Walmart announces disc-to-digital service for DVD and Blu-ray discs

By Shawn Knight
Mar 14, 2012
Post New Reply
  1. Walmart has announced a new disc-to-digital service that will allow customers to access digital versions of DVDs and Blu-ray discs they own via a collaboration with streaming service VUDU. Theā€¦

    Read the whole story
  2. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 5,765   +1,427

    For a small fee, no its not something I would utilize. But to be fair, I don't see any value in the service if it was for free.
  3. What, no VHS? :)
  4. It doesn't mention that Wal-Mart will keep your copy of the disc upon activation--it just says they will activate it on Vudu. You can then always sell the disc to a non early adopter and recoup the profits. UltraViolet is the industry-backed digital distribution platform, so there's a good chance this program could work.

    However, if you give it a year or so I'm 99% certain that Amazon will introduce something similar or better than this. IMO, though, Vudu is a great platform....
  5. 9Nails

    9Nails TechSpot Paladin Posts: 941   +82

    I'll wait for the "Google Music" version where I've uploaded my CD's online for FREE. Netflix or Vudu could potentially make this service free by selling me new movies to add to my collection to cover their costs for storage. But with data deduplication, their storage costs will be minimal. It's certainly not worth $2 per title to "upload" to the cloud when they're just zapping my barcode and that's that. And that doesn't do me any good for my home movies that I've burned to DVD.

    One thing I'd like to know, do I get full access to my DVD's with commentary and additional footage, or is this just the feature film? And, can I turn on the #$%#!!! commercial advertisements on those Disney films?
  6. IAMTHESTIG

    IAMTHESTIG TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 384   +34

    Why would I pay to have an access to an electronic copy of something I already own? Your buying the video twice now? How does this make sense?
  7. if you all ready own the movie
    why would you pay even more companies to watch the movie you already own
    I understand if you are buying the electronic version of the movie for cheap and down load it to you equipment then thats a good deal
    but what there offering is a streaming service so now you are paying
    walmart, VUDU,and your ISP to watch a movie you already own not to mention you need a VUDU compatible device to watch said movie
    oh and one more thing if you travel outside the USA you cant watch it.
  8. Vrmithrax

    Vrmithrax TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,283   +229

    Make this more like STEAM and I might be interested. I don't want to put my library of movies up on a cloud and be hostage to a streaming-only service that involves internet connections and data usage. However, let me have access to my entire library on whatever platform I choose, with the option to stream or download the titles I want to that device for offline viewing, and you might catch my interest.
  9. Aerney

    Aerney Newcomer, in training

    Any digital service that doesn't allow someone to take the video with them is pretty much useless. As stated above, this service only allows streaming, so why would I stream something that I have physical access to? And why would I PAY again to have access to something I already have access to? I guess this is the entertainment industries way to push people back to stealing digital copies of videos so that they can put them on their tablets so they can actually watch them where ever they want (Like on the road to keep a child entertained). The one time I tried to use the Ultraviolet service, it wouldnt even work... so good luck to anyone that falls for this!
  10. Buy it and don't open it, walk over get them to scan it and then return it un-opened... $2 movies for everyone!
  11. the only time that this service would be any good is if the movie you own has been damaged by someone or something (like your dog chewing on the disk making it unusable) and the movie is out of print and you cant buy a second hand copy of it anywhere on the cheap
     
  12. Mudvayne819

    Mudvayne819 Newcomer, in training Posts: 41

    I dont understand i saw some days ago a compagny was refused to release his new product that do exactly what walmart want to offer and will offer, but that lil compagny couldnt release his final product.

    ****ing corpocracie
  13. Cycloid Torus

    Cycloid Torus TechSpot Booster Posts: 164   +38

    VHS might be worth doing. DVD, meh. Maybe for a buck - or 25 for $20. Would need strong assurance that this service won't morph into the nether-reaches in just a matter of years. I want ARCHIVE that I can access for the next 50-60 years.
  14. captaincranky

    captaincranky TechSpot Addict Posts: 10,399   +831

    I'm just going to hang on to my DVDs thank you very much.

    So, if anybody wants to give up their DVD copy of "Avatar" so they can watch it on their "smart" phone, carpe diem,... (or should that be "caveat emptor"? Non compos mentus, perhaps)?

    Hm, I wonder how far the MPAA's ears perked up when they heard this announcement?

    And on the seventh day, whereupon God had rested, man inventeth "Redbox". And man saweth this, and proclaimeth it good!

    (Well, all but for a random sampling of imbeciles who wanteth to give away their DVDs to Walmart).
  15. TJGeezer

    TJGeezer TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 385   +10

    Are you saying they do? If so, I'd have zero interest. Or negative interest - paying Wal-Mart $2 to swipe a bar code and then take my DVD? Yeah, right.

    But I doubt they'd even want to do that. It'd cost Sam Walton's billionaire children actual money to have Wal-Mart deal with storage and disposal, don't forget. Unless it was imposed by the don't-get-digital entertainment moguls and their armies of lawyers.

    The Vudu streaming service sounds interesting, though. Netflix provides a good alternative to the plastic DVD movie, Google does the same with music, Apple has its own game-changing approach... The whole content market is changing fast. Wal-Mart's attempt is still only early days for personal streaming.

    As somebody said, wait a year and Amazon (or Google, or Apple, or Netflix, or your neighbor Bob's bright 17-year-old) will get it right.
  16. captaincranky

    captaincranky TechSpot Addict Posts: 10,399   +831

    OK, for them to upload your specific DVD to the cloud, they have to circumvent the copy protection, which as I understand it, is illegal.

    So, either they're selling you a cloud copy of a DVD you already own illegally, Or, they must pay royalties on the DVD copy back to the MPAA. (This of course, if they allow you to keep the original disc).

    As I understand it, "backing up" a DVD is a conundrum, since you're not allowed to keep the copy if you lose the original.

    REDBOX......."It doesn't spell "murder" backwards.
  17. WHEN, exactly, have you EVER seen a Walmart employee smile like the one depicted in this article? I want to know exact time, date and location, and a picture for proof.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.