TechSpot

Jeep hacking raises fears over vehicle vulnerabilities

By Shawn Knight
Aug 3, 2015
Post New Reply
  1. Hackers have been demonstrating for years that vehicles are just as susceptible to hacking as any other electronic gadget yet it wasn’t until the recent hack of a Jeep Cherokee’s infotainment system and Chrysler’s subsequent recall that people started to take notice.

    According to Kelley Blue Book’s recent Vehicle Hacking Vulnerability Survey, 72 percent of respondents said they were aware of the Jeep hack in question while 41 percent said the incident will be of consideration when buying or leasing their next vehicle.

    But just how big of a problem could vehicle hacking pose?

    The survey found that a third of those questioned see vehicle hacking as a serious problem while 78 percent believe it will be a frequent problem over the next three years. Much like PC hacking, most believe vehicle vulnerabilities will become a permanent fixture moving forward with an overwhelming majority – 81 percent – citing vehicle manufacturers are most responsible for securing a vehicle from hacking.

    Given the recent Chrysler recall, it’s little surprise that those surveyed felt the automaker’s vehicles were most susceptible to hacking (70 percent). General Motors was ranked as the second most susceptible in the eyes of survey-takers at 47 percent followed by Ford with 30 percent.

    Karl Brauer, senior analyst for Kelley Blue Book, said cyber-security is still a relatively new area of specialization for automakers but it’s one they need to take seriously to ensure they are ahead of the curve.

    Permalink to story.

     
  2. psycros

    psycros TS Evangelist Posts: 1,319   +709

    Here's a nutty idea: maybe we don't need to put WiFi into every piece of machinery in existence. Can anyone really say that wireless connectivity is that vital to your automotive experience? Sure, remote lock/unlock is occasionally convenient, and I suppose being able to pump tunes from your phone cable-free is nice (even though it runs the battery down quickly). But beyond that? I don't see enough benefit to justify the bottomless can of worms that's introduced by connecting *everything*. This goes double for things like medical gear and home security systems. The only people who really want the "Internet of Things" are the companies looking for more revenue streams. The rest of us would be happy if our wireless internet could actually reach the far end of the house.
     
    wiyosaya likes this.
  3. Adhmuz

    Adhmuz TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,648   +521

    WiFi in a vehicle isn't for the driver, it's for the two annoying brats in the back seat that can't go 5 minutes without WiFi connectivity on their tablets, you'd think it would be more practical to just give those devices LTE connectivity instead of ****ing over the entire vehicle with potentially devastating outcomes by allowing the brakes to be controlled wirelessly by some third party in China. But heck GM needs another reason to need a bail out am I right?

    "pump tunes from your phone cable-free is nice" I've been using this wireless technology currently employed in almost every wireless device, it's called Blue-tooth, maybe check it out if that's the reason you think you need WiFi in your vehicle. Just kidding, but I'm sure some people actually think this is a reason to get a vehicle with this technology unknowingly.
     
  4. Darth Shiv

    Darth Shiv TS Evangelist Posts: 1,620   +376

    Simple solution is to not integrate internet connectivity into any part of the car that is associated with driving mechanics. It's the same as protecting an airplane from hacking.
     
  5. amstech

    amstech TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 1,455   +606

    They will never be ahead of the curve.
     

Similar Topics

Add New Comment

You need to be a member to leave a comment. Join thousands of tech enthusiasts and participate.
TechSpot Account You may also...