Three in five US households with broadband also own a connected TV

By on February 14, 2014, 4:30 PM
internet, roku, broadband, smart tv, chromecast, connected tv

A new report from TDG Research suggests that if you have a broadband connection but don’t own an Internet-connected television, you’re now part of the minority. A full 63 percent of all US broadband households now own such a device which is up from 53 percent a year ago although there’s more to the report than first meets the eye.

Like I did, you might be thinking that an Internet-connected television is just another name for a Smart TV but you’d be wrong. The report, titled Benchmarking the Connected Consumer, defines a connected television as a Smart TV or a regular television connected to an Internet-enabled device like a Roku, Chromecast, connected Blu-ray player or even a game console.

The report also found that in homes with a connected television, 42 percent also had a second connected set.

It goes without saying that as net-connected televisions continue to penetrate the market, services like Netflix and Hulu will see increased subscribers. Conversely, this means that viewers will probably have less time to consume traditional broadcast television.

Do you have a web-connected television, either in the traditional sense of a Smart TV or TDG’s broader definition? I’ve yet to hop on the Smart TV train partially because I haven’t been in the market for a new TV in several years and also because I can access Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime and other services through a game console just as easily.




User Comments: 8

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9Nails, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Yay! I count as a minority. I wonder if I can get free cable for my clearly disadvantaged status?

Guest said:

I have no need or interest for a connected television. I have other devices capable of doing the same thing and more that will connect to my TV with little effort.

gibbstar gibbstar said:

All my TV's are connected to the internet via Roku on the main set or BluRay player in the bedrooms. The smart TV that my gf's room mate had was ok, but integrating this system into a tv is still fairly new tech, and as a result I've seen some issues. This is the same with all new tech, however, and I'm sure it will improve in the future. For now, you can move up a few inches bigger on your set and skip the 'smart' option and just stream via your bluray or Roku.

My last room mate was one of those people who had to have all the channels on cable, and so his bill was over $200/mo for comcast. I have access to far more movies, tv shows, etc and I only pay $9/mo for netflix, $79/yr for amazon prime, and then about $3/rental when I wanna see something that just came out via Vudu. WAY cheaper than traditional cable and no commercials for the most part.

Railman said:

I have no need or interest for a connected television. I have other devices capable of doing the same thing and more that will connect to my TV with little effort.

The headline in the article is misleading. It should have read TV that are connected to the web in one form or another. Under that definition I have had connected TV for a number of years via a Nintendo Wii. In fact the main use of the Wii is BBC iPlayer.

Guest said:

I hope this puts more pressure on cable/satellite companies. Unless they make some great changes (a la carte channels for example), I won't be returning to them. Long live Netflix/Hulu!

richalone442 said:

I bet most of the Smart TVs out there are never connected to the web, or connected, but never used, TVs for the most part are still used to watch broadcast/cable,direct TV/Dish programming, and gaming on consoles, and watch movies from DVD and Blu-Ray players

Kibaruk Kibaruk, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I had no faith in "smart" tvs, that was until my parents gifted me one.

Couldn't complain of a single thing, sometimes I want to watch a movie without turning on the computer and I just plug in the hard drive to the tv, or stream from my phone through wifi, or connect netflix directly to the tv, hulu and stuff like that.

Probably something I could've lived without but since it was a gift it's a nice improvement.

Railman said:

I had no faith in "smart" tvs, that was until my parents gifted me one.

Couldn't complain of a single thing, sometimes I want to watch a movie without turning on the computer and I just plug in the hard drive to the tv, or stream from my phone through wifi, or connect netflix directly to the tv, hulu and stuff like that.

Probably something I could've lived without but since it was a gift it's a nice improvement.

If it is a choice between a TV screen or PC monitor I prefer the TV. Ironically a survey in the UK has concluded we are watching more on TV but the majority of online TV viewing is catchup TV. The two programs at the top of the list were Sherlock and Doctor Who.

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