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Changing internet connection

By SenateKT
Nov 16, 2007
  1. Currently I have a shared T1 line which plugs directly into a hardware firewall (sonic wall), and then into my switch. I'm going to be switching to a business DSL line. The line was installed and I will be hooking it up myself. I was given a Netopia DSL modem which is more like a router because because it has wireless and four ports. Ive never directly worked with a switch and was wondering what steps I will need to take to change connections. Do I just plug in the modem and swap the T1 line going to the firewall with the the DSL line? will I have to manually change any settings?

    Edit: After a little more research I found out the Netopia 3347-02 has a built in firewall so I will no longer need the sonicwall firewall correct? So can I just remove the sonic wall and plug directly into my switch?
     
  2. AlbertLionheart

    AlbertLionheart TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,026

    Your new modem looks as if it is a router as well so it will take the place of a small switch as well - you need to add any username and password to the settings and enable the firewall. Don't forget to disable the firewall on the network connection on the PC - too many firewalls spoil the broth.
     
  3. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    it isn't a small switch, it is a Dell power connect 5212 linking 10 computers. Can the Netopia modem/router plug into my switch? I assume I would just plug into the same port the current shared T1 is connected. what settings will I have to adjust?
     
  4. AlbertLionheart

    AlbertLionheart TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,026

    Yup = it should plug straight in. You may have to set it up outside the network initially, tho'
     
  5. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    what do you mean by that?
     
  6. AlbertLionheart

    AlbertLionheart TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,026

    Your new modem will need the same username and password as the old one, if any. If you have to set these up it is often easier to do this by a direct connection to the router from 1 PC instead of through a switch.
     
  7. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    there was no old modem with user name or password, we shared a T1 line with other offices in the building and it was just an ethernet cable that came and plugged directly into our sonic wall and then into our switch.
     
  8. AlbertLionheart

    AlbertLionheart TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,026

    And the new DSL line? No access restrictions on this?
     
  9. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    what do you mean by access restrictions. Our hardware firewall is basically a router, so the T1 plugs into the firewall and is user named and passworded and then from there it goes to the switch and out to the computers from there. So I was going to remove the hardware firewall completely and plug the DSL router into the switch. So it will go DSL line, into DSL router, into the switch, out to the computers.
     
  10. AlbertLionheart

    AlbertLionheart TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,026

    access restrictions = username and password. Sorry for not being clear on this.
     
  11. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    our current setup is a shared T1 ethernet cable that comes into the office, plugs into the hardware firewall (the firewall has a user name and password) and then into the switch. The switch then feeds to our file server and exchange mail server in our server room, we also have about 7 other computers in rooms throughout the office all running on a domain sharing off the file server.


    The plan is to replace the T1 connection with a business DSL connection. They installed the DSL line already and it is unplugged sitting next to the switch which is currently connected to the T1. I have the DSL modem along with a piece of paper containing the IP, Gateway, subnetmask, domain, primary DNS, secondary DNS as well as the routers IP, subnet mask, user name and password. Before I just go unplugging and changing settings I'm trying to research so I don't run into any problems. Do I need to change anything on the server or will the DSL connection automatically be recognized by just plugging it in?
     
  12. AlbertLionheart

    AlbertLionheart TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,026

    no access control = no worries!
     
  13. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    edited my last post to be more descriptive.
     
  14. AlbertLionheart

    AlbertLionheart TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,026

    sorry - you have lost me on this! Now there is a server and you DO have to set up the router with username and password etc etc.
    I suggest you do it and see what happens - you can always reconnect the old modem if you have to!
     
  15. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 9,348   +622

    make life easy; use the existing Sonic Wall (which I assume you understand and have already configured) and disable the DSL FW.

    prior posts are suggesting you get and keep security on the new DSL device by
    setting a new password.

    your wiring would then be;
    Code:
    DSL modem ----Sonic Wall FW ---- your existing systems
     
  16. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    one last question, will power cycling or anything be required when I am wiring it? can I just plug into the sonic wall and switch with them powered up and running or do I need to unplug them wire it and then power up?
     
  17. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 9,348   +622

    if the sonic was configured properly,
    1. power off everything
    2. wire-up the whole network
    3. power-up the DSL modem (wait 1 minute)
    4. power-up the sonic wall (wait 1 minute)
    5. now power-up your first system
    if your browser can connect to your home page, then you're good to go! :)
     
  18. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    thank you so much, after the sonic wall I power up the switch then?
     
  19. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 9,348   +622

    a switch has NO configuration so it doesn't matter (usually).

    if you want to ensure one pass at the sequence, do them ALL from the
    modem, in sequence, to any system.
     
  20. SenateKT

    SenateKT TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 46

    I failed to get internet to work throughout our network and Im going to try again tonight. I will be configuring a static IP.

    The topology goes

    Netopia modem/Router---> Sonicwall firewall---> dell power connect 5212 switch---> windows 2003 file server---> exchange mail server ---> 10 office computers.

    I was provided with the following information

    Router information
    IP: 192.168.1.xxx
    Subnet Mask:
    User name:
    Password:

    IP Address information
    IP address: 99.130.XXX.XXX - 99.130.XXX.XXX
    Gateway: 99.130.xxx.xxx
    Subnetmask:
    Domain:
    Primary DNS:
    Secondary DNS:


    What configuration changes will need to be made to the sonicwall?
    What internet protocol (TCP/IP) properties configurations will need to be made on both the server and other computers?

    Sorry I know I am not good at explaining what im trying to do but as my first time doing this setup im trying to be as prepared as possible.
     
  21. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 9,348   +622

    your network should not be serial, but multi-dropped from the switch:
    Code:
    Netopia modem/Router---> Sonicwall 
                               + --> dell power connect 5212 switch
                                             +
                                             + -- file server(A)
                                             + -- exchange server(B)
                                             +
                                             + --- 10 office systems
    
    your (A)-(B) servers should have static ip addresses and be named systems in the DOMAIN Controller

    Your Domain Controller should supply DHCP service for all Client systems.

    The Netopia Modem can serve limited router function as you only need the NAT feature from it.

    The Sonicwall appliance will be your primary firewall. With DHCP from your DOMAIN controller, the Sonicwall should disable ports 67,68.

    For full control of the 10 client systems, consider adding a PROXY for http and FTP to restrict OUTBOUND connections and avoid loss of company information. If you implement this, then ports 20,21,80,443 should ONLY be
    allowed from the machine hosting the proxy.
     
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