Major US ISPs joining RIAA, MPAA to punish pirates

By on June 23, 2011, 4:13 PM

Several top US Internet service providers are collaborating with the entertainment industry to clamp down on piracy, according to a CNET report. After years of being hounded by groups such as the MPAA and RIAA, Internet gatekeepers including AT&T, Comcast and Verizon are reportedly on the verge of introducing a graduated response system to punish pirates. CNET's sources claim that a final agreement hasn't been inked yet, but the plan is "on track" to be unveiled next month.

Although "graduated response" probably evokes memories of France's three-strike policy, the American adaptation won't be quite as strict -- initially, anyway. France's HADOPI law requires ISPs to warn alleged copyright infringers of their conduct two times. The third time someone is caught transferring unapproved content, they can be suspended from the Internet (the offender is blacklisted from all Web providers), fined hundreds of thousands of dollars and face up to two years in prison.

Conversely, the arrangement between American ISPs and the recording industry is voluntary, and suspected infringers won't necessarily face three strikes. According to CNET's unnamed insiders, ISPs will be able to choose how many warnings they want to issue before terminating a customer's service. If a rightsholder logs your IP address downloading or sharing unsavory material, they can notify your ISP, who will bombard you with so-called "Copyright Alerts."

If you fail to comply with those warnings, the recording industry will expect your ISP to escalate matters by selecting from a list of sanctions. Depending on the severity of the case, you might have your connection throttled or you could even be limited to the top 200 websites. Although it's not necessarily required, ISPs may also disconnect you from their service entirely, but this already occurs in select areas where ISPs have agreed to cooperate with antipiracy groups.

It's unclear what the framework will cost to implement and oversee, but both sides are reportedly splitting the expenses. Representatives for the RIAA, MPAA, and NCTA (National Cable and Telecommunications Association, which includes Time Warner Cable, CableVision, Charter, Comcast and Qwest), declined CNET's request for a comment. Unfortunately, it seems most ISPs are involved in the discussions, so you probably won't be able to escape the arrangement.




User Comments: 55

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freedomthinker said:

I can't really post a major argument . But damn , sucks for you guys in the US . This is kinda retarded . 2 years in prison ? Freedom my ass . Haha , seriously the more i read the news , the more the US government and big businesses gain even larger quantities of power and control over you guys. Awesome ~!

mccartercar said:

TOR Onion Network....Point Moot

KG363 KG363 said:

ISP's shouldn't care

SNGX1275 SNGX1275, TS Forces Special, said:

I'm able to 'escape' it. My ISP seems to serve a very limited area along the stretch of I-44 in Missouri and perhaps Oklahoma.

I don't have the access to the cheap fast speeds most everyone else in the US does, but I guess the tradeoff is my ISP isn't negotiating with the **AAs.

TOR Onion Network....Point Moot

I'm speaking with some ignorance on this so perhaps I'm wrong. But I was under the impression that if you were going to do some questionable things such as downloading movies or music by using TOR it would take a lot longer, ie the dl speeds are terrible. Also, that the more people that started using it for such activities where files are often in the GB range, things would only get slower.

Mizzou Mizzou said:

It's unclear what the framework will cost to implement and oversee, but both sides are reportedly splitting the expenses.

Translation, the consumer will ultimately be the one that ends up paying to cover these expenses.

Guest said:

to: freedomthinker

So much for a self-proclaimed "thinker." The 2-year prison example refers to France, not the US. Learn to read before spilling your pretentious banality.

Guest said:

I can't really post a major argument . But damn , sucks for you guys in the US . This is kinda retarded . 2 years in prison ? Freedom my *** . Haha , seriously the more i read the news , the more the US government and big businesses gain even larger quantities of power and control over you guys. Awesome ~!

Read it again. That paragraph refers to France laws. D'oh!

Darkshadoe Darkshadoe said:

Downloading illegally does not "stick it to the man" as so many think. It just makes them do retarded crap like this. If you really want to hurt them, don't buy their products til it comes down to a reasonable price. Force them to drop their prices. Its simple and legal. You DONT have to have that game, movie or song the day it comes out and they do make more.

I'm all for busting these greedy corporations down a peg, but there are better means than getting myself or others in legal trouble.

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Will they impose sanctions like the UN? Essential goods only, but no luxury resources? You can check your e-mail, but can't access Hulu?

PinothyJ said:

Unfortunately, it seems most ISPs are involved in the discussions, so you probably won't be able to escape the arrangement.
Except if you are not living in the USA .

Go win...

Cota Cota said:

Wow, that must be death penalty to a "social network" addict, but to come to think to what we have ended. I never tough i was gona say this, but good thing every thing is legal in Mexico.

