Will these Range Extenders work?

By the grip
Jul 15, 2008
  1. I have a D-Link Di-524 Router that is 2.4mhz and 802.11g. This router is wired to my PC in the office (second floor) and wired to my son's computer in the next room. I also have a laptop that I use on the first floor. Most days I get a good signal downstairs, but sometimes I have a low signal and depending on where I use it ie..Kitchen or livingroom I can sometimes loose the signal.

    I would like to get an inexpensive range extender or wireless repeater. I have been looking at the Hawking wireless G range extender (HWREG1) or the Belkin Wireless G Universal Range Extender (F5D7132). Will both of these work with my exsisting system? Is one better than the other or should I go with something completely different? Thank you in advance for your advice, I appreciate the help.
  2. NetCablesPlus

    NetCablesPlus TS Maniac Posts: 228

    I do not know about these specific extenders/repeaters, but, overall, I mostly hear about people who have been dissatisifed with the results (or lack thereof) from these types of devices. It seems like whatever type of interference caused the original connectivity problem(s) continued to do so with the extenders/repeaters. It could be that these devices are mostly intended to extend the distance of a good wireless connection and not to overcome other problems that the signals may be having in getting to your machine.
  3. the grip

    the grip TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 26

    Thank you. I will check into any problems that I'm having with the router. Thanks again.
  4. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 7,241   +9

    You mentioned the DLink 524, but not the other devices.

    I would just update the DLink to a more recent model of DLink, or Linksys. in the N-Series. You will have much better luck with D-Link N, LinkSys N, or Netgear N with Wireless, than with the Hawking or Belkin... and longer life as well. You pays a bit more money, but you spread that cost out over a couple of years of peace of mind and the cost disappears.

    Test all your active connections on some sort of schedule, such as once per hour, using Internet Frog (free download) and see what speeds you get on everything.

    We strongly recommend that all devices be of the same brand...

    I suspect you will be amazed at how easy it sets up and how fast it all works together.

    Now, if you have a house that has a lot of foil strips mixed into the plaster, or stucco walls, there might be a change in thinking... as some of that stuff is pure trouble.

    I would also experiment a lot of small moves of related equipment... about 10 inches each time you move it... and keep it at least a foot away from the wall if you use wireless... Test for interference from radios or neighbors electronic equipment.

    If you do not go wireless, check all your cable plugs. Nearly all cable works well, but those darn connectors on the end can really slow things up if they are poorly installed by a local technician. If they look hand made, spend a little money on good cable that is CAT5 Plenum grade, or preferably Cat6. We have seen cheap cables and sockets foul up a lot of otherwise good setups.

    Regardless of what you use, we find that DLink, Netgear, and LinkSys beat most other setups, long term... if the cables are also good. Belkin stuff can vary a great deal from batch to batch, and Hawking is also marginal. If money is an issue, consider TrendNet, but don't shortchange yourself on the cables or connectors.

    Be aware that some home firewall software can be trouble as well.
  5. the grip

    the grip TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 26

    Thank you so much that was extremely informative. I think I'll work on the home system first and if I still need a boost I'll definetly go with the D-Link. Thanks again
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