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How fast would a 10,000 rpm harddrive be?

By hellokitty[hk]
Apr 5, 2008
  1. How fast would a 10,000 rpm harddrive be? or even a 15,000 rpm harddrive even though i probably won't get one... Im wondering exactly how much better a 10,000 rpm hdd would be compared to a 5,200 or 7,200 rpm, would it really be worth the cost in most situations?
     
  2. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,915   +167

    10,000 rpm drives are used in servers where fast data access times are needed. I suppose if you have money to throw away you could use one. 7200 rpm drive are plenty fast enough for normal use. RAM drives are on the horizon. They are real fast
     
  3. hellokitty[hk]

    hellokitty[hk] Hello, nice to meet you! Topic Starter Posts: 4,370   +125

    RAM drives on the horizon yes, but it says somewere that triple channel ram is going to be supported by Intel Nehalem but anyway...

    The only thing i heard about them is that they will help boot up times and load times significantly, maybe so but are they worth the cost??!!

    Thanks, but im wondering more specific performance information lol. Do you know if they help at all in games? (games seem to be the most demanding thing for a comp sadly)
     
  4. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,074   +84 Staff Member

    If you have the cash, yes, in my opinion it's worth it. I would use a 10k RPM HDD for my OS/games and buy a 7200 RPM HDD for storage etc.

    If you're truly interested in buying the quickest drive for the price, take the time to compare actual media transfer rates of HDD's on the market versus the advertised maximum interface transfer rate (whether they're 7200 RPM or 10k RPM drives).
     
  5. hellokitty[hk]

    hellokitty[hk] Hello, nice to meet you! Topic Starter Posts: 4,370   +125

    Western digital raptors are well known and DO really have 10,000 RPM. i think...

    oh wait the WD raptors all say they have 1.5 GB/s transfer rates... shouldn't a fast drive have 3.0 GB/s?
    or does the RPM not matter with the transfer speeds?
     
  6. captaincranky

    captaincranky TechSpot Addict Posts: 10,811   +921

    About those specs

    They're electrical transfer rates and have nothing to do with data write/retrieval rates from the HDD itself.

    The fastest "drive" is RAM and if you have enough to allow the system to handle the current task without writing to the drive at all, then the system is flying.
     
  7. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,074   +84 Staff Member

    I'm not questioning the rate at which the disks spin, I am saying that despite the fact that an interface standard has a maximum transfer speed, it doesn't mean the drives actual media transfer speeds are that high. In fact, they're significantly slower.

    *Edit*

    Indeed...
     
  8. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,915   +167

    Basically,

    Average seek time:

    7200= 11ms
    10,000= 5ms
    15,000= 3ms

    The average seek time is how long the heads take to get to a track read/write
     
  9. hellokitty[hk]

    hellokitty[hk] Hello, nice to meet you! Topic Starter Posts: 4,370   +125

    Well ok... exactly how much of a difference would the write speed be between a good and bad one?
    And also the only SATA 10,000 rpm hdd's are Western Digital Raptors and they are very popular it seems.

    BTW is there storage capacity for 10,000 rpm hdd's more than 150GBs?
     
  10. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,074   +84 Staff Member

    Those questions can be answered by visiting Western Digital's website here: http://www.wdc.com/en/products/index.asp?Cat=3&Language=en.
     
  11. hellokitty[hk]

    hellokitty[hk] Hello, nice to meet you! Topic Starter Posts: 4,370   +125

    well with the time that it would have taken to go to the site and copy the URL or wahtever you did, you could have easily looked... but anyway fastestet Western Digital seem to be 150 :( i was hoping 250. oh well

    Well the transfere speeds are alot worse for 10,000 drives but have anyone actually USED one and can tell me the boot up and load time differences or any differences they found?
     
     
  12. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,074   +84 Staff Member

    With the amount of time it took for you to ask the questions you could of gone to their site and checked for yourself.

    If you're actually considering buying a new HDD, what is your budget?
     
  13. hellokitty[hk]

    hellokitty[hk] Hello, nice to meet you! Topic Starter Posts: 4,370   +125

    Yes i could have. But i didn't think of it lol.
    hmph well nothing over $200 on a single hdd as i could probably get a 1 TB with that kind of money...
     
  14. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,074   +84 Staff Member

  15. captaincranky

    captaincranky TechSpot Addict Posts: 10,811   +921

    There's a trick to everything

    RAID 0 will mostly half the write/retrieve of the drive system. But, your data is split across 2 drives making recovery difficult in the event of a problem. So then you would also want RAID 1 for data protection.

    Does a non-spinning HDD wear out faster? Good question, does a drive sitting in a box wear out or die of old age?

    You're starting to ask strings of questions just for the answers, not for the need of the answers. You have to understand that being a secondary school for computer technology is beyond the reasonable scope of a forum such as this. People have problems, we try our best to solve them. But, a protracted discussion on the relative merits of 10K HDD vs 7.2K RPM HDD, vs SATA150 vs SATA300 vs SCSI with all possible permutations qualitatively assessed is a tad over the line. The short answer is that not all systems work best (or are even necessary for all reasons and part of the responsibility for acquiring that knowledge is incumbent upon you through individual research. A great part of technological problem solving is defining the need first, then tailoring the solution to meet it. Not investigating all the possible solutions, then looking around for a need. That's the kind of BS they do in marketing. Somebody I think, came up with a box to talk into which then converts it to a text message, and of course, some a****** will buy them. Solutions for a need that doesn't actually exsist, that's the kind of thing we needn't tackle

    I'm just an old pooh, aren't I?
     
  16. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,074   +84 Staff Member

  17. hellokitty[hk]

    hellokitty[hk] Hello, nice to meet you! Topic Starter Posts: 4,370   +125

    Ok ok just one actually two more questions, then we can be done with this post:

    Which RAID is the one were two hdds mirror each other?

    How long is a standard 7200rpm hdd expected to last and is there a difference between 7200, 5200, and 10000?
    You don't really need to reaserch this question but if you know the answer please tell me.
    Thanks!
     
  18. fullmetalvegan

    fullmetalvegan TS Enthusiast Posts: 162

    RAID 0 is Data Stripping, splits it across two drives and makes read times faster.

    RAID 1 is Data Mirroring, makes a backup of one drive onto the other.

    Both above require two drives, as you probably know.

    RAID 0+1 is both. Requires four HDD's.

    That's like saying, how long is a piece of string? It could be any legnth. You cannot predict how long it will last. It could last a day, a month, a year, etc. Generally, you can expect them to last quite a long while (year/s), but no one can tell you a digit as to what to expact.

    I have two Western Digital 150GB X Raptor's in RAID 0, with a Seagate Barracuda 500GB as my storage. The last time I had two Seagate in RAID 0, one of the HDD failed within a week. WD is doing fine, how ever.

    The higher the RPM, the faster the read time. That's the only difference.

    Either buy a 10,000 RPM HDD or don't, it's not a life changing decision. =P It'll give you a slight performance boost, but nothing incredibly significant unless you put them into RAID 0.
     
  19. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,074   +84 Staff Member

    Aye, both well said.

    Hellokitty[hk], they have an estimated "MTBF" in both of those specification sheets that I linked, however, don't trust that as an accurate number as to how long your drive will last.

    WD1500ADFD and A7K1000 MTBF: 1,200,000 hours.
     
  20. hellokitty[hk]

    hellokitty[hk] Hello, nice to meet you! Topic Starter Posts: 4,370   +125

    Ok thanks everyone!! I think im done now... so you can sorta forget about this thread lol.
     
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