Is it safe to temporarily use an older 430W PSU with Quad Core/ATI 2900 Pro?

By Schmutz
Feb 1, 2009
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  1. My computer kept shutting down randomly, and now my power supply unit (Corsair VX 550W) is not functioning at all. The fan doesn't spin anymore etc.

    I am in the process of getting that replaced, but I am looking to use my secondary PC's PSU temporarily. It's spec is as follows:

    Manufacturer: Taurus
    Website: www.taurusx.com
    Model name: TX-430-PFC-C
    Output: 430 Watt

    and I have retrieved this information from the sticker on the unit:

    DC output: +3.3V +5V +12V -5V -12V +5Vsb
    MAX.A: 35A 36A 18A 1A 1A 2A

    +5&+3.3V COMBINED 200W

    I just wanted to understand any dangers there could be in doing this. My power hungry graphics card concerns me the most, it uses (8/6pin???) connectors from my corsair PSU. But do powerful graphics cards not offer the option of operating quietly if they do not receive enough power? I remember an old Nvidia card I used to have that required a 4pin connection for more speed, but it was optional

    Thanks for any help, I really hope I'll be able to use this PSU for a few weeks while the other one is replaced

    Schmutz
  2. Spyder_1386

    Spyder_1386 Newcomer, in training Posts: 563

    Hey Schmutz

    Don't know whether it'll be able to manage for too long. You could always remove the graphics card for a couple of weeks until the other power supply returns. It should be safe though, i can't see any problems occurring other than the 430W power supply also collapsing.

    Spyder_1386
  3. SNGX1275

    SNGX1275 TS Forces Special Posts: 12,419   +281

    I'd say you are fine if you don't game with it.
  4. Rage_3K_Moiz

    Rage_3K_Moiz Sith Lord Posts: 7,280   +23

    Absolutely not. Your entire system will probably pull more power from the +12V rail than is available (even at idle). You will most likely blow it soon, if not immediately, and if the PSU does not have adequate protection (which is likely since this is a low-end unit), the resultant current surge will likely damage other components. This is made more likely by the fact that it is an old one.
  5. Schmutz

    Schmutz Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 241

    thanks, I'm glad I checked here. I was curious because I have work that I would rather do from home than use the college computers (or this laptop - horrible!).

    The 430W psu is currently used in my other computer (AMD 3500+/SKT939/6600GT) which is completely unaccessible at the moment until I find another SKT 939 motherboard - http://www.techspot.com/vb/topic119399.html . I'm sure the motherboard is the problem there, but I wonder if it was caused by the PSU? Maybe I should find another SKT939 board and a new PSU for that system... if I did this I'd be able to use the new PSU in my main computer for a few weeks while it's current PSU is replaced.
  6. Schmutz

    Schmutz Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 241

    I've purchased a new PSU now and I'm back up and running - I'm relieved that it WAS the PSU faulty and not some other component!

    From PCWorlds limited selection, I went with the Jeantech Absolute 1000w. I wish I understood PSU's a little better but it has 4x 12V rails @ 20A and is working flawlessly so far. I'll use it in my other computer when I get my Corsair unit back as I believe that one is still the better PSU (can anyone confirm that?)
  7. Rage_3K_Moiz

    Rage_3K_Moiz Sith Lord Posts: 7,280   +23

    The Jeantech has 75A total on the +12V rail, far more than what you would need and what any other quality 1kW PSU would provide. I cannot find any OEM information on the net either. But still, it will be decent, as long as you load it to less than 80% of its +12V power rating (which would be very difficult to do IMO, unless you have a ultra-high-end quad-GPU, OCed quad-core CPU setup and more than 4 HDDs).

    The Corsair is by far the more reliable unit though.
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