H3llion H3llion, TechSpot Paladin, said:

kg363 said:

ISP's shouldn't care

Well if that was the case, ISP could be sued by these big corporations...

Anyway 2 warnings and then you busted? Sounds good to me

howzz1854 said:

seriously, lower the prices, and there won't be any pirating going on. recent study i've read from google news have shown that average software price is well above average income of consumer, and that's just in developed country like ours. in developing countries, it's way over consumers' spending capability. and they wonder why China and India can't stop the fluid of piracy. with steam's increasing popular weekly blow-out sales, gamers are finding better deals and less reason to pirate. just my 2c.

Guest said:

What they should do is clamp down prices. I will be to honest, I'm not poor, but if I had to pay for every movie, song, game, etc than I use every year (not a library I swear) it will be a huge punch to my economy because of how ridicolous ammount of money it would be. Piracy is wrong, so their prices.

aj_the_kidd said:

Guest said:

What they should do is clamp down prices. I will be to honest, I'm not poor, but if I had to pay for every movie, song, game, etc than I use every year (not a library I swear) it will be a huge punch to my economy because of how ridicolous ammount of money it would be. Piracy is wrong, so their prices.

Like the idea will probably the end result after this "mess" is over and done with. Personally i would just like content to be more readily available, very limited where i live for what i want.

Modena said:

They need to lower the cost of their crap media and we will pay accordingly. I'm not gonna pay $30 to watch whatever movie in 3D and have it suck on top of it. IMO ISP's should have zero say in what we view or download. Most are already putting up caps on how much we can use per month, now they're also going to ban us for using it how we want? If anything they are the ones stealing from us with 95% of the media out the game/movies being complete garbage.

PinothyJ said:

Guest said:

What they should do is clamp down prices. I will be to honest, I'm not poor, but if I had to pay for every movie, song, game, etc than I use every year (not a library I swear) it will be a huge punch to my economy because of how ridiculous amount of money it would be. Piracy is wrong, so their prices.

This is crap. I live in Australia where our prices are stupidly high for no reason than to profit the suppliers and we do fine. Hell, one of my best mate is completely broke yet still has money to buy movies and games out the yin-yang: however many dvd/blurays it takes to fill a large bookshelf, double tiered, two display stands and a medium sized bookshelf, not to mention the pile next to the tv. So you cannot really complain that your life is so horrible because of the prices of the media that you desire.

I personally spend my money on other things, but that is for another thread...

Lionvibez said:

Wow thank god I live in Canada!

I guess now we can say Blame America

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

So "Big Brother" really is watching. There's a f****** big surprise.

Tekkaraiden Tekkaraiden said:

lionvibez said:

Wow thank god I live in Canada!

I guess now we can say Blame America

Rogers and Bell will likely try to do the same, heck they both already attempted to cap bandwidth even getting the CRTC on their side.

SNGX1275 SNGX1275, TS Forces Special, said:

They need to lower the cost of their crap media and we will pay accordingly. I'm not gonna pay $30 to watch whatever movie in 3D and have it suck on top of it. IMO ISP's should have zero say in what we view or download. Most are already putting up caps on how much we can use per month, now they're also going to ban us for using it how we want? If anything they are the ones stealing from us with 95% of the media out the game/movies being complete garbage.

I agree. Apparently now we give service providers policing powers?

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

They need to lower the cost of their crap media and we will pay accordingly. I'm not gonna pay $30 to watch whatever movie in 3D and have it suck on top of it. IMO ISP's should have zero say in what we view or download. Most are already putting up caps on how much we can use per month, now they're also going to ban us for using it how we want? If anything they are the ones stealing from us with 95% of the media out the game/movies being complete garbage.
The trouble is, now that the IPS will be policing the internet with the media providers, both sides have no incentive whatsoever to lower prices. In fact, they'll probably raise them. They used to call s*** like this a monopoly. Now I suppose, they can get away with calling it a "consortium".

But I suppose the good little sheep will go along with it, instead of boycotting it altogether.

Where have all the windbags gone that shouted, "death to Blockbuster"? Blockbuster and Redbox, could turn out to be your only escape from this nonsense.

lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Wait, so let me get this straight. ISPs are joining the RIAA and MPAA, to monitor, and consequently punish "illegal" file sharing. Now, isn't that a major violation of the customer's privacy? How can they, both morally and legally, be allowed to even plan on doing this? Did I miss something?

