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building a small data server

By mrbox
Jul 1, 2004
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  1. dmill89

    dmill89 TechSpot Guru Posts: 737

    It is possible to have more than 10 users on an older pre-xenon machine it is just relly slow.compared to modern server processers specifically desinged for a large number of users.

    Here's the minimum recomended sepcs per users.

    1-3 users Pentium 166 or higher (thats the least powerfull processer that can eficently run most modern versions of linux).128 mb ram, atleast 80GB HDD, nic card.
    4-6 users Pentium 2 300 mhz, 256 mb ram atleast 140 GB HDD, nic card.
    7-10 users Pentium 3 500mhz, 512 mb ram atleast 200 GB HDD,nic card.
    10-20 users Single Xenon or Optatron,1GB ram,atleast 400GB HDD,nic card.
    20+ users Dual Xenon or Optatron, 4GB ram,atleast 1 TB HDD,nic card.
  2. Nodsu

    Nodsu Newcomer, in training Posts: 9,431

    Hem. For what kind of users? Or are you saying your numbers are valid for any kind of server?

    And I hope you didn't get those numbers from a company that sells something.

    And are you saying that all servers from 90s having over 10 users were dead slow? Oh my. One starts to wonder how the internet managed to struggle through that..

    Take a simple file server. One Samba process instance consumes 4MB of RAM. How does that sum up to 128MB for three users? One can serve 10 users for sure giving plenty of RAM to the OS and system cache with 128MB. That is assuming all 10 users are actually transferring data at once.
  3. dmill89

    dmill89 TechSpot Guru Posts: 737

    Those numbers come from persional experence with file servers as well as experence of IT's I know.Back in the 90's dial up and slow nic cards were the main bottle neck so server speed was not as important but by today's standards it would be extremly slow.
    The ram requirements are mainly to run the OS and system processes.
    AS well as to help with large file transfer.
  4. Nodsu

    Nodsu Newcomer, in training Posts: 9,431

    Do you actually have experience with all these server classes you proposed? Or do you like to run your servers with every single OS feature installed and turned on?

    Are you saying that if I was to serve files to more than 50 users, I need a quad-CPU server with 8GB of RAM or a cluster perhaps?

    We run a file server here for 250 users. With "mere" 512MB of RAM and a 1.2GHz CPU. The machine is also a mail gateway and does virus/spam scanning. The bottleneck is still the 100Mbit ethernet and the fact that it takes the clients 10 seconds to open a document locally.
  5. dmill89

    dmill89 TechSpot Guru Posts: 737

    It depends on what type of files you transfer and the speed of your network. In the case of my server files are usually 200mb the system runs red hat and I have a 10/100/1000mbps nic card in all my computers. In the case of my home network 4 but i have done some work at my local HS they have 6 mainframe (big IBM Boxes with 10 CPUs each and 160GB ram) and 8 web servers for 600-1000 users. Home networks and large enterprise scale networks are my main experience in either case the users expect high speed shairing of large files.I relize that depending on your application the specs may verry.
  6. Nodsu

    Nodsu Newcomer, in training Posts: 9,431

    Thank you. So you finally almost admit that the server specs actually depend on what kind of service you are providing and what is the user profile.
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