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Apple reportedly ordered 12 petabytes of video storage for iTunes cloud

By Emil
Apr 6, 2011
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  1. Apple has ordered as much as 12 petabytes worth of data storage from EMC unit Isilon Systems, according to an inside source cited by StorageNewsletter. The order supposedly coincides with the upcoming release of a new product that Isilon is expected to announce next week.

    Read the whole story
  2. Wagan8r

    Wagan8r TechSpot Guru Posts: 590   +45

    When will people learn that bytes are not decimal based? 1 petabyte is 1,024 terabytes, or 1,048,576 gigabytes. And a DVD is 4.37 GB so, 12 PB is the equivalent of 239,554 DVDs rounded up.
  3. Raswan

    Raswan TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 280

    Because it too hard? People are lazy? In the end, it doesn't really make a difference? Take your pick.
  4. Leeky

    Leeky TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    Of course it makes a difference. One way is correct, the other is incorrect.
  5. lawfer

    lawfer TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,272   +90

    I agree, but its passable mistake. I think the article's point came across; let's not dwell too munch into the semantics...
  6. Leeky

    Leeky TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    Oh definitely, my comment was in response to the poster in questions point mainly, otherwise I wouldn't have really said anything.

    Its a common mistake, but but a mistake none-the-less.
  7. mario

    mario Ex-TS Developer Posts: 399   +17

    Actually now the SI (International System of Units) says a megabyte is 10^6 bytes. And a mebibyte is 2^20 bytes. This is why HDD and other storage manufacturers seem to advertise higher capacities than what they are reported on most OSs since most systems use the original way of counting the capacities by multiples of 2.

    Apple since SL uses the SI table for reporting capacities, don't know if any other system does this. But I think this is the best solution since everyone advertises their specifications using multiples of 10.

    So yeah this article is factually right and wagan8r is theoretically wrong (see chart at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megabyte) although I was taught in school the binary way, it seems some time the SI decided to standardize it and rounded them.
  8. lawfer

    lawfer TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,272   +90

    How can he be theoretically wrong, if he's not factually right? In other words, he's factually wrong.

    As to the veracity of your argument, I can't check because I'm at work... ;)
  9. mario

    mario Ex-TS Developer Posts: 399   +17

    @lawfer yes I know, I just wasn't trying to sound mean nor pedantic :S. And in theory if something is theoretically wrong it should also be factually wrong ;) so that's why I ended up using that sentence.
  10. Archean

    Archean TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,041   +72

    mario (and Emil) is 'factually' right lawfer, for whatever stupid reasons (read getting some extra bucks I guess) the HDD manufacturer started doing this few years ago. So, it is rather a case of 'reality' is being bit different than the theory.

    By the way, Quantum Mechanics does tell us that 'reality can be different i) when we observe it, and ii) when we do not observe it. So as long as HDD manufacturer's wasn't so 'observant' they continued to use the 'right way' of calculating an MB, but then some smartass in the industry thought (or rather observed it) about this and changes were made. ;)
  11. intelinside

    intelinside Newcomer, in training

    interesting.... btw, who's selling the contents to Apple?
     
  12. mario

    mario Ex-TS Developer Posts: 399   +17

    @intelinside it's not just media content, now with the App Stores (iOS and Mac) a lot of developers distribute their software and games (including very large ones) through it. So Apple needs a LOT of storage for music, standard and HD video, software and games.

    And of course there's also MobileMe and related cloud services.
  13. Wagan8r

    Wagan8r TechSpot Guru Posts: 590   +45

    Wow, I didn't know that they even created such a unit as a mebibyte. I guess I'll have to swallow my pride and say that the article is factually right. Now, I officially hate the SI. Using decimal based numbers to describe memory amounts is flat out retarded. No computer works in such a manner. I understand that they want "consistency" in their beloved prefixes, but if that's the case, they should completely do-away with even using kilobyte, megabyte, etc. and ONLY use the kibi, mebi, ect. prefixes.
  14. 12 petabytes... so around 12 million gigabytes? There are hundreds of millions of iDevices sold. Each person would get less than 100mb of storage!
  15. The post regarding 100MB of storage per user is assuming that each unique song/video would be stored for each individual user. Certainly for commercially available titles those would be likely stored only once and pointers would be used from each persons library.
  16. "..for commercially available titles those would be likely stored only once and pointers would be used from each persons library."

    yep.

    Also, one account could have multiple devises associated with it, seeing how one person could own an iPhone, iPad, and so on, that they would sync with their one account.
  17. mario

    mario Ex-TS Developer Posts: 399   +17

    And of course this is not the only storage facility Apple has. That math by first Guest is assuming Apple has only 12 petabytes of storage and they have been storing all their data in air this whole time.
  18. i dnt know abt this cloud thing ... if they start something like netflix then its gonna work otherwise its same thing as streaming .. i mean u can stream songs on devices anyways.....
  19. The article writer was taking into account the formatted drive in regards to sizes ;)


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