USC helps validate the authenticity of D-Wave's quantum computer

By on June 29, 2013, 3:09 PM
qubits, usc, quantum mechanics, quantum computer, d-wave

Researchers at the University of Southern California on Friday published findings that help validate the authenticity of D-Wave’s quantum computer. Their evidence isn’t definitive proof that D-Wave has created a true quantum computer but they were able to determine that it can do work in line with quantum mechanics.

In a press release on the matter, Daniel Lidar, scientific director of the Quantum Computing Center and one of the researchers on the team, points out that his team used a specific test problem involving eight qubits. This method verified that the D-Wave processor performs optimization calculations using a procedure that is consistent with quantum annealing and is inconsistent with the predictions of classic annealing.

A transistor in a classical computer can store a single “bit” of information meaning if the transistor in “on,” it holds a 1 and if it is “off,” it holds a 0. Quantum bits inside a true quantum computer are unique in the fact that they can store information in two states at the same time. This means a qubit can store a 0 and 1 simultaneously. By adding more and more qubits, you end up with a computer that is exponentially more powerful than a traditional computer.

D-Wave claims to have built the world’s first quantum computer but naturally, there are plenty of skeptics. Even still, companies like Google and Lockheed Martin seem convinced, having purchased machines from D-Wave at a price of around $10 million.




User Comments: 15

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JC713 JC713 said:

Very interesting! It would be great to see the quantum computing revolution.

Darth Shiv Darth Shiv said:

Hmmm once they get to 128 qubits, things start to get interesting.

2 people like this | Guest said:

Does this mean I can download pron faster? Or know the next lotto numbers? Or find a girlfriend who doesn't want to 'change' me after 6 months?

I really hope it comes with a huge subwoofer that goes "QUANTUUUM" in a deep spacial Dolby voice when you turn it on at least.

1 person liked this | Guest said:

Just got off the phone with God.

He said that he has to set limits on some things, and once we perfect the Quantum computer he will have to cause the ferals to rise up and kill all the smart people to create balance in the universe.

Something about Zardoz, he said.

Derka.

cuerdc said:

I was looking for a new gaming rig hmmmmm

1 person liked this | Lurker101 said:

But can it run Crysis?

Sorry, that's kinda obligatory so I thought I'd get it out of the way.

JC713 JC713 said:

Hmmm once they get to 128 qubits, things start to get interesting.

D-Wave has already constructed one according to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-Wave_Systems. It is designed to run as a 128-qubit semiconducting adiabatic quantum optimization processor.

Qubits_Toy Qubits_Toy said:

Patterns in nature will allow optimization.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

But can it run Crysis?

Sorry, that's kinda obligatory so I thought I'd get it out of the way.

To me, thats actually a legitimate question. At this point in tech; if it doesn't run Crysis or similar applications, I'm not interested. I'm still waiting for a statement of how Quantum Computing can actually be used.

mosu said:

In my humble opinion, it's just mathematical bulls***t.Quantum theory is just an exercise, not really connected to real world.Nowadays technology evolved, be ready for some surprises...

St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

But can it run Crysis?

Sorry, that's kinda obligatory so I thought I'd get it out of the way.

To me, thats actually a legitimate question. At this point in tech; if it doesn't run Crysis or similar applications, I'm not interested. I'm still waiting for a statement of how Quantum Computing can actually be used.

Think more 'server' than 'home PC'. Those jobs that run for 6 months on server farms? Done in a day. Distributed services like folding@home, etc? All possibilities done within a couple months. Modelling, simulating, it all becomes possible in better-than-real-time.

Oh, and it presents a lovely problem for passwords. No password is safe with quantum computing.

1 person liked this | cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Think more 'server' than 'home PC'.
It's still processing regardless of how it is applied. And the way they describe Quantum Computing makes for a hard sale. The way they describe Quantum Computing, every answer except for the one needed is returned. I hardly see how that can be considered processing.

I'm still calling BS, unless they can demonstrate a much easier explanation of how it will be useful. In other words quite teasing with 0's, 1's, or whatever is between and actually show an application.

RzmmDX said:

Hmmm once they get to 128 qubits, things start to get interesting.

D-Wave has already constructed one according to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-Wave_Systems. It is designed to run as a 128-qubit semiconducting adiabatic quantum optimization processor.

I was reading that and it seems that it does not run any sort of program, just really specialized algorithms.

If only cloud computing was done with these.

JC713 JC713 said:

Imagine if quantum computing doesnt even fully exist exist and we have been wasting our time these past few decades.

Guest said:

I thought this had 512 qubits.

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