Chromebooks accounted for 21 percent of all notebook sales through November

By on December 30, 2013, 11:00 AM
google, microsoft, windows, laptop, chromebook, notebooks, chromebooks

If the planned rebellion against Microsoft Windows at next month's Consumer Electronics Show wasn’t enough to keep Redmond up at night, the latest notebook sales figures from The NPD Group will likely do the job. The consumer market research firm found Chromebooks accounted for 21 percent of all notebook sales and nearly 10 percent of all computer sales through November.

Elsewhere, tablets captured more than 22 percent of all personal computing device sales sold through the end of last month. Broken down further, Windows tablet sales nearly tripped compared to the year-ago period while Android tablet sales were up more than 160 percent. Looking at the bigger picture, however, Apple still dominated the market with their iPad accounting for 59 percent of the tablet market.

Stephen Baker, vice president of industry analysis at NPD, said the market for personal computing devices in commercial markets continues to shift and change. He noted that new products like Chromebooks and reimagined items like Windows tablets are now supplementing the revitalization that iPads started in personal computing devices.

The statistics reflect what we’ve been hearing from other outlets as well. Last week, Amazon published their holiday best sellers list where two of the top three laptops sold on the site were Chromebooks from Acer and Samsung (the third device was the ASUS Transformer Book).

For comparison, Windows notebooks accounted for 31.1 percent of all commercial preconfigured notebook sales during the same period, down from 42.9 percent a year ago.




User Comments: 17

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1 person liked this | Guest said:

Who is buying these things. I played with one, and I don't see the value.

m4a4 m4a4 said:

I personally don't take notebooks seriously. Only good for web browsing (and my phone can also do that)

Edit: Maybe I was thinking of netbooks (the 9" and smaller screened ones). However, as a heavy PC user, I don't see the point in cheaping out with a notebook...

Nobina Nobina said:

Who is buying these things. I played with one, and I don't see the value.

Probably some people with more money than sense. Still I envy them for that.

NotParker NotParker said:

This was "US Channel Sales" which is only 14 million per year. World PC sales are around 300 million.

Nobina Nobina said:

I personally don't take notebooks seriously. Only good for web browsing (and my phone can also do that)

Why? notebooks can do everything desktops can, except heavy gaming cause of smaller screen and less performance. Netbooks however are for web browsing.

9Nails, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Education is buying these things. More affordable than Mac laptop/desktops, more versatile than "iTouch", cheaper to own and support than PC's. These bridge that gap to 1-to-1 computing that schools desire. The one sticking point is finding the software titles which schools need to support Chromebooks. A golden opportunity for developers indeed. Once developers show up these will really take off.

Guest said:

Why? notebooks can do everything desktops can, except heavy gaming cause of smaller screen and less performance. Netbooks however are for web browsing.

Maybe he meant chromebooks and not notebooks in general. That would be more accurate.

NTAPRO NTAPRO said:

I personally don't take notebooks seriously. Only good for web browsing (and my phone can also do that)

I don't think that's why they became so popular in the first place lol

Vrmithrax Vrmithrax, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Who is buying these things. I played with one, and I don't see the value.

The same people who are buying Chromecasts instead of more expensive and overpowered HTPC options maybe?

It's easy to forget that a massive majority of computer users out there are NOT US. Those of us who frequent sites like this one are typically more advanced users, with higher expectations and requirements than the typical consumer. To be honest, the Chromebooks are more than adequate for the limited functionality that most users expect: browse the web, check Facebook/Twitter, do some email, maybe watch Netflix or Youtube. They don't need a full-on computer with a complete OS for most of what they do, and can often accomplish everything with just their phone. But, when they want to actually type, on a screen that is larger, why buy a more expensive overpowered option? Tablet (with keyboard) or netbook/Chromebook almost always would do the trick.

Guest said:

I wonder how many people buy these things thinking they are laptops (Windows) and are confused when they get home and fire it up.

m4a4 m4a4 said:

Why? notebooks can do everything desktops can, except heavy gaming cause of smaller screen and less performance. Netbooks however are for web browsing.

Hmmm... maybe I was thinking of netbooks (the 9" and smaller screened ones)

Trillionsin Trillionsin said:

Whoa... that's disappointing figure in the headline...a fool is easily parted with their money. Dont get me wrong I am in no way bad mouthing Google's products... n

GeforcerFX GeforcerFX said:

For a basic user they make sense but I would rather keep windows even in rt form it has more function and flexibility then the chrome os does. everyone I personally know that got one of these put ubuntu on it instead. With how cheap a windows 8 tablet runs you and a bluetooth keyboard I usually suggest that route or android/ ipad before a chromebook.

Guest17 said:

Every tune you take

Every move you make

Every hack you break

Every step you take

Google's watching you

Every single day

Every word you say

Every game you play

Every night you stay

Google's watching you

O can't you see

You belong to Googleee

How my poor Chromebook aches

With every step you take

Nobina Nobina said:

Hmmm... maybe I was thinking of netbooks (the 9" and smaller screened ones)

I don't know what were you thinking but if you though about Netbooks than I agree. They are meant for cheapest internet browsing experience and I they do that job quite badly IMO.

JC713 JC713 said:

I remember when many people in the past, me included, thought that Chromebooks were useless. But now, even though I do not own one myself, I see great potential for them in the future in schools and developing countries, or even for people who dont need a full-fledged PC.

Railman said:

For a basic user they make sense but I would rather keep windows even in rt form it has more function and flexibility then the chrome os does. everyone I personally know that got one of these put ubuntu on it instead. With how cheap a windows 8 tablet runs you and a bluetooth keyboard I usually suggest that route or android/ ipad before a chromebook.

It does appear that the best candidate for dual booting with ubuntu is the Chromebook Pixel but as that is around $1,000 it is not a cheap option. At the end of the day a touchscreen laptop preinstalled with Windows would work out cheaper.

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