Guest said:

since when do you think your ISP is worried about what moral, ethical, or really even legal for that matter? I can think of many things that several things these companies do that just barely scrapes any of those and they don't even get a second look by good ol gov't. This same statement goes for MPAA and RIAA also.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

since when do you think your ISP is worried about what moral, ethical, or really even legal for that matter? I can think of many things that several things these companies do that just barely scrapes any of those and they don't even get a second look by good ol gov't. This same statement goes for MPAA and RIAA also.
All of those organizations you've mentioned, contribute far more than you or I do to election campaigns.

That said, The RIAA particularly has been diligently trying to re legislate copyright law in the courts also. It seems to be working. And with that said, even the ACLU might have a difficult time trying to prove that stopping piracy violates anyone's civil rights. I'm jus' sayin'.

aj_the_kidd said:

enjoy the freedom whilst you can

IAMTHESTIG said:

RIAA and MPAA are a bunch of greedy, money grabbing morons. Look, I respect copyrights and all but these guys seem to ignore the two main reasons people 'pirate'. 1. It's easy, convenient, and non-restricted. And 2, it's free!

If these ****** would get it into their little one-track minds that if you make music and movies easy to find and download, non-DRM protected so it's easy to transfer to other devices, and made the prices reasonable then you would get a lot less people stealing crap. Since Amazon.com has DRM free MP3's I buy all my music from them. However movies and TV shows are still not available like music is.... and netflix is not an answer. I don't want to stream, I wan't to download and save it on my media server so I don't have to rely on an internet connection.

So RIAA and MPAA, stop being a bunch of greedy dicks. Embrace the internet and use it to make money in a way consumers will enjoy. Plenty of other companies have figured this out, get out of the 20th century and make us want to buy your products.

Guest said:

Uh, try to cap it? They've had it capped for the past few years now and more lol xD

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

So RIAA and MPAA, stop being a bunch of greedy dicks. Embrace the internet and use it to make money in a way consumers will enjoy. Plenty of other companies have figured this out, get out of the 20th century and make us want to buy your products.

Well first, that would be in direct opposition to basic human nature. And second,, some people enjoy tractor pulls and "Big Foot".So there you have it, there's no accounting for taste, and companies play that card every time they can.

Mindwraith said:

another reason why im glad that i dont live in America

Australia may be technologicaly backwards, but at least it means our government doesnt have the slightest idea about how to stop piracy or catch people who do it

Guest said:

Why should ISP's even care? To them, the RIAA and such should be like a little dog that constantly nips at their heels until they finally kick it away. You don't reward that sort of behavior by giving a dog what it wants. Why would you reward a big, hungry monstrosity of a corporation? Damn.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

another reason why im glad that i dont live in America

Australia may be technologicaly backwards, but at least it means our government doesnt have the slightest idea about how to stop piracy or catch people who do it

And we can tell the Australia is, "technologicaly backwards", since you can't spell, "technologically". Ah, you forgot one of the "elles", no biggie.

But theoretically speaking, is a government that can't catch pirates because it is technologically backwards, a good thing. Or is it a bad thing that merely defaults to a good thing?

God save the Queen!

slamscaper slamscaper said:

It scares me to think about the methods the so-called "copyright holders" will begin to use to monitor user traffic. Sooner or later, they will not be satisfied with simply logging all the IP's they find downloading a torrent.

Where's this going next? Will they ask the ISP's to place keyloggers on a (suspected) pirate's PC? Where's the line? At what point do your rights become violated?

Instead of taking this route, the MPAA\RIAA should be putting all their effort into spreading the word in regards to the consequences of piracy. For example, do to the fact that pirates have illegally downloaded so many Britney Spears songs, she had to downgrade to a Gulfstream 4. What's the big deal you ask? She used to have a Gulfstream 5... Still want to download free music? Didn't think so...

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Instead of taking this route, the MPAA\RIAA should be putting all their effort into spreading the word in regards to the consequences of piracy.
By making this statement, can I conclude that you've never actually watched a DVD? Because they certainly, "spread the word" on infringement there.
For example, do to the fact that pirates have illegally downloaded so many Britney Spears songs, she had to downgrade to a Gulfstream 4. What's the big deal you ask? She used to have a Gulfstream 5... Still want to download free music? Didn't think so...
Well, The Britster took off a couple of years to have a couple of ugly kids, had a nervous breakdown, forgot how to dance, got a bigger ***, and hung around with zero talent coke skank Paris Hilton. Do you think that had anything to do with a drop, (however temporary), in record sales? All of that notwithstanding, she didn't actually have that much talent in the first place. So no, I have no intention of downloading any of her current crap. Nor do I have any intention of helping out "poor Britney", by paying for any of her "music" either.

ramonsterns said:

pinothyj said:

I personally spend my money on other things, but that is for another thread...

