S.M.A.R.T., RAM, HDD fault

By eddy05
Jun 12, 2002
  1. I wanna ask how S.M.A.R.T. affects your computer system when it's on/off. It is recommended to turn it on/off? Are you people turning it on/off? why... Sorry but this question bugged me for 4 years.

    RAMs. What is the difference between "better" RAMs and "Normal" RAMs? Crucial claimed that their RAMs are "better" than others, but I thought RAMs are the same? Or is there any function difference or more reliability?

    What will happen if I placed both PC100s and PC133s on:
    A PC100-only motherboard?
    A PC133-compatible motherboard?

    I tried to copy files from my HDD1 to my HDD2... but during the middle of the copying, the system keeps crash... then recover... then crash.... then recover and finally it gave a BSOD "Data couldn't not be written onto D:" The HDD LED keeps flashing but there's no activity... Is my HDD2 dying? (it's a Seagate ST series 18.6gb 5400rpm)
  2. Didou

    Didou Bowtie extraordinair! Posts: 4,274

    S.M.A.R.T. = Self Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology

    It's a system that utilises internal hard disk drive monitoring technology.

    Turning it on shouldn't translate in lower performance but remember that it is asking for the HDD to do some extra monitoring work.

    The difference between "normal" & "better" can be many things. It can go from better PCB use, better memory modules yields to better warranty, etc. I've had a few issues with NoName RAMS so from now on I only go with brands that I know ( such as Crucial ). Brand RAM can generally work with very aggressive memory timings without any problems. I've had Stability problems on my A7V66-E when I used NoName RAM even though RAM timings were set to SPD ( most conservative timings ).

    Using PC133 on a PC100 motherboard will make it work at 100. When you mix memory types, both of the memory modules will align on the slowest one ( 100 in this case ). Otherwise, it would be overclocking your PC100 module to 133 & as in any other overclock, luck plays a major role in it.;)
  3. eddy05

    eddy05 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 152

    Thanks Nidou!

    I have another question... for a small amount of price difference between [SeaGate 40gb 5400rpm] and [Maxtor 40gb 5400rpm], how much reliable is Maxtor over SeaGate?
  4. Didou

    Didou Bowtie extraordinair! Posts: 4,274

    Seagates are very reliable, I mean you could drive over it with a truck & it would still work. Ok, maybe that's a bit over the top but they have very low failure rates ( as far as IDE is concerned ).

    Maxtor on the other hand have a very good RMA policy. You could be in the Sahara & have a failure & they would be there in an hour with a new HDD & cold beer ( yes I know, it's a bit over the top again ;) ). Seriously, their RMAs come back very fast & so far I haven't had any problems with mine ( I'm new to Maxtor BTW ).
  5. MYOB

    MYOB TS Rookie Posts: 492

    I personaly would get the Maxtor. I have loads of Maxtor disks from ages ago, all still working, and I dislike Seagate for pulling there Fab out of Ireland a fw years back.
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