Independent game developers: Piracy isn't a significant threat

By Justin
Nov 12, 2009
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. With game development budgets in the tens of millions, and a relatively short shelf life on many modern games, it's no wonder that developers and publishers are always looking to curb piracy. Every year, new methods are developed to prevent games from being duplicated or outright stolen via download.

    Read the whole story
  2. TomSEA

    TomSEA TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,228   +314

    I think your headline is quite misleading. First of all, the Independent Games Developers Association is a group of small flash-based type game developers. They aren't the big boys like Bethesda, Bioware, EA, etc. who's games are stolen in the millions of units.

    Secondly, you state in the article that 90% "indicated that piracy is increasing and becoming more of problem." How does that equate to your headline of "piracy isn't a significant threat?"

    In a nutshell, you took only one of the voting criteria and placed it as a header implying that developers don't care about piracy.
  3. Puiu

    Puiu TechSpot Booster Posts: 990   +82

    "Most game developers are uninterested in allowing existing infrastructure, such as legal systems, deal with the issue, and are more intent on finding their own solution to piracy. "

    If the legal systems could do something about it they would have done it a long time ago. It's just impossible to stop piracy. The only thing they can do is go after the big fish (remember piratebay?). and what happened when piratebay was shut down? Hundreds of copy sites appeared on the internet.
    Also, the reason why they don't care so much anymore is because most of them moved to consoles. PC's are all about piracy ^_^ .
  4. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,019   +83 Staff Member

    @TomSEA: From our article: "Only 10 percent of those surveyed said piracy was a "significant" threat, which we can interpret to be hurting their cash flow."

    The headline is alluding to that -- and it's spot on. "Becoming a problem" does not equal "significant threat" -- and 90% of the developers polled agreed that it was not, at least currently, a huge problem.

    :) I took more than one look at the voting criteria when I created that title, and if I cited several chunks the headline would be a paragraph long.
  5. Vrmithrax

    Vrmithrax TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,259   +216

    TomSEA is right. TIGA is a small European association that consists of mostly individuals or very small game development groups. To begin the story with a statement about how game development budgets are now in the tens of millions of dollars, then talk only about very small fry developers who probably spend tens of hundreds of dollars on their development, that's beyond skewed and misleading journalism. Many of these guys are hobbyists, at best, and don't have their very livelihood depending on sales of their developed products, so do you really think they'll be keeping a close eye on piracy trends? Add to this the fact that they seem to be mostly developing mobile apps and flash types of games, which typically don't even warrant a pirate's consideration, and this article becomes absolutely laughable.

    Go talk to the big guys who actually live or die by their sales and profit margins, then give us a real article with relevant facts that actually cover the true industry.
  6. TomSEA

    TomSEA TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,228   +314

    Yeah Matthew, but you took the most sensationalist - and smallest percentage figure (10%) - to use as the headline as opposed to the 90% who believe that piracy is increasing and is a problem. I think that would have been the more appropriate headline.

    Just my 2 bits... ;)
  7. Vrmithrax

    Vrmithrax TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,259   +216

    Better yet, just put the word "Independent" at the beginning of the title, and THEN it is "spot on"
  8. Matthew

    Matthew TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,019   +83 Staff Member

    @TomSEA: I took the most relevant figure, which is not the smallest (the opposite of 10% who think piracy is a significant issue, is 90% who don't). Better yet the article headline could have noted the 60% who rank piracy as a "low" threat, or the 20% who say it's a "medium" threat. Perhaps even the 50% who are considering doing business differently because of piracy. Point is, there were a lot of numbers, and I chose the most noteworthy.

    That said, there might indeed have been a misunderstanding about the scope of TIGA. The headline has been tweaked to more accurately depict TIGA's reach.
  9. Kibaruk

    Kibaruk TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,119   +51

    Indeed, you should learn how to read.

    "Becoming more of a problem" means to be something that even though they know it's there they don't worry much about it.

    Like... when your tummy aches, you do feel bad, but not enough to go to the doctor.
  10. Vrmithrax

    Vrmithrax TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,259   +216

    Good fix. It's nice to see that the writers pay attention to comments and feedback here! :)
  11. Darkshadoe

    Darkshadoe TechSpot Maniac Posts: 451   +62

  12. TomSEA

    TomSEA TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,228   +314

    Uh...I never implied that and did you see the original header?
  13. Julio Franco

    Julio Franco TechSpot Editor Posts: 6,443   +268

    Thank you everyone for your feedback, certainly it helps us improve and correct any mishap during coverage. That said, personal flaming will not be tolerated between members, even worse against one of our editors - please be very careful about your comments in that regard.
     
  14. Richy2k9

    Richy2k9 TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 515

    hello ...

    piracy is a big issue, in my country PC & Xbox360 games are sold on the street ...
    still i don't accept that some would say that PC is all about piracy, even if i would agree with PC is mostly about piracy ;)

    yes the fact that most gamers are now turning to consoles & MP games would make piracy less than before, taking the consideration that the PS3 is a crack-virgin & the Xbox360 now are banned on Xbox live if modded (saw an article on techspot ha!) ... well i hope similar actions are taken against other cracked consoles even if i think it's too hard as punishment.

    why there is piracy? the authorities can't do anything because either the law is dated & have no mention about digital media & current technology. they rely on texts about copyright infringement & would take actions only if the required party request for it. taking the example from my country, MS Software piracy has drop consequently since MS came to the country, same for local artists & Indian movies where some companies now have the rights on them ... but as for occidental & european items, games & other software - still can be found selling for peanuts on DVD-Rs ...

    it's not the price that push people to buy pirated stuffs, but the availability. in fact the PS3 software market is still good in my part of the world as for other consoles.

    i don't feel like blocking internet access would help, maybe regulations on specific protocol usage, but mostly a good campaign with some actions taken to those who sell such items. it will even be better if the government would setup a special copyright tax in some small countries & use the money to pay for nation open licences so that the developers have at least something in return.

    how much money will be spend by the developers to try protect their hard work!

    another, maybe better solution would be the adoption of a global zone, some would prefer download a game that is not sold in his country mostly because have no support or direct sale of such think .. all is about availability.

    i'm a PS3 & PC Owner, i play original games on both, well the 1st one have no choice, but it is hard for me because i don't get the same content & support as for the existing zone on PSN. I can buy games from any zone, but have difficulties having addons & services & MP is another battle, if someone in my part of the world would have a modded console, won't make any difference to the one having an untouched one - so it also depend on manufacturers, give us all what we want & what we need!

    the game developers should care about it, but mostly hardware manufacturers should have better consideration & make hardware difficult to hack. i say thank you SONY for the PS3, being still untouched & for the possibility to counter any hack by forced firmware update. now even if a bit late, thank you MS for taking actions with live users having modded consoles, yet if they want to play single player games only - this is not the best solution.

    cheers!
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.