Microsoft: four million Windows 8 upgrades sold in four days

By on October 30, 2012, 2:00 PM

Windows 8's reception was something of a mixed bag with plenty of opinions in favor and against the new touch-centric interface that takes center stage over the classic Windows desktop. But that isn't stopping consumer adoption of the new OS, apparently. Speaking during his keynote address at the Build 2012 conference, CEO Steve Ballmer told attendees they've sold 4 million upgrades already.

That figure is understood to include individual purchases only as Ballmer also mentioned that “tens of millions” of Windows 8 upgrade units have been sold to corporate customers. According to the chief executive, the “level of interest and enthusiasm” for Windows 8 and the Surface has been “stunning”, although he didn't share any numbers for the latter.

Ballmer is hoping to convice more developers to create applications for its new operating system, as well as the Windows Phone 8 OS launched yesterday. 

So far, companies like Netflix, Hulu, Evernote and eBay have already contributed apps. Other upcoming apps from high-profile developers are being showcased at the event, including clients for Dropbox and Twitter, as well as a PayPal API that will allow developers to use the payment system within any Windows Store app.

Ballmer says that a year from now we’ll see close to 400 million new devices running Windows 8, making it "the single largest opportunity for software developers today." That's certainly a bold prediction considering Windows 7 has sold close to 700 million copies since its release in 2009. Microsoft is hoping that its entry into the tablet market will help bolster sales of its operating system cash cow even further this time around.




User Comments: 55

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1 person liked this | treeski treeski said:

How many Windows 7 licenses were sold in the same period?

1 person liked this | Guest said:

Big deal. Get back with me in a year and let me know how many copies it has sold by then. Stop trying to create hysteria off initial sales figures. That's probably all the people that actually want it.

700million-4million = 696million units to go just to match Windows 7 sales in 2 years. Let's not all pop the champagne bottle corks at once.

2 people like this | Guest said:

The internet never seems to run out of hilarious Ballmer pictures.

1 person liked this | Scavengers Scavengers said:

Small surprise. Once you get over the interface change and learn to set it up how you like it Windows 8 is just damn slick.

Dave

1 person liked this | Guest said:

"four million Windows 8 upgrades sold"

...Yeah, cuz full retail version is not even available! If you guys go check online, you'll also find just how misleading this whole Windows 8 is - Can't tell what is and upgrade version or not!

howzz1854 said:

Is it just me or if you put a square mustasch on the picture of the front title page, it becomes a very scary sight....

1 person liked this | Guest said:

Its a shame this number is counting ALL Windows 8 PCs. Including the ones sitting on store shelves, still unsold. Please stop misleading us and skewing information.

treeski treeski said:

It's crazy how much MS/Windows hatin' has been drawn to the site lately...

Camikazi said:

Its a shame this number is counting ALL Windows 8 PCs. Including the ones sitting on store shelves, still unsold. Please stop misleading us and skewing information.

Those are technically sold as far as MS is concerned since they already have the money. The problem of moving the machines to consumers falls on the stores that have them not MS really so I can see why they use that number although it is a bit misleading.

Guest said:

I got news for you brother. It ain't going anyway anytime soon either. So get used to it. :)

Littleczr Littleczr said:

I was not going to buy until some one here mention Star dock 8 and got the pro upgrade form Microsoft.com. So far I'm happy with it.

1 person liked this | howzz1854 said:

I got a version of the upgrade for $15 and haven't tried it yet. but honestly, I would never pay the full price for a full retail version. it's just too expensive.

Guest said:

If keep this tempo 4 day 4 million to be 2 years 730 million

Windows 7 sold 730 millon in first year

Guest said:

I'm almost ashamed to say I contributed to the 4 millions sold... lol

howzz1854 said:

Don't be ashamed... we'll probably all switch to 8 one day sooner or later. or Windows 9, which will just be an updated version of 9.

1 person liked this | tw0rld tw0rld said:

Been using windows 8 pro since September and I have no issues with it. Once you get use to the start screen it is really not a problem. I find it to be a lot more snappy and responsive. I would encourage anyone to get the upgrade if they are willing to deal with the learning curve that comes with not having a start menu. The world is changing and how people use their devices have change makes sense for Microsoft to make the shift too and I think that it is a good one.

tw0rld tw0rld said:

Another thing about Win 8 is there aren't any issues with hardware support. I for one have found that windows 8 has all the drivers built in for my Windows 7 computer, which I had to go to the lenovo's website to get the drivers. I thought that I would have issues finding drivers for windows 8, but all the drivers were there. Also I have had no software compatibility issues. All the applications that I used with & works on 8.

