Microsoft prohibits ESRB Mature, PEGI 18+ apps from Windows 8

By on October 11, 2012, 2:30 PM

According to Microsoft's published Windows 8 certification requirements, any app rated above PEGI 16 (European standard), ESRB Mature or otherwise contains content to warrant such a rating, will be prohibited from sale on the Windows Store. It's important to note this only affects Windows Store apps and not general Windows software acquired from third parties.

Additionally, metadata -- the publicly viewable information about said apps distributed through Microsoft's app store -- must also follow its own strict set of ratings guidelines. This means titles, descriptions, comments, screenshots and other information published to the Windows Store must not exceed suitability for children under the age of 13: PEGI 12, ESRB Everyone and Windows Store 12+.

Although both Google and Apple frequently block and remove apps with smutty or otherwise objectionable content, neither have a policies based on ESRB or PEGI content rating systems.

Recently, Microsoft and Windows 8 have been well-criticized for what appears to be Redmond's firming grip on third-party developers. Notch, the creator of Minecraft, was the latest prominent figure to express disappointment toward Windows 8 as Microsoft continues to distance itself from maintaining PCs as an open platform. Valve founder Gabe Newell had also voiced his dissatisfaction with the direction Windows is headed.

Although third-party Windows 8 development will remain mostly the same for desktop applications, Microsoft seems to be taking lessons from Apple when it comes to its app store. The Windows Store, much like the App Store or Google Play, will be the only sanctioned means to install software on Windows 8 RT (i.e. least expensive offerings with ARM processors). 

Despite Microsoft's firm measures of prohibiting objectionable content, it shouldn't be too hard for users to get their filthy porn fix though -- just fire up Microsoft's own Internet Explorer.




User Comments: 4

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ikesmasher said:

Why. whats the motive.

1 person liked this | TekGun TekGun said:

"Windows 8 RT (I.e. mainstream tablets)."

Shouldn't that be... Windows 8 RT (I.e. Tablets based on ARM)

Tablets based on other CPU's won't be restricted by these sanctions, it's almost like your trying to spread disinformation.

Staff
Rick Rick, TechSpot Staff, said:

"Windows 8 RT (I.e. mainstream tablets)."

Shouldn't that be... Windows 8 RT (I.e. Tablets based on ARM)

Tablets based on other CPU's won't be restricted by these sanctions, it's almost like your trying to spread disinformation.

The use of "mainstream" was intended to mean "attractively priced" -- not to misinform anyone. Thanks for pointing it out though. I changed the wording.

Yes, RT is only for ARM-based tablets. While many of our readers will know what that means, many also will not. I specifically avoided using ARM for that reason and tried to boil it down to what ARM really means to consumers: cheap tablets will have RT, expensive ones won't.

dotVezz said:

"Windows 8 RT (I.e. mainstream tablets)."

Shouldn't that be... Windows 8 RT (I.e. Tablets based on ARM)

Tablets based on other CPU's won't be restricted by these sanctions, it's almost like your trying to spread disinformation.

The use of "mainstream" was intended to mean "attractively priced" -- not to misinform anyone. Thanks for pointing it out though. I changed the wording.

Yes, RT is only for ARM-based tablets. While many of our readers will know what that means, many also will not. I specifically avoided using ARM for that reason and tried to boil it down to what ARM really means to consumers: cheap tablets will have RT, expensive ones won't.

It's actually kind of surprising how many consumers recognize what "ARM" is these days. Back in the days when the only mainstream devices to use ARM instruction sets were still relatively niche (Palm devices? HP iPAQ, anyone?), nobody had any idea what it all meant. But nowadays, because of Android and iOS devices all using ARM instructions and all, it means something to consumers.

Just sayin'

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