Google eBookstore launches with more than 3 million titles

By on December 6, 2010, 10:02 AM
As expected, Google has launched a digital store called Google eBookstore that will provide Google eBooks in the US. The search giant is claiming it has the largest collection of ebooks in the world: more than 3 million titles, hundreds of thousands of which are available for sale. The company has partnered with independent booksellers that will sell Google eBooks: Powell's, Alibris, and participating members of the American Booksellers Association.

Google eBooks is compatible with laptops, netbooks, tablets, smartphones, and e-readers. The Google eBooks Web Reader lets a user buy, store, and read Google eBooks in the cloud. All you need to do is sign up for a free Google account and you'll get unlimited storage for your digital books. Google is also planning on releasing free apps for Android and Apple devices to buy electronic books and read them on the go. Many books will let you select a font, font size, line spacing, day or night reading mode, and let you pick up on the page where you left off when switching devices.

Since Google launched Google Books in 2004, the search giant has digitized more than 15 million books from more than 35,000 publishers, more than 40 libraries, and more than 100 countries in more than 400 languages. That information is available via Google Books search in the research section alongside the ebookstore.





User Comments: 3

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fastvince said:

Finally..the death of the paperback book!! I think people will still want hard backed books to keep in their personal libraries at home.

topcoach said:

When the article said you could read eBooks in the cloud, did it mean you can't download the book and read it offline? It would be very limiting if you always have to be connected to wifi to read a book, and your batteries would wear down fast.

matrix86 matrix86 said:

topcoach said:

When the article said you could read eBooks in the cloud, did it mean you can't download the book and read it offline? It would be very limiting if you always have to be connected to wifi to read a book, and your batteries would wear down fast.

That raises a good question. But I think you could save it to a phisical location, and also save it in the cloud. Because last time I checked, there's no internet connection at the beach...or the park. Now maybe if you had a 3g/4g enabled reader you could access it...I guess, lol.

Would this work on ANY eReader, though? Like the Kindle (tied to Amazon) or the Nook (tied to B&N)?

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