2 people like this | lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

It really shouldn't be a surprise:

Consumers see a shiny new thing, and they want it. And they get it.

I personally like W8. It's faster and more reliable. The Start Screen takes a bit to get used to but now I can safely say it is better than the Start button. I don't get too emotionally attached to products as some people on the Internet seem to get; I use the right tool for the job and that's it. The learning curve involved with using the Start Screen should be a testament of not only how daring Microsoft was for fundamentally changing the way we've been using Windows for decades, but equally, a firm statement that the time put into purposely designing something alongside the desktop--and made for touch to compete with Apple and Google--shows that stagnation can't be thing in the tech world. Unless you want to be RIM.

I came to this realization perhaps because I do like W8. And while I know the undesired effects of this transition will have people not liking Windows 8, I think it was necessary. Maybe we'll see competitors do touch interfaces on desktops to rival the success (?) of W8, which could inevitably yield different computing experiences and complete paradigm shifts. It's exciting because, I know the reason I (or some of you) don't own, say, a Linux PC is not necessarily because I love MS or Windows per se, but because the latter is simply the right tool for the job, which then leaves many of us more than willing to change that tool whenever the time comes.

This "spark" that is W8, will force competitors to innovate on spaces MS gambled on. And I hope that once we get to that point I can say: "Man, Windows 9 sucks when compared to X." I'm not eagerly anticipating that moment, just that when it happens I'll be ready.

For those who don't like it, the way I see it is this: if you don't like it, don't buy it. It won't stop millions around the world from buying it, but I guess repeating you hate it, or saying those who bought it will regret it makes you feel better about your decision? Is that how it works? I don't know. I think read about it on a sociology course, but, I digress...

Jim Rovertos Jim Rovertos said:

What needs a sociological course is why the masses would like to buy for something they are not allowed to own or share while the alternative is free to own and share!

If you have a relatively modern computer, Linux/KDE is the best option.KDE provides by far the most advanced customizable and powerful GUI of any kind! Different workspaces among different activities each with its own set of widgets and wallpapers! Kind of awesome.B

avoidz avoidz said:

In a year's time, I'd be interested to see some stats on the comparison of Windows 7 installs and WIndows 8 installs. I don't completely hate Windows 8 (the Start Screen still bites), but there's not a really compelling reason to upgrade right now.

Chazz said:

It really shouldn't be a surprise:

Consumers see a shiny new thing, and they want it. And they get it.

I personally like W8. It's faster and more reliable. The Start Screen takes a bit to get used to but now I can safely say it is better than the Start button. I don't get too emotionally attached to products as some people on the Internet seem to get; I use the right tool for the job and that's it. The learning curve involved with using the Start Screen should be a testament of not only how daring Microsoft was for fundamentally changing the way we've been using Windows for decades, but equally, a firm statement that the time put into purposely designing something alongside the desktop--and made for touch to compete with Apple and Google--shows that stagnation can't be thing in the tech world. Unless you want to be RIM.

I came to this realization perhaps because I do like W8. And while I know the undesired effects of this transition will have people not liking Windows 8, I think it was necessary. Maybe we'll see competitors do touch interfaces on desktops to rival the success (?) of W8, which could inevitably yield different computing experiences and complete paradigm shifts. It's exciting because, I know the reason I (or some of you) don't own, say, a Linux PC is not necessarily because you love MS or Windows per se, but because the latter is simply the right tool for the job, which then leaves many of us more than willing to change that tool whenever the time comes.

This "spark" that is W8, will force competitors to innovate on spaces MS gambled on. And I hope that once we get to that point I can say: "Man, Windows 9 sucks when compared to X." I'm not eagerly anticipating that moment, just that when it happens I'll be ready.

For those who don't like it, the way I see it is this: if you don't like it, don't buy it. It won't stop millions around the world from buying it, but I guess repeating you hate it, or saying those who bought it will regret it make you feel better about your decision? Is that how it works? I don't know. I think read about it on a sociology course, but, I digress...

