How to setup a computer as a router?

By LeChuck
Aug 26, 2005
  1. Hello :wave:

    I have the following configuration:
    - my new pc (let's call it NEW):
    1 LAN card (onboard)

    - my older pc (let's call it OLD):
    1 LAN card for internet access
    1 LAN card to connect with my new pc

    So OLD will become a router (or is it a proxy server?) for NEW. I've never done this before and I would really wanna know what to do:
    - OLD has installed Windows 98, but I don't think this OS can handle this situation; I've heard something about Linux and Windows Server 2003, but I'm not sure (I have no ideea about working in Linux so forget it...). So if Win98 can't do it, what should I use?
    - do I require science fiction stuff like port fowarding and stuff?
    - what exactly should I do so I can get internet on NEW?
    - can NEW and OLD act in this case as a normal network (for example, to play a LAN game)?
    - can I use 2 workgroups (one for the big network that provides me internet and one for the link between NEW and OLD)?

    I've learned a few things about networks on this forum but this is still complex for me, can you give a hand :confused: ?
  2. Nodsu

    Nodsu TS Rookie Posts: 5,837   +6

    A very easy to use Linux router package is the Coyote floppy Linux. It runs off a single floppy and does everything you need. This of course means that you won't be able to use OLD for nothing else.

    If you want to make some other use of OLD besides routing then you need to put on Windows (2000 and onwards) or a full-blown Linux/BSD distro. I think Windows ICS would be easier to set up for you.

    Whether you have to forward ports depends on what you are going to do with NEW.

    All you have to do is to configure OLD properly and set NEW to auto-detect everything

    Yes, OLD and NEW can play network games if OLD is capable of it - not many games for Linux :p

  3. RealBlackStuff

    RealBlackStuff TS Rookie Posts: 6,503

    Even easier would be to get a router with built-in 4-port switch.
    Both PCs can then access the web independently, and when both are ON, they can communicate with each other on the (home-)network via that router.
    Only 1 network card per PC needed.
  4. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 9,143   +597

    RealBlackStuff's suggestion is the short path to completing this task.
    If you want to learn networking, then taking ANY other path will teach you
    neat and interesting things. You get to decide how to use your time :giddy:
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