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By mstpaintball
Jun 23, 2007
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  1. So is this too hot?
    [​IMG]

    ....this is after the system had been pretty much idle for about 20 minutes.

    Could this be why my Computer keeps crashing?, and games keep freezing?

    I opened my case, and stuck my hand down by the exhaust from my video card, and it feels like its almost going to burn me.
    Had no idea my CPU was also that hot.
     
  2. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    Yes, way too hot. 94 centigrade is awful hot, as they say, if accurate... and so are 74 C and 77 C in my opinion.

    I would not run it like that, until you know the story. Check your cpu fan speed and cooling vents, but don't run it until you know why that is happening.
     
  3. immafridge

    immafridge TS Rookie

    Woah, that is hot, a little more and you could make yourself a cup of tea with that CPU of yours!

    Anyways, it is obviously because of the heat that makes your game and system crash.
    Would love to help, but we need a little bit more details of this situation.
     
  4. mstpaintball

    mstpaintball TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 88

    Setup:
    Windows XP Home
    E6600
    GIGABYTE GA-965P-DQ6
    G.SKILL 2GB DDR2 800
    Seagate Barracuda 320gb 7200rpm SATA
    XFX nVidia GeForce 7950GX2 1GB 520 Version
    NZXT Lexa Case

    Its weird, I adjusted some fan settings (I think that maybe they may have reset from a bios update) and the CPU is now maxing out at about 60c under load with World Of Warcraft, but my Video Card is still very hot. On the 7950GX2 there are 2 boards for the card, and one GPU is much hotter than the other.
    I don't have a screen shot of it on Everest at the moment, but GPU 1 was at about 80*c while, GPU 2 was at about 92*c after about 10 minutes of World of Warcraft, and the CPU was only at about 60*c.

    Another problem, is if I leave my computer off over night, and try to boot it up in the morning, I will turn it on, it will then turn back off (own its own), turn back on (on its own) and I won't have a display. I have to keep turning it back on and off, until it just boots up once to get a display. I have video of it I'll post up in a bit.
    It sucks, because it can take like 15-20 minutes of turning it off and on to get it to show a display.
     
  5. almcneil

    almcneil TS Guru Posts: 1,554

    Yes, the overheating is the cause of your system crashes. Mose BIOSes monitor the temperature of the CPU and/or MoBo and if they go above a threshold, it shutsdown the system to prevent damage to the MoBo.

    90 deg-C is hot enough to fry an egg!! Actually, these temperature sensors are not all that accurate but still are useful as a ballpark indicator. If all the sensors are above 50 deg-C, you're entering dangerous territory!!

    The first solution is to add additional fans. Most MoBos come with at least one additional fan port for a "system" fan. It goes at the upper vent in the back of the chassis. It's purpose is to evacuate warm/hot air out of the chassis while the CPU fan is to help the heatsink remove heat from the CPU. Together, they can significantly lower your system's operating temps. Some MoBos even have a 3rd power port for a PSU fan. Check your MoBo manufacturer's manual to see if you have one.

    If that doesn't do it then get a bigger/better heatsink and faster CPU fan.
     
  6. almcneil

    almcneil TS Guru Posts: 1,554

    Sorry, forgot to answer your followup question.

    I think the reason behind your comp cycling on cold start has to do with some kind of non-volatile memory. When the comp crashes from overheating, the BIOS is simply shutting down it fast. It's not a graceful shutdown, rather, an abrupt power cutoff. That means neither Windows nor the BIOS saves any settings and values from the session. Consequently, this results in the comp starting up in an indeterminate or confused state. It may believe that it still needs to complete shutdown, hence, as soon as it starts up, it shuts right down. That's why you need to cycle the system multiple times for it to complete the shutdown. Once it has completed that, then it can boot up normally.
     
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