How to get around pre-programmed settings in XP?

By Billion
Aug 16, 2007
  1. Hi there. I work for a certain large retail chain selling electronics. The department in the store I work at is brand new (so am I) and, as is typical in this type of business, the computer they've just given us to use has been had severe limitations put on it by tech guys in the head offices. I don't know much about the hardware, except that it seems to be an old IBM (probably P3)...but I don't think that matters. The OS is XP Professional.

    When you boot Windows the one and only thing you can use is Internet Explorer. It's the only icon on the desktop, and the only option on the start menu. Right-clicking is disabled in all circumstances. IE itself is also very limited, as there's no address bar. The home page presents a searchable database of our company's products, as well as several links to manufacturers' sites and competing chains' sites. IE's UI consists of Back and Forward buttons, Home, and Print.

    I'm aware that it's set up this way for a reason, but I'd love to be able to unlock a few more resources like say, Google, and maybe a little word processor so we don't have to worry so much about keeping track of post-it notes. I promise that if anyone can tell me a way to "hack through" the limitations they've put in place, I won't use the knowledge for anything morally questionable. I'd just like to give the machine some more functionality, and I'd only do it with the approval of my immediate superiors. (I don't think they'd care if it wasn't what upper-management intended, but I'll see.)

    Anyway, maybe it's not even possible, but I figured if it is one of the computer geniuses on TechSpot will know!
  2. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 7,241   +9

    Since you are new and the store is new, and they have a tech department, I would think you really don't want to mess with things AT ALL. It makes no difference to you, really. But those guys have reasons for what they setup, not to mention insurance, corporate board policy. I'll bet donuts that they have a policy and procedures statement you signed when you were selected that forbid any of this. Not many corporate people will tolerate any employee that thinks he can diddle with the system that others have slaved to learn.
    If you value your job, make darn sure you know the reasons behind everything they do. I am almost certain they have a hidden detection system that will alert them to your messing around. Why do it? Not worth it? You are there to learn and to become one of them? Do your own thing at home.
  3. Billion

    Billion TS Rookie Topic Starter

    Ahaha, you make me feel so immature. Of course, I'm sure you're right about everything you said. I think you've convinced me, I'm 95% sure I won't try anything, and 100% sure I wouldn't without asking if it's okay.

    ...not that I still wouldn't be interested in knowing, strictly for educational purposes.:cool:

    And PS: Thanks, seriously, for the wise advice.
  4. SNGX1275

    SNGX1275 TS Forces Special Posts: 10,689   +395

    I don't think there is an easy way to do what you want. But there may be a possibility you could run a live linux distribution on that computer. So depending on the circumstances of what the computer is supposed to do and who uses it that may be an option.

    Also if you can get to the Run box (start menu, run) AND they haven't disabled connecting USB devices you could get to a USB stick with portable applications on it and run those.
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