AMD A10-5800K overclocked to 7.38 GHz using new MSI motherboard

By on October 8, 2012, 12:00 PM

MSI sends word today that AMD’s second generation A10-5800K desktop APU has recently been overclocked to record-setting levels. The chip was coaxed to 7.38GHz using an MSI FM2-A85XA-G65 and a custom liquid nitrogen cooling solution. The overclock can be verified using the CPU-Z validation database.

MSI’s press release is light on details but we can gather some more data from the CPU-Z screenshot. Of interest is the fact that 1.968 volts were required to reach 7.38GHz. In our recent review of the A10-5800K, a traditional air cooling solution allowed Steve to push the CPU up to 4.5GHz using 1.5 volts – an 18 percent increase over the stock 3.8GHz base frequency.

We also learn that a multiplier of 62 was used with a bus speed of 119.11MHz to reach their goal. Two 4GB sticks of G.Skill DDR3 memory were used as well, clocked at 794.1MHz with timings of 9-9-9-24.

Astute viewers may have noticed that the high clock speed was reached with only two cores enabled despite the fact that this is a quad-core processor. Disabling extra cores for extreme overclocking purposes is common practice which shouldn’t detract from the accomplishment.

It goes without saying that extreme tests like this aren’t exactly indicative of what the average user can expect to get out of their CPU. Liquid nitrogen certainly isn’t a sustainable cooling method but it is interesting to see what hardware can accomplish when it is super cooled by experts for maximum clock testing like this.




User Comments: 10

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Littleczr Littleczr said:

Nice. Ill just buy the liquid nitrogen tomorrow and everyday after that.

Khanonate said:

What about the integrated graphics? Was it disabled or overclocked too?

LinkedKube LinkedKube, TechSpot Project Baby, said:

Here they go with these weird naming structures again. 5800k, hmm sounds remotely close to umm.

Guest said:

How about the performance?

Guest said:

Ok, let's translate that performance to real world usage...

wait, bulldozer and steamroller still s****d.

Zoltan Head said:

Don't see why liquid nitrogen cooling isn't sustainable - quite a bit of nitrogen left in the atmosphere!

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

Don't see why liquid nitrogen cooling isn't sustainable - quite a bit of nitrogen left in the atmosphere!

Condensation. :eek:

Regardless if the insulation is knead eraser, silicon grease/liquid electrical tape or dragon skin, condensation will sooner or later become a factor- especially in area's (DIMM slots for example) where complete insulation is nigh impossible without degrading the electrical contact.

Of course the more pedantic might say that you could house a (solid cap) motherboard in a Dewar flask full of liquid nitrogen, but then you're faced with 1. Decreasing capacitance, and 2. Degradation of any connection running to/from the motherboard if that were indeed possible

Zoltan Head said:

Condensation. :eek:

Regardless if the insulation is knead eraser, silicon grease/liquid electrical tape or dragon skin, condensation will sooner or later become a factor- especially in area's (DIMM slots for example) where complete insulation is nigh impossible without degrading the electrical contact.

Of course the more pedantic might say that you could house a (solid cap) motherboard in a Dewar flask full of liquid nitrogen, but then you're faced with 1. Decreasing capacitance, and 2. Degradation of any connection running to/from the motherboard if that were indeed possible

No, that only explains why it's impractical (which I totally agree with). I said it is sustainable, as lots of nitrogen in atmosphere.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

Yeah. With an infinite number of motherboards- given that the life span for a sub-zero board can be a matter of minutes, and generally wouldn't last out a warranty period in a best case scenario. So it would then follow that you'd need an infinite amount of Tantalum and Gold for example- assuming a less than perfect (I.e. real world) reclamation process.

If you're being pedantic with the definition of sustainable- and you seem to be, then yes, it is sustainable with the aforementioned infinite amount of boards. I'd leave aside the CPU issue, since pedantry would likely argue the point of sub-zero cooling without recourse to overvolting/overclocking outside of vendor VID guidelines.

Zoltan Head said:

Yes, I am being pedantic (by your definition), I.e. I mean precisely what I say and no more or less.

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