This is one of the most sensible Microsoft posts I've read in a long while.

1 person liked this | avoidz avoidz said:

What needs a sociological course is why the masses would like to buy for something they are not allowed to own or share while the alternative is free to own and share!

Because Windows is easier to use.

2 people like this | TomSEA TomSEA, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

4 million is nothing in the grand scheme of things. Call of Duty sold 6.5 million copies in the first few days of its release.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I'm happy to report, I was not one of the 4 million that purchased Windows 8.

treetops treetops said:

Is windows 8 really faster, if so why? What does windows 8 have that windows 7 doesn't that the average consumer would want?

MarkHughes said:

I installed Windows 8 on my desktop (my Main use machine) and found it to be absolutely fine, There is a time at the start where you are a little slow/uncertain but its really very easy to get into and I'm using it very much like I did Win7 now, Don't miss the start button at all as I can still put all my stuff on the bar (same as 7) and all my old stuff still works as before (same as Win7). My only problem of note is my G13 game pad which works, but doesn't feel as responsive for reasons I haven't figured out yet.

I also installed Visual Studio ready for some coding (I'm a programmer by trade but my company won't upgrade to 8 until after a long period of testing) I'm going to have a go at coding some metro stuff (No idea what yet though) So I'm using this as an opportunity to get a little bit ahead of the rest of the company (Never hurts) This may even encourage me to finally get some kind of tablet device...

For those asking, I wouldn't use the word "Faster" to describe the interface as such, but definitely more responsive, more snappy. In fact it was quite surprising to begin with how quickly things react when moved about. Boot times are reduced and I suspect it might be more economical in terms or resource use (Not really had time to check yet though) Shut down also seems better.

Yes, there are things that still need to be sorted to iron out some creases, but overall I'm very happy with my purchase.

My advice, Get it, and set aside maybe half a day to get to grips with it, then use it and don't look back. Old software isn't like old cars.

Elitassj4 said:

Is windows 8 really faster, if so why? What does windows 8 have that windows 7 doesn't that the average consumer would want?

The difference is that windows 8 has no Start button.

Neil_The_Hero Neil_The_Hero said:

Not just selling an upgrade, to sell a new computer... How many Windows 7 updates were sold?

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

Is it just me or if you put a square mustasch on the picture of the front title page, it becomes a very scary sight....

Homicidal Manatee impersonators might need whiskers...maybe not a full mo'.

Don't be ashamed... we'll probably all switch to 8 one day sooner or later. or Windows 9, which will just be an updated version of 9.

I'll switch to Windows 10 then since that should be an updated version of 10....much better.

4 million is nothing in the grand scheme of things. Call of Duty sold 6.5 million copies in the first few days of its release.

And? Through next year Win8 will probably still be selling pretty well...CoD:MW3 probably not as much

treetops treetops said:

The min system requirements for ram and cpu are exactly the same as windows 7. It almost seems like a service pack, but also a os geared towards touch devices.

dawei1993 said:

4 million is nothing in the grand scheme of things. Call of Duty sold 6.5 million copies in the first few days of its release.

LOL I can imagine all the kids rushing to buy cod.

Guest said:

I'm happy for Microsoft and all the people who really enjoy Windows 8. I don't plan on upgrading as I find Windows 7 works quite fine and I don't have to alter how I work to conform to Microsoft's ideas. I also recently upgraded to Ubuntu 12.10 on another system and I'm quite happy with that. In fact, I suspect that Windows 7 will be my last version of Windows.

1 person liked this | Ranger1st Ranger1st said:

Win 8 = Ace of Base.. allot of copies were sold.. but very very few will admit to owning the trash..

Guest said:

MarkHughes said:

"I installed Windows 8 on my desktop (my Main use machine) and found it to be absolutely fine, There is a time at the start where you are a little slow/uncertain but its really very easy to get into and I'm using it very much like I did Win7 now, Don't miss the start button at all as I can still put all my stuff on the bar (same as 7) and all my old stuff still works as before (same as Win7). My only problem of note is my G13 game pad which works, but doesn't feel as responsive for reasons I haven't figured out yet.

I also installed Visual Studio ready for some coding (I'm a programmer by trade but my company won't upgrade to 8 until after a long period of testing) I'm going to have a go at coding some metro stuff (No idea what yet though) So I'm using this as an opportunity to get a little bit ahead of the rest of the company (Never hurts) This may even encourage me to finally get some kind of tablet device...