And thus your point is rendered moot, isn't it?

Just because one person you know likes to throw away money doesn't mean everything is fine.

slamscaper slamscaper said:

By making this statement, can I conclude that you've never actually watched a DVD? Because they certainly, "spread the word" on infringement there.

No, you misunderstood. It's obvious that the ominous FBI warning posted at the beginning of every DVD movie has done virtually nothing to deter piracy. I'm saying that they should take a different approach to fighting piracy that would highlight the aftermath of it from the celebrities point of view.

I mean, folks might think twice about downloading that free song after they hear that Lars Ulrich wasn't able to afford the gold-plated cocktail bar he wanted for his pool area this month, but instead has to wait a few months before he can purchase it due to all the money he's lost from users downloading his band's music illegally.

Once people realize that pirating movies and music will doom the celebs to a life of only semi-luxury, I think it'll be a huge wake-up call.

lol

Richy2k9 said:

hello ...

i already said so ... "it has begun !!!"

anyway, piracy isn't because of the price, but because of it's availability. The ISP could sanction the culprits, yet they don't do anything to prevent them doing so.

Alternative routes exists & yet not safe, there is no anonymity on the net! hackers on 1 hand & pirates on the other hand are pushing corporates & sometimes directly the governments to make pressure over ISPs & new laws will be set, it's only the beginning.

Tor or whatever other network 'private' have their flaws! It's not the price, for i've seen some students prefer download cracked games instead of buying same for cheap on steamy site & alike, i've seen rich patrons wishing to crack their consoles instead of buying original games, even cheap ones .. it's just their way of thinking, it is available, there's a way i can get it for free, so there's no way i shall pay for so. what's weird, the time taken to download a pirated game is often longer than the time off legal sites for a small price & the difference over electricity bills make buying legit software a full win!

I'm against piracy where it shouldn't exist, i do not condone yet understand some reasons behind (like unavailability of a specific material (try to buy some old games that even GoG don't have, some music from some specific zone, or movies/tv series when you are in some islands) .. if i'm not going this way it's simple, i just don't want to & believe in rewarding people's of their work, even if it means waiting for a price drop, some special sales to get my hand on anything, for in the 1st place, i still don't have enough time for everything.

too bad, but it's like that ..

cheers!

Gallifrey2 said:

darkshadoe said:

Downloading illegally does not "stick it to the man" as so many think. It just makes them do retarded crap like this. If you really want to hurt them, don't buy their products til it comes down to a reasonable price. Force them to drop their prices. Its simple and legal. You DONT have to have that game, movie or song the day it comes out and they do make more.

I'm all for busting these greedy corporations down a peg, but there are better means than getting myself or others in legal trouble.

Exaclty, we do not buy DVD's or Blue Rays until they come down in price. If you are patient enough you can get most TV show box sets for 19.99 per season. Movies usually go down to the less then 15 dollar range too. It is even better if you know others that pick up box sets or movies that you don't have and you can swap with them. No need to download as there are many other options now.

Best thing to do is not purchase the products at the outragous prices. That is the ulitmate form of sticking it to the man. It is our money, if we don't like the prices, don't buy them.

Guest said:

piracy will never end, this just gives pirates an excuse to find an new form of P2P that is un traceable. Pirates will adapt and find ways around this nonsense.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

No, you misunderstood. It's obvious that the ominous FBI warning posted at the beginning of every DVD movie has done virtually nothing to deter piracy. I'm saying that they should take a different approach to fighting piracy that would highlight the aftermath of it from the celebrities point of view.
Yeah right.

I mean, folks might think twice about downloading that free song after they hear that Lars Ulrich wasn't able to afford the gold-plated cocktail bar he wanted for his pool area this month, but instead has to wait a few months before he can purchase it due to all the money he's lost from users downloading his band's music illegally.

Once people realize that pirating movies and music will doom the celebs to a life of only semi-luxury, I think it'll be a huge wake-up call.

Not to mention that the Aptly named, (rather pronounced), "Robin Leach", would have to find a job that didn't involve shouting about how much they have. (Catch the back story here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Leach ).

Pretty much the entertainment industry social / economic dynamic is modeled after a tick on the a** of a tick on the a** , of a tick on the a**, ad naseum. I mean really, "paparazzi" literally means "stinging insect". The last a** in the sequence belongs to you and I,

On some levels, you can't defend celebrity excess wealth, since they oftentimes get worse as their "art matures". This is true a lot with musical acts. Hence the term, "one hit wonders". Then there's the Charlie Sheen saga.. The pubic's stupidity got him more than a half million bucks for each 22 minutes of actual product.

