World Jump Day

By mephisto_007
Jul 7, 2005
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.

  1. More info at www.worldjumpday.org


    This is gonna be one huge fun events, too bad I didn't live in one of those Time Zone range...
  2. abcd

    abcd Newcomer, in training

    The World Jump Day...probably a Hoax in disguise!

    No matter how exciting this sounds, its not in accordance with the fundamentals of nature.
    well...its pretty simple...when you are jumping you are landing back on earth which means there is no net force to generate enough momentum to displace the earth travelling with an orbital velocity of 29.8km/s within those 1-2 seconds of the jump...unless you have those 600 million ppl jump across the earth's atmospheric boundary with a velocity greater than the terminal velocity, i think.

    I want to know what other ppl think?
  3. mephisto_007

    mephisto_007 Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 304

    They gotta have some scientific proven to be able to get this far, I'm pretty sure they can do it... Just a matter of how many people are going to participate in this events... Btw I hate doing science, but I love it... Hmmm am I contradict myself? :stickout:
  4. LNCPapa

    LNCPapa TS Special Forces Posts: 4,201   +229

    I don't know even if it were proven that I'd want to jump to move the earth out of rotation. I like Earth just where it is and I'd rather not stray off course. :)
  5. mephisto_007

    mephisto_007 Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 304

    Well if it only take us just 1 jump to reduce the global warming, why da hell not? I'm going for it...
  6. Eleventeen

    Eleventeen Newcomer, in training Posts: 70

    It would be fun if the earth goes offcourse, and into the sun (apart from the massive heat). Or maybe colide into another planet. Woo hoo. :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:
  7. mephisto_007

    mephisto_007 Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 304

    Lolz now that is some scary ****... :bounce: :dead: :angel:
  8. Zour

    Zour Newcomer, in training

    Ahhh yes this is technically possible using the formula Force = Mass x Acceleration. Lets say one person jumps at a weight of 45kilograms.
    Force = 45kg x 9.8m/s (the acceleration due to gravity). So the force that is exerted on you is 441 newtons. Assuming newtons third law is correct. Which states that every action has an equal and opposite reaction. We can say 441 newtons= the mass of the earth x acceleration. or 441 newtons = (5.974 x 10^24 kg) x acceleration. Which means that the acceleration of 441 newtons on the earth is 7.3x 10^-23 m/s. Or 2 protons per second. Multiply this by 600 million and you almost have the earth off course by an entire atom!! Isn't science exciting?
  9. Spike

    Spike Newcomer, in training Posts: 2,371

    Not posible - not even an atom.

    The force exerted in jumping is equal to the force exerted on the earth by landing. As both forces operate in opposite directions, they cancel each other out (don't blame me, blame Newton).
  10. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 10,067   +13

    what if D-O-G really spelled C-A-T ?

    Hmmmmmmmmmmmm
  11. toffeapple

    toffeapple Newcomer, in training Posts: 216

    who would win in a fight a three legged dog with a spear for a tail or a one eyed cat?
  12. zephead

    zephead TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,483

    ahh, them scientists are full of s***, 6 billion people don't weigh enough to affect the earth.
  13. Vigilante

    Vigilante TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,120

    There must be a thousand other variables. Like for example would all 600 million people have to be standing next to each other in like one big mass? Or 600mil anywhere within a large radius? What about altitute and thus different pressures? What about the material of earth? For example if someone jumps and lands on sand, that would be less force against earth then a person on concrete, where his weight is spread over a larger area.

    I'm not very scientific, I don't know any fancy formulas, but picture this okay?

    600 million people, all standing next to each other, at 0 altitute, on a hard surface of earth. Everyone jumped the same height and landed at the same time. Now how does an "impact" like that, compare to, say, a meteor hitting? Like what would the diameter be of 600 million people standing in a circle? Picture all those people as like a big hammer against earth.

    What is interresting is, when two objects collide with equal force, they cancel each other out. This HAS to be, or else one object would always be pushing the other object to move. Also, if one object is stationary, and able to resist certain forces, it can't be moved. Like if you put both your hands together in front of you and push equally with both arms so that your hands stay still, this is equal force. But then walk up to a block wall and lean on it. If you're leaning 20 pounds against the wall, it is pushing 20 pounds back at you. If you push 150 pounds, it pushes 150 pounds. So until you push more then it can resist, it will stay still and neither of you will move. But if you push 1000 pounds, that wall may push over, and you don't cancel each other out anymore.

