Australian consumer group issues court order forcing Apple to offer 24-month product warranties

By on December 18, 2013, 5:00 PM
apple, australia, warranty, accc, australian competition and consumer commission, australian, returns, replacements, repairs

Apple has had its fair share of run-ins with competition regulators regarding product warranties and things of that nature over the years, and it looks as though the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is the next to take issue with the company.

Based on claims that Apple was misleading consumers with respect to the details of faulty product replacement, refund and repair, the ACCC slapped the company with a court order demanding changes be made in Australia.

The group claims that Apple employees have been using its own internal warranty policies -- 14-day returns and 12-month manufacturer warranties -- instead of those put in place by Australian law. 

Much like last year when Apple succumb to the ACCC to the tune of $2 million for misleading info regarding 4G functionality on its new iPad, the competition watchdog group said that Apple has agreed to implement the Australian regulated warranty policy. According to reports, Apple will not only be changing its policies moving forward, but is also responsible for compensating affected consumers dating back two years.

It will offer customers a minimum of 24 months coverage and bring its repair and return policy up to local standards. For more info, Apple has put up a page outlining the various differences between its policy and those of Australian consumer law on its website.




User Comments: 7

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St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

One of the benefits of Australia - we have great consumer laws. Can be a pain to enforce sometimes, and I'm actually surprised that Apple let them push around like this.

Darth Shiv Darth Shiv said:

Well there was nothing stopping a knowledgable consumer from sending a rocket up them before *because* the of ACL protections. What Apple was doing was stating to unknowledgable customers their own T&C which aren't legally binding. So technically they aren't forcing Apple to offer 24 month warranty as you could cite ACL if you knew about it and get the 24 months protection already. They are just forcing Apple to be upfront that you actually have that right.

And yes this is from personal experience - when confronted with consumer law, shop operators tend to buckle very quickly.

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

It's the same in Europe, there is a law stating products purchased in Europe are required to have a 24 month warranty, yet most shops in the UK will only say you have one year, argue a bit and state the law in question they change their tune pretty quickly xD

gamoniac said:

The freedom of capitalism at work [sarcasm/]

1 person liked this | Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

One of the benefits of Australia - we have great consumer laws. Can be a pain to enforce sometimes, and I'm actually surprised that Apple let them push around like this.

"One of the benefits of Australia - we have great consumer laws".

And a half decent cricket team. Congrats on reclaiming the Ashes.

tonylukac said:

Have these people ever heard of credit cards? They must be bohemian like me. Credit cards give you a 2 year guarantee, if not 3 year.

St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

Have these people ever heard of credit cards? They must be bohemian like me. Credit cards give you a 2 year guarantee, if not 3 year.

You forget that people are generally stupid.

Our ccards range is something like this: Entry, Basic, Rewards, Gold, Platinum, Diamond.

Only the top three levels have +1 yr warranty on purchases.

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