For those asking, I wouldn't use the word "Faster" to describe the interface as such, but definitely more responsive, more snappy. In fact it was quite surprising to begin with how quickly things react when moved about. Boot times are reduced and I suspect it might be more economical in terms or resource use (Not really had time to check yet though) Shut down also seems better.

Yes, there are things that still need to be sorted to iron out some creases, but overall I'm very happy with my purchase.

My advice, Get it, and set aside maybe half a day to get to grips with it, then use it and don't look back. Old software isn't like old cars."

Excuse me while I stop vomiting for a moment. Everytime I read someone posting the same old tired bull**** about why everyone should love Windows 8 it takes me a minute to re-compose myself.

Myth: People who didn't camp outside a Microsoft store to purchase Windows 8 don't hate it because a start button is missing. They hate it because of an flawed misconception that lies at the foundation of the entire Windows 8 UI, and that is, that you can replace a keyboard and mouse with a finger and everything will remain the same.

The other old tired regurgitated bull**** that I keep hearing is that Windows 8 is slicker, smoother, faster, (sexier anybody). Microsoft should have named Windows 8 "Smooth Pimp" the way you guys describe this operating system. Did anyone ask how they achieved this extra speed? NewsFlash. When you take out code that used to draw rounded edges, and more complex graphic functions, it works faster. They stripped out the whole Aero theme and replaced it with tiles, boxes, squares. Oh so pretty.

If all you people are worried about is faster boot times, start searching E-Bay for an old Atari 2600 or Commodore 64. I hear they boot pretty damn fast.

But I saved the best regurgitated argument for last. This ones my favorite. "Just try Windows 8. You will get 'used' to it". Or as Mr Hughes says, "you will come to grips with it". Just as a freshly incarcerated criminal finds himself adjusting to his new cell block after a period of time. Well, somebody show me the way to the Windows 8 store. I was hesitant about upgrading to it before. But since Mr. Huhges has reassured us all that we will eventually, "come to grips with it". And so many others have assured us all that if you just try Windows 8 you will eventually get 'used to it', I see no reason for me to wait any longer.

Windows 8 is a ******* disaster, period. I have not tried it. I won't try it. And I am definitely not purchasing it.

I will also be watching how many copies of Windows 8 are sold in the next year after the promotional sales end. You know, the one where they were practically giving the software away.

likedamaster said:

That's 2 million more than the Vita sold in almost a year. lulz

Guest said:

Hurray. Microsoft mad 60 millions dollars in 4 days.

Microsoft's online business unit is losing 2.5 billion every quarter.

jobeard jobeard, TS Ambassador, said:

Faster, better, more secure - - marketing hype that is always attached to everything new. humbug

Guest said:

Smoother, faster, safer... not bs:

[link]

treeski treeski said:

I have not tried it. I won't try it..

Every bit of your already silly rant was nullified by this. Windows 8 is obviously the beginning of a radical shift in how we will (choose to) interact with our PCs. But it's just that, the beginning. Obviously there are a lot of rough patches.

No one is saying you have to love it. No one is saying you have to like it. However, you have no right to complain and rant about a product that you've never even tried.

Guest said:

Treeski said:

"

Every bit of your already silly rant was nullified by this. Windows 8 is obviously the beginning of a radical shift in how we will (choose to) interact with our PCs. But it's just that, the beginning. Obviously there are a lot of rough patches.

No one is saying you have to love it. No one is saying you have to like it. However, you have no right to complain and rant about a product that you've never even tried.

"

****

1)Please point out which part of my argument was the silly part and explain what is flawed about the logic. I actually only put forth one premise in my whole argument. All the rest of my 'rant' was exposing the 'stupidity' of the premises put fourth supporting reasons to upgrade to the catastrophe that is Windows 8.

The number one reason that most people put fourth to convert last minute holdouts to upgrade to Windows 8 is truly the most absurd. "You will get used to it. You will come to grips with it. Etc, etc.".

I could argue that point about anything on planet earth and demonstrated the absurdity of putting forth such a claim as a reason to upgrade to this catastrophe.

You cannot win an argument when the premises are flawed.

