unix are so much better. Firefox can do the browser. There's no need for MS at all anymore!!

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