Here's what Microsoft charges the FBI to access customer data

By Shawn Knight
Mar 21, 2014
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  1. A collection of e-mails and invoices obtained by the Syrian Electronic Army claims to show how much Microsoft charges a secret division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to legally collect and view information about its customers.

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  2. VitalyT

    VitalyT TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 1,662   +508

    This is how your privacy takes up a big one.

    But on another hand, if MS didn't hand it out, they would subpoena MS instead, which would turn into a nightmare for the company - 5,620 subpoenas a month :)

    Evil begets evil :)
  3. insect

    insect TechSpot Booster Posts: 195   +49

    "there’s nothing unusual here as under US law, companies can request reimbursement for costs associated with complying with valid legal orders"

    That's the key everyone skips over. The FBI can only get data (legally, and only legally obtained evidence can be used in trial) if they have a valid order from a judge. If judges are just handing these things out willy-nilly without evidence that someone is suspect then that's a judiciary problem. The article attempts to paint MS as a "bad guy", image and all, but they are just doing what is legally required of them. This is no different from a cop showing up at your door with a warrant - you have to let them search anything listed in the warrant. If you have a problem with the warrant, then you have to take it up with the judge that signed it which often can't be done at the time the cop is standing at your door.
    spectrenad and MilwaukeeMike like this.
  4. So, basically, one could establish a free email or chat company, and live off the revenue generated by opening private info to secret services and investigation agencies. I mean, 3mln per year is not a bad income!
  5. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 5,818   +1,431

    This is a small example of how your tax dollars are being wastefully spent!
    spencer likes this.
  6. MilwaukeeMike

    MilwaukeeMike TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 2,049   +699

    Actually, catching bad guys is one of the few ways I'd say my tax dollars aren't being wasted. If you mean it'd be nice if it were cheaper, that's true. You'd like to think that MS would be interested in helping authorities whenever they could. It's not like they need the cost to be a deterrent to making a ton of requests because they need a warrant to get the data. The process of getting a warrant would keep the number of requests from getting too high.

    I understand MS has a right to be compensated for the time they take in fulfilling these requests, but it seems like a lot of money. I'd bet the process is pretty streamlined and it's not much work for them.
  7. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 5,818   +1,431

    And that is what I don't believe! Which is why I consider it a waste. And if you think I believe it cost that much to get the job done (that is if they are getting it done) you are wrong.
  8. spencer

    spencer TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 204   +22

    CALLED IT, they should pay me for using their os. It's not like microsoft had a choice though if they said no then the DHS would arrest the owners for some sort of ridiculous charge and then make the company do so anyway.
  9. Camikazi

    Camikazi TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 333   +56

    Hmmm, interesting idea... on a completely different note I think I might be setting up a email service, you know just to try it out :)
  10. Raoul Duke

    Raoul Duke TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 301   +81

    I take this as proof as to why Google is implementing security, they want to sell the data not have the NSA/FBI take it.
    treetops likes this.


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