You say I have no right to complain about Windows 8 because I haven't even tried it. Wrong. The premise of the operating system is flawed. You cannot replace a keyboard and a mouse with a single stubby, greasy, smelly, finger and expect things to be easier. If they are truly easier then its only in relation to the power that is slowly being stripped away from the operating system to begin with. If all you seek to do is watch YouTube videos with your smelly index finger, then I guess I could concede that Windows 8 no longer requires a keyboard and a mouse.

And from what I hear, without even having tried Windows 8, is that it should no longer be called Windows because you can only really use one at a time, full-screen at that. No reason for me to try Windows 8. I am content enough where I am. Change for change sakes alone is stupidity.

RajeGera RajeGera said:

Being a dot net technologies enthusiast I would love to work on Windows 8 and develop apps.Windows8 mobiles certainly gives tons of opportunities to develop apps and make money.

jobeard jobeard, TS Ambassador, said:

Opinions are like noses - - everyone has one. There are perfectly valid reasons to say NO without sampling it.

Recall; Parents frequently warn their children

just because the lemmings are going over the cliff doesn't mean you have to.

jobeard jobeard, TS Ambassador, said:

BTW: the GUI interface which was created by Xerox PARC, first used by Apple and then adopted by Microsoft,

all contain the WIMP interface;

  • Windows
  • Icons
  • Menus
  • Pointer device

the Pointer device today is the Mouse - - Win/8 now wants us all to use our fingers - - the jury is still out as to the results of that GUI decision.

PS: the Enterprise users are all sticking with Win/7

Guest said:

They were all windows 8 testers...hahaha

gingerbill said:

They are always going to sell millions no matter how poor it is , no surprise there. Sales have to be judged alongside windows 7 sales., and I assume they will be a lot worse.

I'm happy with 7 , I won't ever buy 8 as I use a desktop and I want an OS designed for my desktop. Hope windows 9 returns to being a desktop OS.

jobeard jobeard, TS Ambassador, said:

They were all windows 8 testers...hahaha

Longest BETA test in history :giggle:

lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Treeski said:

"

Every bit of your already silly rant was nullified by this. Windows 8 is obviously the beginning of a radical shift in how we will (choose to) interact with our PCs. But it's just that, the beginning. Obviously there are a lot of rough patches.

No one is saying you have to love it. No one is saying you have to like it. However, you have no right to complain and rant about a product that you've never even tried.

"

****

1)Please point out which part of my argument was the silly part and explain what is flawed about the logic. I actually only put forth one premise in my whole argument. All the rest of my 'rant' was exposing the 'stupidity' of the premises put fourth supporting reasons to upgrade to the catastrophe that is Windows 8.

The number one reason that most people put fourth to convert last minute holdouts to upgrade to Windows 8 is truly the most absurd. "You will get used to it. You will come to grips with it. Etc, etc.".

I could argue that point about anything on planet earth and demonstrated the absurdity of putting forth such a claim as a reason to upgrade to this catastrophe.

You cannot win an argument when the premises are flawed.

You say I have no right to complain about Windows 8 because I haven't even tried it. Wrong. The premise of the operating system is flawed. You cannot replace a keyboard and a mouse with a single stubby, greasy, smelly, finger and expect things to be easier. If they are truly easier then its only in relation to the power that is slowly being stripped away from the operating system to begin with. If all you seek to do is watch YouTube videos with your smelly index finger, then I guess I could concede that Windows 8 no longer requires a keyboard and a mouse.

And from what I hear, without even having tried Windows 8, is that it should no longer be called Windows because you can only really use one at a time, full-screen at that. No reason for me to try Windows 8. I am content enough where I am. Change for change sakes alone is stupidity.

Your argument is inherently flawed.

Where do you leave, then, those who have tried it and loved it? I mean, according to you using it must be horrible, right? The combination of desktop + touch under one OS is indeed risky, but only because it's unconventional, not necessarily because it's inferior. Some people can handle this unconventionality and adapt, others don't. And that's fine. I'll go out on a limb here and say you fall in the latter category.

The unnecessarily verbose posts of yours tell me you <I>really</I> want to convince us Windows 8 is a "catastrophe." It won't be. Don't waste your breath. You have your reasons to hate it, fine.