    So then, what possible difference can ONE person do, jumping? And then multiply that by 600 million. The earth, by far, has enough resistance to cancel such force. Especially if the force is spread over so much space as "western hemisphere".

    It is interresting to think about though :)
     
  14. AtK SpAdE

    AtK SpAdE TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 1,846

    A very good point..
  15. zephead

    zephead TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,483

    when you jump, all of your kinetic energy is transfereed to whetever you're standing on, whether it be sand or concrete. if the material beneath your feet compresses/crushes it can absorb some or all of the hit. sand does not compress.
  16. Spike

    Spike Newcomer, in training Posts: 2,371

    but whatever you stand on, wherever you are, the answer remains the same.

    The total energy exerted on going upwards equals the total energy exerted when going downwards. It's simply newtonian physics.
  17. Vigilante

    Vigilante TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,120

    Yes but what about the impact itself? I mean, if you jump and hit the ground with 400 pounds of force, surely it didn't take 400 pounds of force against the earth to get you up in the air. Or does it?
  18. Spike

    Spike Newcomer, in training Posts: 2,371

    I does, though it's slightly more complicated if you look at it in fine detail as it will involve a variety of different forms of energy conversion etc, but when it's all added up, it comes out the same, as "every action has an equal and opposite reaction" :)

    Imagine you weigh 200 pounds.

    You would have to expend 200 pounds of force simply to stand on the ground. To get off into the air, lets say you require another 200 pounds of force, which would take you far enough into the air to land with 200 pounds of force plus your own weight of 200 pounds, and so it's 400 pounds from jumping to 400 pounds on landing.

    Even if you were to climb on something (which would certainly complicate things!!!) the force used to climb is equal to additional force from hitting the floor again.

    Of course, it goes into energy conversion from various forms to other various forms, gravitation, etc, etc, but essentially it works out the same due to equal and opposite reactions to whatever you do.
  19. hewybo

    hewybo TechSpot Maniac Posts: 570

    pound sand


    After 20 odd years in the paving business, I can assure you that sand does, indeed, compress. Sand is crushed (or eroded) rock. Using a vibratory compacting device, and with the optimum moisture content (very low %) you can make sand quite stable, especially extremely fine sand (crusher dust). In fact, it can become almost as stable as the rock from whence it came.




    witless is bliss
  20. toffeapple

    toffeapple Newcomer, in training Posts: 216

    by your logical then the actual jump its self would "expell" enough force to move the planet???? your reasoning is correct but the actual application of it is nonsense... too many variables..
    its all complete b*llox IF if if if if..

    ....if your Aunt had balls she'd be your uncle...no offence like
  21. hewybo

    hewybo TechSpot Maniac Posts: 570

    World flame day?

    What if 600 million people in the western hemisphere simultaneously farted, and 600 million people in the eastern hemisphere simultaneously LIT A MATCH??!!




    witless is bliss
  22. toffeapple

    toffeapple Newcomer, in training Posts: 216

    excellent point...taking into account Oprah Wimphrey's 18th law of thermo dymanic structual explosive methane law it would be possible to float the planet nearer to the sun so we all get better tans..sounds like a plan
  23. zephead

    zephead TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,483

    sand will settle and what have you, but the grains retain thier mass and shape. railroad engineers will dump sand under the drive wheels of a train for traction because of this.
  24. hewybo

    hewybo TechSpot Maniac Posts: 570

    Sand that is not interfered with will settle, it's true. Sand under the massive weight of a locomotive becomes instant dust, thus proving a brief period of increased friction. Still- sand can be compressed. I would also posit that the grains plced under that train DO NOT retain individual mass and shape.
  25. Vigilante

    Vigilante TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,120

    My my where this thread has gone!

    How about this: Why don't they just go out in a desert someplace and set up 600 million impact machines. Then let all the machines slam the earch with far more force then a person jumping, could?

    Or maybe, how about explosives? If the force exherted jumping is the same as that of landing, surely the force of an explosive against the earch doesn't equal the few pounds that make up the explosive. Assuming the force of the blast can be directed strait down.
    Or suppose a bunch of rockets, flew up and then dropped tons upon tons of metal onto the earth. Being that it is dropped from the air, there is no opposing force of the object leaving; on top of gravity and acceleration, can surely hit the earth with as much force.

    But then again, if the force of jumping equals the force of landing, wouldn't that just mean that the earth is being pushed twice? Once for jumping and once for landing? And with a second or two in between, that would turn the impact of 600 million people in to 1.2 billion impacts wouldn't it?
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.