TechSpot

Looking for a new PSU...

By Billy213
Jun 20, 2007
  1. as i know now that my current psu is utterly poop i decided to invest in a new one. Currently its a 380W Trust one (+12 = 15A apparently lol). My machine isn't in need of that much power either:

    Pentium D 820
    1.5 gig 553mhz ram
    Radeon X1650 pro PCI-E 256mb DDR3
    160gb hdd
    dvd-rw
    and a couple of fans

    i was looking at this:

    http://www.ebuyer.com/customer/prod...hvd19wcm9kdWN0X292ZXJ2aWV3&product_uid=115163

    any thoughts or opinions of what i could get for that price instead?
     
  2. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    Do a search on this forum or Google for Power Supply Calculators... There is some good software out there... free or nearly free which will help you tabulate all you power users into a framework where you can see what you will need for normal operation, and for those brief intensive moments when you need every bit of power you can scrape together.
     
  3. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    280W at full load :D

    i also took into account the upgrades i am looking at getting

    ati x1950 pro and a C2D E6420

    that only comes up as 250W required, is this because of my pentium d? is it a power hungry cpu?
     
  4. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    Not a power hungry CPU, but a power hungry X1950.
    The real problem in power supplies is evaluating quality. The builders have created a market for themselves. But the average power supply problem is not one of power, but of quality components and great engineering design. Name brands mean something. Tear a few apart and you will see. Put them on the bench and you will know.
    Still, you are better off with a 400 watt power supply than what you have in that 250W unit.
     
  5. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    My PSU atm is 380W lol but poor quality. And i was possibly going to get a X1950 pro with a C2D. According to a PSU calculator my current set up of a Pentium D and a X1650 Pro uses more power than that which confuses me :S
     
  6. LinkedKube

    LinkedKube TechSpot Project Baby Posts: 4,265   +41

    the calculator is okay for what it is, but in order to find out what you really need, you need to donate to that site and get the pro version or platinum version or w/e it is, in order to calculate what you will need on your rails. Goodluck.
     
  7. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    but all i really want to know is if this is a good PSU. I know coolermaster are a good make but i'm not sure about their PSU's. I know 430w is more than enough to run my current set up as i'm currently running it on less with a mere 15A on the +12.
     
  8. thebaronjocelin

    thebaronjocelin TS Enthusiast Posts: 196

    Be especially careful with the cooling. If you intend to put any particular component under a load you're going to want an internal-facing fan in the PSU to move the hot internal air away from the PSU, and an external-facing fan (larger, by nature), to move any stray hot air from inside the unit itself. Not to mention, a lot of lower-grade manufacturers don't lube the bearings on the fans adequately, which can result in noise pollution and a lot of grief.
     
  9. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    i think the fan on this is about 12cm blowing air onto the mobo and cpu etc. and as its a coolermaster i don't think i will have to worry about inefficient lube on the bearings
     
  10. thebaronjocelin

    thebaronjocelin TS Enthusiast Posts: 196

    I had an old Coolermaster that was kicking around, maybe I got it three years ago, that's lube had worn out. But it's an old machine so there's not much to worry about. By the time it does wear out, you're going to need a new machine anyways. Good pick there, Billy.
     
  11. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    Thanks, if it does wear out i can always slip some WD40 in there. That does the trick with most things ;)
     
     
  12. thebaronjocelin

    thebaronjocelin TS Enthusiast Posts: 196

    I'm a big fan of rifle or paintball-marker grease. It's designed for parts that move alot, so it has some staying power. However, it is decidedly thinner than WD40, and sometimes may drip. A good lube job doesn't have to worry about that, if you clean up using a Q-Tip.
     
  13. halo71

    halo71 TS Rookie Posts: 1,289

    Please explain this "grease" you are referring to. I have been playing paintball for almost 10 years now and have never heard of a grease for a marker. Just light machine oil.
     
  14. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    I googled it and found this

    http://www.slickhoneyusa.com/

    "many pro’s use this product because you can lower your operating pressures, get less ball breaks while maintaining your velocity. Less friction means less wear"
     
  15. thebaronjocelin

    thebaronjocelin TS Enthusiast Posts: 196

    Yes: I go to a local paintball shop to buy my grease. I believe it's name is GOLD's Trophy Marker Oil. I don't know if it would be any different from normal or light machine oil, but it works.
     
  16. halo71

    halo71 TS Rookie Posts: 1,289

    Yeah okay, that is still an oil. Not really a grease in the sense as axle grease.
     
  17. thebaronjocelin

    thebaronjocelin TS Enthusiast Posts: 196

    Oh, certainly not. That would bring performance down.
     
  18. halo71

    halo71 TS Rookie Posts: 1,289

    Hence my asking! :p
     
  19. mailpup

    mailpup TS Special Forces Posts: 8,452   +227

    Don't use WD-40 as a bearing lubricant. I repair autos and trucks as a hobby on most weekends and WD-40 is a handy item to have when used properly but it is not a good lubricant. Sure it's oily when you first apply it but when the carrier dries, it leaves a sticky residue, brown in color, that is anything but a lubricant.

    WD stands for water displacement. It can be used on most auto electrical connections and distributors to clear out moisture that might be causing problems such as shorting. I often use it as a temporary lubricant when chasing threads with a tap or die but not as a permanent lubricant for anything.
     
  20. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    Ouch, well if it the lube runs out then i'll just end up getting a new one :p or just submerge it in a tank of WD40 as an experiment :p can the fans in PSU's be replaced?
     
  21. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    The fans in PSU's can be replaced... if you have a good soldering iron and fan requiring the correct amperage... But the cost is preposterous... and it is almost never the fan that fails in a power supply.
    If you are trying to increase the cooling or the air flow, quality case fans are much more effective.
     
  22. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    No i don't need it for extra cooling. Are fans normally covered under the warranties anyway?
     
  23. mailpup

    mailpup TS Special Forces Posts: 8,452   +227

    If you've already used WD-40 as a lubricant, apply another lubricant as soon as possible. It is not a matter of it running out but rather of drying. The carrier will dry in a matter of several minutes to a few hours, depending. Once that happens it will be as bad or worse than if you applied nothing at all.

    Edit: If you open the PSU to do anything to the fans, you will void the warranty.
     
  24. Billy213

    Billy213 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 59

    I haven't added WD40 to anything lol, it was just a thought as we were on the subject of cheap PSU fans lubricant drying out. but seeing as i was horribly wrong i'll have to keep that in mind for future reference
     
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.