But there are a number of sociological, psychological, and economical factors as to why it won't be a catastrophe. One of them is the the consumer's curiosity. "What is that laptop that turns into a tablet?" Second is, most consuners factor in the price of Surface RT tablets with Office included. The same could be said about someone who already has a tablet and decides to have the same experience on the desktop. Point is, hardware options are considerably more than Vista; MS' rate of penetration with highly differentiated hardware is higher than ever, especially in high tech markets such as Japan and India. Consumers buy and learn. That's not counting the 10+ million W8 upgrades already deployed to large businesses and the enterprise. You must be saying: "That can't be, touch doesn't work on the desktop!" That might be because using Windows 8 with mouse and keyboard is just fine. Different, but not a dealbreaker.

Hell, Vista was bad in the beginning, and it still sold millions. Did it have a bad reputation? Yes. But that didn't stop MS.

MS genuinely <I>believes</I> in Metro. That should scare you, because it means that Windows will <I>never</I> be the same, for better or worse. The trick here is that, lucky for MS, millions and millions of people fall in, you know, the <I>former category.</I>

Guest said:

Lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said: "

Your argument is inherently flawed."

Where do you leave, then, those who have tried it and loved it? I mean, according to you using it must be horrible, right? The combination of desktop + touch under one OS is indeed risky, but only because it's unconventional, not necessarily because it's inferior. Some people can handle this unconventionality and adapt, others don't. And that's fine. I'll go out on a limb here and say you fall in the latter category.

The unnecessarily verbose posts of yours tell me you really want to convince us Windows 8 is a "catastrophe." It won't be. Don't waste your breath. You have your reasons to hate it, fine.

But there are a number of sociological, psychological, and economical factors as to why it won't be a catastrophe. One of them is the the consumer's curiosity. "What is that laptop that turns into a tablet?" Second is, most consuners factor in the price of Surface RT tablets with Office included. The same could be said about someone who already has a tablet and decides to have the same experience on the desktop. Point is, hardware options are considerably more than Vista; MS' rate of penetration with highly differentiated hardware is higher than ever, especially in high tech markets such as Japan and India. Consumers buy and learn. That's not counting the 10+ million W8 upgrades already deployed to large businesses and the enterprise. You must be saying: "That can't be, touch doesn't work on the desktop!" That might be because using Windows 8 with mouse and keyboard is just fine. Different, but not a dealbreaker.

Hell, Vista was bad in the beginning, and it still sold millions. Did it have a bad reputation? Yes. But that didn't stop MS.

MS genuinely believes in Metro. That should scare you, because it means that Windows will never be the same, for better or worse. The trick here is that, lucky for MS, millions and millions of people fall in, you know, the former category."

------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------

My argument is that replacing a mouse and a keyboard (which is ultimately what Microsoft wants to do - lets be honest) with the same index finger, that you pick your nose with, and expecting a person to be productive is ridiculous. Now, explain by example please, how my argument is inherently flawed?

Most of the people who have tried it and love it are people who love 'new'. The reasons I hear for loving Windows 8 are lame and unconvincing. The most monotonous reason people I hear from the lovers of 'new' is that Windows 8 boots faster. That has nothing to do with the interface. The percentage of time people spend booting their computers is about 1% compared to about 99%. All the reasons people praise Windows 8 just aren't convincing or compelling, however, I would have probably already upgraded to Windows 8 if I had no idea about the interface that was in store for me.

Just for comparison, my last message was about 5 paragraphs, which was almost the same size as your reply. My paragraphs aren't verbose just for the hell of it. They are verbose because I meticulously read every word that people write when they try and defend their reasons for believing that everybody should everybody upgrade to Windows 8 because a few nerds who can't control their insatiable addictions to having the latest and greatest software, no matter its flaws. It's the nerd power users who are vehemently defending Windows 8 the most. Why? Because they want to feel secure in the decision that they have made. If you love it so much, enjoy, knock yourself out. :)

I've made my decision. I am sitting this one out. In 3 years, when Microsoft releases Windows 9 I'll give it a serious look depending on what I am seeing and hearing through the grapevine. The world isn't going to end if I do not upgrade. Life goes on. I have patience and I have no interest in upgrading to Windows 8.

I could understand Moms and Pops, teenage girls who wants to browse facebook, and causual users liking this move. What makes me want to puke is all the nerds who are dropping their pants and bending over for anything Microsoft releases. It really is disgusting.

