NAS Synology+switch+router

By raraschek
May 19, 2010
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  1. i´m planning to upgrade my home network, please try to suggest if this works:

    D-link DI 524 router
    PC1-Win 7 ultimate- gigabit network card
    PC2-Win 7 home - 100mb network card
    D-Link DGS-1005D 5port switch - gigabit
    NAS Synology 110j - gigabit

    cables -
    CAT6 between PC1 and switch, NAS and switch, router and switch

    CAT5 between PC2 and router.

    The question is- will my ftp server built in the NAS will be able to communicate and send files at "gigabit". I know there will be a loss of speed, but I want to make sure that it wont slow down on 100mb because of the router...
    thanks
  2. tipstir

    tipstir TS Ambassador Posts: 4,487   +73

    Hope you're using a gig switch somewhere
  3. raraschek

    raraschek Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    not yet - trying to find out if it will work when i install it the way descibed above
  4. Leeky

    Leeky TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +97

    If the runs are short cat5e cable will run gigabit speed. From research I've done I've come to realise that an integral aspect of meeting cat6 specification deals with the fitting of the end connectors.

    If your going to purchase patch leads then go for cat6, as these will already be fitted with connectors, and since prices for cat6 or cat5e or pretty much the same it would be unproductive longterm to go for the lower spec cables.

    Also, any communications through your router is going to slow down your lan speed from gigabit to 100MB. I'm not sure if putting the switch between the router and the PCs will make any difference, as its the router directing the traffic I believe. I could however be incorrect, so it would be good if someone could confirm this.

    Your best bet would be to purchase a router with gigabit ports as standard. It won't be an issue then. :) You won't need a switch then, as you'll still have one of the 4 ports spare, and all running at gigabit as well.

    Also, for the sake of the price of a network card I would just purchase a gigabit NIC for your 2nd PC, and run the entire network at gigabit speed. :)
  5. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,029   +222

    Clearly, all network components will need to be gigabit, but there are other issues.

    First, the theoretical limit is reduce to ~72% empirically, due to the fact of the nature of
    Ethernet being a contention architecture (creating collisions and retries above the 72% number).

    Secondly, there is both a sender, the network and the receiver.
    If the sender can't feed the data fast enough, OR
    if the receiver can't dispose of the buffers to disk fast enough,
    then you will get significantly less that the 72% data rate.
  6. tipstir

    tipstir TS Ambassador Posts: 4,487   +73

    Need to divide 100mbps and 1000mbps. I do that don't have any issues. Corp switches do the same of course they're migrating over from 100mbps to 1GB and 10GB switches. Router can mange the traffic of packets but the external switch does a much better job doing that.
  7. raraschek

    raraschek Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    Yes, thats clear to me, but the components that I would buy are 60€;
    meanwhile a gigabit router is 81+cables+cards....
    so i was trying to find a better solution.
  8. Leeky

    Leeky TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +97

    Whereabouts are you mate?

    I'm sure you can get something cheaper than that!
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