Dojo monitors your connected smart home for suspicious activity

By Shawn Knight
Nov 20, 2015
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  1. Smart home gadgets – thermostats, door locks, light bulbs, power monitors, security cameras, smart TVs and so on – afford a level of convenience (some would say laziness) that more and more people are finding worthwhile. As connected devices, they also introduce yet another potential entry point for cyber attacks which, depending on how security-conscious (or paranoid) you are, may or may not be a major concern.

    For those that’d rather be safe than sorry, a new security device from Dojo-Labs may be in order.

    The Dojo monitors the metadata of all the traffic on your home network. Assuming you’re ok with letting it have that level of access, it more or less serves as a watchdog over your network. It collects and sends device activity metadata to the startup’s cloud platform where it’s analyzed using proprietary statistical technology and mathematical models alongside machine learning algorithms.

    In other words, it monitors your network for suspicious behavior. And because it’s constantly monitoring, it gets smarter over time, creating more accurate usage data from connected devices and how they’re used.

    Dojo-Labs CEO Yossi Atias told TechCrunch that the device analyzes the data streams, not the data itself, so they’re only looking at the metadata related to the device themselves in terms of how they behave. So, that smart TV that’s eavesdropping on you? Yeah, it’ll detect that.

    When something catches its attention, the Dojo companion box will alert users via color-coded LEDs. There’s also the option to have a notification pushed to your smartphone although understandably, not everyone is keen on the idea of even more mobile notifications. Perhaps enabling notifications only when you’re away from home would be the ideal use case for some.

    The Dojo will set you back $99 during the pre-order period which includes a one year subscription to the cloud monitoring service (it’ll work without the subscription service albeit with fewer functions). Look for it to ship next March.

    Permalink to story.

  2. misor

    misor TS Evangelist Posts: 1,157   +195

    why use the 'cloud' ? the manufacturer should have designed the device to connect to whatever allowed wifi device and not thru the 'cloud' and not set as limited feature without the subscription service...

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