German judge says Nokia should be granted injunction against all HTC devices

By on December 30, 2013, 4:00 PM
android, nokia, htc, injunction, german, patent infringement

A German judge has ruled that Nokia should be granted an injunction against all HTC handsets running Android. Judge Dr. Matthias Zigann of the Munich I Regional Court found the devices to be in violation of a broad patent related to a method for transferring resource information across Bluetooth or NFC according to a report from FOSS Patents.

HTC is in between a rock and a hard place in Germany following the ruling. In the event the company can’t come up with a chance to appeal, Nokia could then enforce the injunction which would put a stop to all sales of HTC devices running Android.

And to make matters worse, this isn’t a temporary injunction like we’ve seen so many times before. If Nokia is eventually successful, they would be able to keep the offending devices off store shelves indefinitely.

A victory here could have far reaching ramifications for other handset makers as well. That’s because the broad patent essentially describes a method used by handset makers to transfer data between devices. True, there’s still Wi-Fi as an option but near-field communication and Bluetooth are both commonly used among Android devices.

This is the second favorable ruling for Nokia against HTC this month. Previously, Nokia won a case that would have required HTC to remove devices from store shelves but HTC made a change that circumvented the infringement. It’ll be interesting to see whether or not HTC can make similar changes this time around to once again thwart Nokia’s injunction.




User Comments: 3

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2 people like this | yRaz yRaz said:

As someone who owns a Nokia Lumia, I certainly hope they don't decide to go the apple route with patents. Broad patents are the bane of the tech world. Sure, if it was something specific that HTC decided to use I'd be okay with it. But to me this seems closer to apple trying to patent a rectangle with a touch screen.

Mbloof said:

It should go without saying: if it has been done before or someone else is doing it you'd better check if there's a patent on what they are doing before blindly plowing ahead and playing copy-cat.

Putting aside that many patents ought never of been granted in the first place (a whole different subject) if a companies "IP" is being infringed on they have a right and obligation to protect it.

Guest said:

Or, you could simply pay a license fee to use such technology. Like Apple and others pay Nokia to use some of it's intellectual properties.Gi ve

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