(I spelled "public's" wrong? Not really).

amstech amstech, TechSpot Enthusiast, said:

Any ISP that starts to offer layers of restriction will force thier customers onto another ISP.

People aren't going to pay for internet if they can't use it the way they want.

amstech amstech, TechSpot Enthusiast, said:

If Time Warner told me tonight they are limiting my service based off my browsing, I would not be with them tomorrow.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Any ISP that starts to offer layers of restriction will force thier customers onto another ISP.

People aren't going to pay for internet if they can't use it the way they want.

If Time Warner told me tonight they are limiting my service based off my browsing, I would not be with them tomorrow.
Well, first off, learn to use the edit button, rather than serially posting fairy tail hopes and outcomes.

All of this presumes someone has another ISP to run to, and that that ISP will look the other way at your convenience.

treetops treetops said:

No wonder netflix is killing the competition, the competition is wasting money on isp's instead of providing affordable service.

treetops treetops said:

@freedomthinker thats france not america

Guest said:

Look at the overfilled U.S. prison system, there's no room for this nonsense. Maybe the U.S. will legalize pot, let the pot smokers out of jail and replace them with downloader criminals. Let the MPAA, the RIAA build some illegal downloader prisons. How about if your caught your sentence is dail-up for life. Sheez, can't we all just get along.

MilwaukeeMike said:

Want to know why they don't provide you the songs/movies/etc for cheap? There are more middle men and everyone wants a cut. Make an album and the studio and artist sell it to best buy and divide up the money. But they can't do that with an mp3. They'll have to have a contract with Apple to sell the song on iTunes and right now that price that keeps everyone happy is $1. What price would make people not want to steal it? 25 cents? 10 cents? Anything probably under 85 cents and Apple probably won't be interested in selling it unless they get to keep their 75 cents or whatever, and the studio won't agree to only gettin 10... see how this goes? it's why spotify has had so much trouble getting studios on board.

And you can't say... just make it free.. blah blah blah... we NEED the ability for people to become rich. it's a conerstone of innovation. There's a general lack of innovation in the USA right now because so much talent has gone into the financial industry, and that leaves fewer and fewer smart people to design our next electric car or fusion reactor or iPod or tablet. If you want cool and innovative stuff the people who make it have to be able to make money. If they can't make tons of money we won't have anymore blockbuster high-budget movies (at least not good ones), we'll all be stuck watching Fried Green Tomatoes.

They're not going to make 'better' stuff and charge less anymore than you're going to go to work this Saturday for free just so your boss likes you more.

Trillionsin Trillionsin said:

slamscaper said:

It scares me to think about the methods the so-called "copyright holders" will begin to use to monitor user traffic. Sooner or later, they will not be satisfied with simply logging all the IP's they find downloading a torrent.

Where's this going next? Will they ask the ISP's to place keyloggers on a (suspected) pirate's PC? Where's the line? At what point do your rights become violated?

Instead of taking this route, the MPAA\RIAA should be putting all their effort into spreading the word in regards to the consequences of piracy. For example, do to the fact that pirates have illegally downloaded so many Britney Spears songs, she had to downgrade to a Gulfstream 4. What's the big deal you ask? She used to have a Gulfstream 5... Still want to download free music? Didn't think so...

LOL isnt this from a south park episode or something???

Guest said:

I imagine paying to consume every episode of never ending running series of watching movies that turn out to be garbage (which is most of them) there simple isn't enough money going around. It's just junk data that gets put out at for passive TV watching.

Quite simple they overcharge for their products which are worth at most $1- $3 per DVD\CD.

This will never happen but people should stop falling victim to marketing and product hype campaign's and stop buying this sh*t in droves.

And now the internet is also being flooded with damn advertisements before every video we watch, they want to turn this into cable tv 2.0 and lock us into a pay on demand to read news and watch shows etc. DO NOT FALL VICTIM TO THIS SCARE CAMPAIGN, IF YOUR ISP IS ON THE LIST AND YOU CAN LEAVE THEM, DO SO! Hit them in the pocket and they'll give the finger to RIAA\MPAA

tipstir tipstir, TS Ambassador, said:

They're loosing profits.. Movies with 3D cost too much I do agree it's like $15 per adult here and $12 bucks for kids. If you have 6 kids and you and the wife how much is that? $102 just to get in. Let's not forget the price to buy refreshments. I got netflix for a gift for 1 year. I must say I can stream that to my Android Tablets and watch anything on it any where even out in the woods up a tree house!

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