Computer shuts down, gives me message "System shut down due to Computer overclocking"

By Aquilon
Jul 5, 2005
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  1. I'm not quite sure what to do. Let me back up a bit, though. I originally got the new computer last December, so I went on a game-buying spree. I picked up some goodies like Jedi Academy, Doom 3, Far Cry, Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow, Knight of the Old Republic, etc. One day while playing Far Cry, the computer just shut down on me. Black screen, and I couldn't do anything. I thought it might be a glich in the game since I had forgotten to get the update patch. I installed the patch, but had the same problem. Soon after I was having the same problem with Splinter Cell and pretty much anything graphic-intensive. However, I was playing the original Tribes at the time when I first got that message above (it came through my speakers). Also, my computer has been significantly louder since the first "blackout" occurred. It sounds like the fan is working over time right from when I start up. It used to be really quiet. Anyways, any thoughts on this? Specs are in my profile.
  2. Rik

    Rik Banned Posts: 4,985

    Sounds like it could be heat causing the problem. First of all, open up the pc and get rid of all dust. I wouldnt vacuum it if i were u but instead buy a cheap paintbrush and use that to brush it all out and be as thorough as is humanly possible. Doing this alone can somtimes cure the problem.
  3. Aquilon

    Aquilon Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    I should also mention that I have updated my drivers.
  4. Vigilante

    Vigilante TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,120

    Go into the BIOS and watch the temperatures and voltages and see what is going on. The CPU should be below 130f and the case temp even lower. Big fans should be spinning around 2000rpm and small fans as much as 5000-7000.

    Get the dust out, even a small compressor (psi down to below 50 output) can get it out. With the sides off, watch it and see that the fans all work good. You can gently touch the metal of the heatsinks and get an idea if it's to hot to touch, it's to hot! Especially the heatsink on your video card.

    Noise in a case is almost always fans. Some unfortunate times it can be a hard drive.

    Along with updated drivers, update Windows too and latest DirectX9.

    cheers
  5. Aquilon

    Aquilon Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    Now, would it be alright to use like, a blow-dryer or small vacuum cleaner for it? What about products like Dust-Off?
  6. IronDuke

    IronDuke Newcomer, in training Posts: 1,267

    Something like dust off would be best. Also if you can take the box outside when you blow it have a vacuum cleaner running and blow the dust towards it. This will means that the dust is not returned in the first couple of days. Seeing that it is only six months old if it is a heat problem consider a more efficient heatsink and/or fan.
  7. Vigilante

    Vigilante TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,120

    Once you know it's clean, make sure all the plugs in there are tight, you may even want to pull them out and push back in again. Basically reseat them.

    To test the heat theory, just leave the side off and put a desk fan blowing on it as you use it.
  8. Rik

    Rik Banned Posts: 4,985

    Upon further pondering, it could be a fried graphics card, ive had that prob in the past and fitted a bay cooler by it and that cured it.
  9. Aquilon

    Aquilon Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    How would I know if it's a fried graphics card? That was actually my original thoughts, since it first occurred while playing Far Cry on high settings. Also, I checked my temps with AIDA32 and got

    Motherboard: 43 ºC (109 ºF)
    CPU: 56 ºC (135 ºF)
    Aux: Fluxuates between 27 ºC (81 ºF) and 56 ºC (133 ºF)

    CPU fan: 4754 RPM
  10. Rik

    Rik Banned Posts: 4,985

    Those temps are ok but a little on the high side, one part of the pc can easily heat up the rest so it can be difficult to find a hotspot. U could try running it with the case off and with as much cool air as possible to see if it makes any difference. The only real way to find out if the graphics card is fried is to test it in another pc or try another graphics card.
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