And the last thing I would like to say is that Gabe Newell said Microsoft's Windows 8 was a catastrophe, not me. He's a billionaire. You want me to give his words a second thought.

Guest said:

Scavengers wrote: "Once you get over the interface change and learn to set it up how you like it Windows 8 is just damn slick."

Slick? Name me 10 major improvements over Windows 7 that are not Metro related that ordinary people would care about, that makes the jump in the air, good luck!

Slick, because Metro is slick? No, Metro is new and like every new system it needs to mature, like Windows did and just like Office did, not to mention that there are hardly any applications available for Metro.

Right now there is nothing "slick" about Windows 8, it's not being a hater, it's being a realist who focuses on the facts.

Doctor John Doctor John said:

Lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said: "

Your argument is inherently flawed."

Where do you leave, then, those who have tried it and loved it? I mean, according to you using it must be horrible, right? The combination of desktop + touch under one OS is indeed risky, but only because it's unconventional, not necessarily because it's inferior. Some people can handle this unconventionality and adapt, others don't. And that's fine. I'll go out on a limb here and say you fall in the latter category.

The unnecessarily verbose posts of yours tell me you really want to convince us Windows 8 is a "catastrophe." It won't be. Don't waste your breath. You have your reasons to hate it, fine.

But there are a number of sociological, psychological, and economical factors as to why it won't be a catastrophe. One of them is the the consumer's curiosity. "What is that laptop that turns into a tablet?" Second is, most consuners factor in the price of Surface RT tablets with Office included. The same could be said about someone who already has a tablet and decides to have the same experience on the desktop. Point is, hardware options are considerably more than Vista; MS' rate of penetration with highly differentiated hardware is higher than ever, especially in high tech markets such as Japan and India. Consumers buy and learn. That's not counting the 10+ million W8 upgrades already deployed to large businesses and the enterprise. You must be saying: "That can't be, touch doesn't work on the desktop!" That might be because using Windows 8 with mouse and keyboard is just fine. Different, but not a dealbreaker.

Hell, Vista was bad in the beginning, and it still sold millions. Did it have a bad reputation? Yes. But that didn't stop MS.

MS genuinely believes in Metro. That should scare you, because it means that Windows will never be the same, for better or worse. The trick here is that, lucky for MS, millions and millions of people fall in, you know, the former category."

------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------

My argument is that replacing a mouse and a keyboard (which is ultimately what Microsoft wants to do - lets be honest) with the same index finger, that you pick your nose with, and expecting a person to be productive is ridiculous. Now, explain by example please, how my argument is inherently flawed?

Most of the people who have tried it and love it are people who love 'new'. The reasons I hear for loving Windows 8 are lame and unconvincing. The most monotonous reason people I hear from the lovers of 'new' is that Windows 8 boots faster. That has nothing to do with the interface. The percentage of time people spend booting their computers is about 1% compared to about 99%. All the reasons people praise Windows 8 just aren't convincing or compelling, however, I would have probably already upgraded to Windows 8 if I had no idea about the interface that was in store for me.

Just for comparison, my last message was about 5 paragraphs, which was almost the same size as your reply. My paragraphs aren't verbose just for the hell of it. They are verbose because I meticulously read every word that people write when they try and defend their reasons for believing that everybody should everybody upgrade to Windows 8 because a few nerds who can't control their insatiable addictions to having the latest and greatest software, no matter its flaws. It's the nerd power users who are vehemently defending Windows 8 the most. Why? Because they want to feel secure in the decision that they have made. If you love it so much, enjoy, knock yourself out.

I've made my decision. I am sitting this one out. In 3 years, when Microsoft releases Windows 9 I'll give it a serious look depending on what I am seeing and hearing through the grapevine. The world isn't going to end if I do not upgrade. Life goes on. I have patience and I have no interest in upgrading to Windows 8.

I could understand Moms and Pops, teenage girls who wants to browse facebook, and causual users liking this move. What makes me want to puke is all the nerds who are dropping their pants and bending over for anything Microsoft releases. It really is disgusting.

And the last thing I would like to say is that Gabe Newell said Microsoft's Windows 8 was a catastrophe, not me. He's a billionaire. You want me to give his words a second thought.

Yes, let's not be verbose.

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