TechSpot

Antec P180 PSU

By Starsky303
Jun 19, 2008
  1. Hi all,

    Does anyone know of a PSU which will power the latest GPUs (Geforce GTX 280 - 6-pin and 8-pin connectors available) which would fit in my Antex P180 case?

    Dimension: Standard ATX PS2 150 x 140 x 86 mm

    Please help!!!

    Cheers!
     
  2. Rage_3K_Moiz

    Rage_3K_Moiz Sith Lord Posts: 7,290   +25

    Any ATX PSU delivering at least 550W and 40A on the +12V rail(s) will run the GTX 280 and any other card just fine. I'd recommend the Corsair 650TX.
     
  3. mailpup

    mailpup TS Special Forces Posts: 8,484   +233

    The Silverstone Olympia model line has 6 pin PCI-E connectors as well as 8 pin PCI-E connectors. The higher wattage models will have two 8 pin connectors for two graphics cards.
     
  4. Starsky303

    Starsky303 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 70

    OCZ

    Found an OCZ power supply with the right dimensions for my case, connectors:
    15 pin Serial ATA power
    4 PIN internal power
    4 PIN mini-power connector
    6 pin PCI Express power
    Power 24 pin ATX with detachable
    4 pin section Power
    4 pin ATX12V connector
    Power 8 pin +12V

    Will this PSU be ok?
     
  5. Starsky303

    Starsky303 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 70

    Oh, hang on, I doubt it...
     
  6. Starsky303

    Starsky303 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 70

    This any better? (I doubt it...):
    4 pin Molex to 6 pin PCI-Express Adapter x1
    4 pin Molex to 8 (4+4) pin + 12V Power Adapter
     
  7. Rage_3K_Moiz

    Rage_3K_Moiz Sith Lord Posts: 7,290   +25

    Understand that the PSU should deliver enough power on the +12V rail(s). That is your first and foremost concern. Then look at the connectors. You didn't tell us which OCZ supply it is, so we can't help you without knowing what series it comes from and its rated wattage.
     
  8. Starsky303

    Starsky303 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 70

    Yeah that would help!
    OCZ Technology 700W Active PFC GameXStream

    Basically, when the specs read that there's a 6 pin PCI-E connector, shouldn't they say that the 8 (4+4) pin connector is also PCI-E?
     
  9. mailpup

    mailpup TS Special Forces Posts: 8,484   +233

    Yes, they should so it isn't. The 4+4 is for something else, namely for motherboards, not graphics cards. Some use just the 4 +12V and others use the 8 (or 4+4) 12V. The PCI-E would be either 6, 8 or 6+2 but not 4+4.

    You can still use an adapter but if you want a power supply that already comes with a 6 pin PCI-E and an 8 pin PCI-E, keep looking.

    Edit: Click here - Newegg for an example of a PSU that has both 6 pin PCI-E and 8 pin PCI-E connectors. Notice that it also has an different type of 8 pin connector, the EPS 12V. That's the one that the OCZ had but it is not the same as 8 pin PCI-E.
     
  10. Starsky303

    Starsky303 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 70

    Thanks for your help.

    There are plenty of 6/8pin PSUs out there but none that fit my dimensions exactly (stupid Antec case). Will have to go 1cm over. Sounds little but it means there's less room for cables and the vent for the PSU isn't being used properly!

    Thanks again all!
     
  11. Rage_3K_Moiz

    Rage_3K_Moiz Sith Lord Posts: 7,290   +25

    I recommend this PSU for you. It has 52A on a single +12V rail, plus two 6+2 pin power connectors. It should fit in your case easily and should be enough for the GTX 280.
    Good luck and let us know how it goes. :)
    EDIT: I did mean to link to the 650 TX but I guess I pasted the wrong link instead. Regardless, it's fixed now.
     
     
  12. Starsky303

    Starsky303 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 70

  13. pdyckman@comcas

    pdyckman@comcas TS Rookie Posts: 718

    Go to a well supplied electronics superstore like Fry's Electronics. Have a photo of the connection that you are seeking. (I didn't know they had changed). Usually it's a 4 pin connector. In any case, try to buy a supply that exceeds your needs by at least 10 if not 20 %. You won't be sorry that you spent the extra $ when you start adding more upgrades to your machine. Good Luck!
     
  14. Starsky303

    Starsky303 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 70

    Hi all again!

    Ok. I've whittled it down to 3 PSUs which cater for my needs in terms of connectors, power and dimensions:
    - Seasonic M12 700
    - Enermax Modu82+ 625W
    and of course
    - Corsair TX 650W

    Which one should I buy!!!
    I know the Corsair model is the cheapest but the others are modular. Then again the Corsair wattage is higher than the Enermax, but then Enermax are renouned for their power supplies as well as Seasonic, which has the highest wattage.

    Does all this matter? They'll all power my rig won't they (see replaced item in bold)?
    Please help!

    Asus P5KC Mobo
    Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 G0 Stepping (OC'd to 3.2GHz)
    Corsair 4GB DDR2 1066MHz/PC2-8500 XMS2 Dominator Memory
    GeForce 8800GTX [replaced with GeForce GTX 280
    300GB Maxtor HD
    SB Audigy Z2
    CoolerMaster 650W PSU (no flaming 8-pin connector though!)
    Antex P180b Case
     
  15. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    All of those will work fine, although I would prefer not to use the Enermax. Consider also FSP Group which are phenomenal at an often lower price.
     
  16. Starsky303

    Starsky303 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 70

    I did wonder...
    There's a FSP Everest 700W Model which I'm also considering but I can't find a UK vendor.
    So based on the fact that they all work well, do you think I should simply buy the Corsair model?

    Also, what's wrong with the Enermax model?
     
  17. Rage_3K_Moiz

    Rage_3K_Moiz Sith Lord Posts: 7,290   +25

    The Seasonic and Corsair PSUs would be my choice, in that order. Enermax seems to be too expensive for no reason compared to the others. I haven't checked the links, so I don't know the prices, but it's what I've generally seen.
     
  18. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    Nothing wrong with it, but it doesn't work as well in a gaming machine as the Corsair... there are a few more combacks with Enermax, and a LOT more with the Antec... besides, the price is right for the Corsair... at least in the US until June 31 ends.
     
  19. CMH

    CMH TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,573   +9

    Just a note:

    The dimensions for ATX power supplies are specifically set, and thus any ATX case should be able to fit ATX power supplies.

    There could be problems with small cases (LAN boxes for example) or cases with a weird setup (Antec 900 comes to mind), but as far as I know, the P180 should fit all ATX power supplies out there.
     
  20. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    The problem with that idea is that the ATX case became a fluid ID in 2004 when the specs began to change. Not since then have there been many true ATX power supplies, and the ATX case has long been a variation. Only when the case is advertised as ATX can you be fairly certain of what you have.
    Measure any high quality power supply in mm of height, length and width, and you will hardly find common ground. We are now up to V2.03 from the original ATX specs. Size is the least of the changes, where voltages and amperages and rails have shown significant changes every June. In fact, It has been a long time since I have seen a true ATX power supply, and few people would want one.
     
  21. captaincranky

    captaincranky TechSpot Addict Posts: 10,977   +957

    I think the only ATX PSU specs that aren't "fluid" are the mounting bolt pattern and line cord interlock. Other than that, more wattage generally leads to deeper (longer?) PSUs (.) or (?) Your choice.
     
  22. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    There just doesn't seem to be an adequate line for steady Amperage output under load. And that is the one that would count.
    Crummy power supplies can have high ratings, and I guess that is how they wanted it.
     
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.