Google Glass app uses 'fashion fingerprint' to indentify individuals

By on March 8, 2013, 2:00 PM

A new project being developed for Google Glass aims to identify people based on the clothing and accessories they wear. Once a familiar person has been spotted in the crowd, Glass will then overlay their name above them on the display like you’d see in a video game.

The project, partially funded by Google, was recently showcased at the HotMobile technology conference in Jekyll Island, Georgia. It is designed to help people find friends or family in large, crowded areas like airports, sports stadiums and shopping malls.

InSight developer Srihari Nelakuditi at the University of South Carolina in Columbia said they couldn’t use facial recognition as it would be unlikely that the person you are trying to find is looking directly at the visor’s camera. Instead, they developed a program that uses a “fashion fingerprint” of the clothes and accessories someone is wearing to help spot them later on.

This digital fashion fingerprint is built using a smartphone app that snaps a series of pictures of a particular individual. These photos are then used to create a file called a spatiogram that captures spatial distribution of colors, patterns and textures of the clothing the subject has on. Early testing using 15 volunteers found the system was able to locate the target 93 percent of the time.

Because the system profiles clothing and accessories instead of human faces, it’s said to protect peoples' privacy as the fingerprint changes every time a person changes their clothes.




User Comments: 7

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2 people like this | Guest said:

Big Brother is finally here and its us.

coppersloane coppersloane said:

This is so wrong on multiple levels.

MilwaukeeMike said:

Big Brother is finally here and its us.

That's an oxymoron.

It'd be pretty funny to see this thing get all confused at a sporting even where everyone wears the same colors.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

It'd be pretty funny to see this thing get all confused at a sporting even where everyone wears the same colors.
Oh, I'm pretty sure they would / could confirm the sighting with "good old fashioned" facial recognition software.

As for this being an oxymoron:

Big Brother is finally here and its us.

I'd venture to say it was intended to be, and a pretty darn good one at that.

HiDDeNMisT HiDDeNMisT said:

This is going to be funny to use. I expect that this will not be a good thing for the glasses. There trying to do to much with it.

MilwaukeeMike said:

I'd venture to say it was intended to be, and a pretty darn good one at that.

(Even though arguing semantics is a bit ridiculous)

It doesn't make any sense then. To say we are all 'Big Brother' means nothing. Everyone having the ability to see everything isn't 'Big brother' it's just extreme transparency. You could say his comment was ironic maybe.

It's like the saying everyone is a winner. Well... not at the same thing, that's impossible. If everyone is the same then no one is ahead. The whole premise of Big Brother is a single entity watching the masses.

Anyway, you give a lot of credit to a guest comment. I know you've been around long enough for that to be a stretch.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

It doesn't make any sense then. To say we are all 'Big Brother' means nothing. Everyone having the ability to see everything isn't 'Big brother' it's just extreme transparency. You could say his comment was ironic maybe.
Take break from "power computing" if you will, and have at this Wiki page about "syllogism" :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syllogism

It's like the saying everyone is a winner. Well... not at the same thing, that's impossible. If everyone is the same then no one is ahead. The whole premise of Big Brother is a single entity watching the masses.
Not an oxymoron? OK, let's make a syllogism out of our guests observation. Big brother is watching everybody. Everybody is watching everybody. Therefore, everybody is "Big Brother".

Anyway, you give a lot of credit to a guest comment. I know you've been around long enough for that to be a stretch.
You're correct, this is my seventh year here. I've also adopted a more managerial acceptance of guest posts, which has a democratic nature. "We know we're going to get 19 out of 20 useless posts from guests, but we still allow them so as not to deny the one that might carry a topic forward, add useful information, etc.".

So, I judge every post on how it resonates with me, from member and guest alike. Annoying, funny, worth arguing with, better left ignored, all on a case by case basis, regardless of originator..

Anyway, it's interesting that you chose to zero in on my post, only where it seems to disagree with you. I also mentioned the idea of backing up this "glass nonsense", with facial recognition software. Now there's the potential of massive abuse, and the all too real possibility of a "Big Brother" paradigm afoot.

Some thing else I do, is offer the courtesy to member and guest alike, of proofreading my posts, before, during the course of, and after posting.

So, you can imagine how this recent sampling of literary gems, flies with me:

...[ ]...all confused at a sporting even where everyone wears the same colors.

This is going to be funny to use. I expect that this will not be a good thing for the glasses. There trying to do to much with it.

It's like the saying everyone is a winner. Well... not at the same thing, that's impossible. If everyone is the same then no one is ahead.

So, while "arguing semantics", is what it is, and I may just be an mean, old , "grammar Nazi" at heart, I get sick of reading material that I have to supply the correct text, context, spelling, and usage to the words I'm reading.

No harm, no foul though, I suppose. As you mentioned, I've been doing it for years and years.

"There, their, they're", deal with it.

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