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Weekend tech reading: HP splits in two today, GDDR5X memory slides leak, all Tribes games now free

By Matthew
Nov 1, 2015
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  1. All versions of Tribes free to download Welcome! Join Hi-Rez Studios in celebrating over twenty years of the Tribes universe! Below you will find links to download the legacy games in the series. We love these games and hope to let you share the experience of the world's fastest shooter. Tribes

    If drones are here to stay, n00bs must lead the way As the popularity of personal drones continues down a path of exponential growth, so too does the amount of controversy attached to their use. Most arguments boil down to a "pro-drone vs. anti-drone" debate, but even within the pro-drone community two seemingly rival camps have formed. On one side are those who advocate a measure of training and education for drone flyers; opposite them are the manufacturers... Ars Technica

    Meg Whitman seeks reinvention for HP as it prepares for split When Meg Whitman,Hewlett-Packard’s chief executive, was preparing to cleave her company in two, she feared reliving a shoe disaster from early in her career. Ms. Whitman was an executive in charge of the Keds brand at Stride Rite a few decades ago as the company was making a transition to a new "high-tech" warehouse. The transition was bungled, and for nine months the problem could not be fixed. The NY Times

    Windows users often forget about patching their Apple programs A survey of applications installed on Windows computers found that a lot of users don't run up-to-date versions of Apple programs. Apple's multimedia program, QuickTime, and its iTunes software were ranked as some of the most "exposed" programs based on risk by Secunia Research, which is now part of Flexera Software. Computerworld

    Technology device ownership: 2015 Today, 68% of U.S. adults have a smartphone, up from 35% in 2011, and tablet computer ownership has edged up to 45% among adults, according to newly released survey data from the Pew Research Center.1 Smartphone ownership is nearing the saturation point with some groups: 86% of those ages 18-29 have a smartphone, as do 83% of those ages 30-49 and 87% of those living in households earning $75,000 and up annually. Pew Research

    Revisiting the original, quietly revolutionary Assassin's Creed "Nothing is true, everything is permitted." Across the various timelines and protagonists of the Assassin's Creed series, this motto has remained constant. Taken from Vladimir Bartol's 1938 novel Alamut, the series uses it to endorse a sort of individualistic freedom, encouraging players to challenge social norms and instead dictate the course of their own lives. It's a fitting message, given the premise of the first game. KillScreenDaily

    Slides touting GDDR5X memory advantages leak online A trio of slides detailing the advantages of employing GDDR5X in graphics cards have leaked online, reports VRZone. The slides are said to come from a major DRAM supplier's presentation deck. GDDR5X is promoted as a good choice for graphics cards makers going forward as it offers double the data rate per-pin and extends a well established standard, so will be easy to implement, adding money savings to its attractiveness. Hexus

    The $24 billion data business that telcos don't want to talk about U.K. grocer Morrisons, ad-buying behemoth GroupM and other marketers and agencies are testing never-before-available data from cellphone carriers that connects device location and other information with telcos' real-world files on subscribers. Some services offer real-time heat maps showing the neighborhoods where store visitors go home at night, lists the sites they visited on mobile browsers recently and more. Ad Age

    Lessons from a decade of IT failures Ten years ago, IEEE Spectrum published "Why Software Fails," an article that examined the underlying causes of notable project failures. A couple of years later, we started the Risk Factor blog, with the goal of tracking technology failures both large and small. To commemorate the last decade’s worth of failures, we organized and analyzed the data we've collected. IEEE Spectrum

    IBM to acquire The Weather Company IBM hopes it has a new use for Watson, its artificial intelligence business. The company announced on Wednesday that it had entered into a definitive agreement to acquire most of the assets of the Weather Company, including its Weather.com website, a large number of weather data collection points, consumer and business applications and a staff of over 900 people. The NY Times

    'Earthlight' astronaut VR sim puts you on the ISS, NASA collaborates on realism Opaque Media Group, a Melbourne-based VR studio, recently announced Earthlight, an upcoming first-person space simulator that places you in the flight suit of a current day astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS). If Earthlight’s 360-degree teaser trailer is any indicator, the game is going for a stark realism that aims to catch you up in the mystique of the oft discussed 'overview effect', a marked cognitive shift that astronauts experience when they see the Earth from space for the first time. Road to VR

    Copyright Office rules: Yes, security researchers may hack cars (and a couple other things) for science Copyright law is surprisingly pervasive. It affects everything from computers to cars (and tractors). The law says you're not allowed to circumvent DRM on anything for any reason… except for a big pile of things you actually legally can. Those exemptions get re-evaluated every three years, and today the new list is out. Consumerist

    Thoughts on YouTube Red Since YouTube recently announced their new payed service "YouTube Red". Everyone has been up to arms about it, for mainly good reasons! YouTube doesn't exactly have the greatest reputation when it comes to new updates. YouTube Red's main selling points being: You can watch YouTube without ads, watch original shows, download videos, access to music library, etc. All for $10 a month. PewDiePie

    Researchers create a sonic tractor beam Using a simple set of loudspeakers, scientists have figured out a way to levitate and rotate objects in midair. If perfected, this "sonic tractor beam" could find uses ranging from treating kidney stones to creating artificial gravity on the International Space Station. Scientists have used sound to levitate objects before. That feat isn't surprising, as sound is a wave of pressure strong enough to move your eardrum. However, instead of audible sound, sonic levitation utilizes higher ultrasonic frequencies that are beyond the range of human hearing. Science Mag

    The final word on 'The Phantom Pain', a video game about video games The prologue of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is gruelling. You are a legendary soldier, woken from a nine-year coma with your arm missing and your muscles turned to jelly. You crawl along the hospital floor not for stealth, as is tradition, but because at first you cannot stand, bare skin squeaking helplessly along a blood-slicked floor. Vice

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