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Likely a motherboard issue?

By ikesmasher
Nov 18, 2012
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  1. The build consists of a core 2 quad running at 2.6ish (is it a Q9400 or something like that, I think)
    has 4 GB DDr2
    9800GT
    and some intel branded motherboard

    Until the new build (im getting this from a bro) what happened was it stopped detecting half the ram and started running mindboggingly slow. Nothing as slow as hard drive issues would cause, I mean, it would take minutes to open a web browser and games he used to be able to play fine (like GTA IV) would barely run then crash later on (saying your pc isnt good enough to run this game or something like that). So its nothing a hard drive would (or should) do. The mothervboard seems a likely choice for RAM problems, but would it cause the speeds? his CPU was running very hot at some points before this happened(70ish? idk.) but it still worked fine. So thats my question, is it a definite motherboard problem or is it a possible CPU problem or something? (I would be buying a new drive since he took the old one out, and a new motherboard if that was the problem...and maybe a better heatsink)

    If the CPU is the problem, ill probably just part the whole thing out and use the money towards a new build
     
  2. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,426   +317

    What version of windows and is it 32 v 64bit?

    64bit systems with only 2gb active ram would be a poor performer. however, don't judge the system using the Internet - - there are many more reasons for poor network performance.

    Process of elimination to test memory:
    Keep stick in slot 1 and remove stick in slot 2; reboot - if it runs, stick 1 is good, else

    Pull stick 1, insert stick 2 into slot 1 and reboot - - if it runs stick 2 is good, else trash and replace w/new

    If #2 is good & #1 is bad, replace
     
  3. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    Ram has been tested in another PC and is working fine.
    idk if he has 32 bit or 64 bit.
    I wasent using the internet to judge,I was referring to the time it actually took to open the browser
    Point being the PC is running stupidly slow for its specs. I know the ram is working properly, and the graphics card is. Leaving pretty much the CPU or the motherboard (he is using the old hard drive in a new build just fine so its not that)
    Thanks for any more help you can suggest
     
  4. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,426   +317

    hmm; actually that depends upon getting the program showing as a task in the taskbar or looking for the homepage to be displayed.

    try this; get a command prompt and enter nslookup 8.8.8.8. Then use tracert to the NAME shown

    ===> to see browser launch time only change the homepage to about:blank <====
     
  5. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    It was more or less an example, all programs take a long while to load.
     
  6. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    OK I have the PC and its definately a mobo issue. Its the second (2 ram slots) ram slot (furthest away from CPU). the RAM is good and the CPU is definately running full speed.Installed a temporary 40GB IDE drive and its fine too.

    Anyway, I have a new LGA775 board picked out, and my question is do I need to get some new thermal paste as well? swapping the CPU/heatsink into a new mobo will probably be the hardest thing ive ever done in building (ive only built one PC before and added/taken some parts out of others). Will the CPU be STUCK to the heatsink (stock q9400 heatsink) is my biggest question? will I have to get some thermal paste remover or something? Or just scrape off the old stuff and apply new? or is that even necessary? help is appreciated!
     
  7. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    Yes since you have to take the heatsink off to get the CPU out of the socket, you should apply new thermal paste. Its probably not truely neccessary, in a pinch you can get away with it, but it would be wiser to apply new thermal paste if your going to be using the machine a bit and putting it under load.

    Nail polish remover or rubbing alcohol removes thermal paste /w a q-tip or cotton swab very well.
     
  8. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    Ok thanks!
     
  9. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    I should add in my opinion it depends on whether or not the paste has enough left on the HS/CPU and is spread well + no dry spots, plus most importantly hasnt gone crusty. If its still smooth and not crust like then ya fine to use it, you just dont want high temps to come about from not enough being on there or it being an old crusty application is all.
     
    ikesmasher likes this.
  10. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

  11. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    Way to check is you see what Socket the motherboard has, then what socket the CPU takes. There are different pin counts per socket/cpu. The website says the mobo is:

    That means its made by Intel, model DG41CN, Socket 775, and its a MicroATX motherboard which is smaller than a regular ATX mobo. Thats why theres only 4 PCI slots of various sorts. A ATX mobo is longer and has room for more slots.

    So next step is see what a Q9400 takes for a socket. A google on q9400 socket brings me to Newegg page, I click details, and its a socket LGA 775. So yes it will work. A quick verify to make sure the mobo supports the CPU's FSB speed (Front Side Bus, thats mobo communications with the CPU), the CPU is 1333MHz FSB and the mobo supports Supports 1333/1066/800 MHz FSB speed. So your in luck!
     
    ikesmasher likes this.
     
  12. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    Got all the stuff I needed and prepared for the push pins of death procedure.
    Im about to throw something right now. Two of the white plastic legs (one on two different pins) snapped off, pretty much meaning I cant use the heatsink. Is there anything with glue or zipties or something I can do to fix this stuff?
    Whoever created push pins for heatsink installation needs to be fired. Feels like im about to break to mobo trying to get them in in the first place (and yes, im installing them correcty.)

    I wish I stopped when I had three of the pins in but I was trying so hard to get the fourth. Now I cant even do it. Glue? anything? PLEASE HELP.
     
  13. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    Dont use glue. Just run some zipties through the mobo, around the back (you may have to take off the back mounting plate) and then up and over the heatsink/fan. I agree with you, push pins are the death of things and are an absolute nightmare. I messed with them a few times when I worked at the computer club house and they suck.
     
  14. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    Any alternative to zipties?
     
  15. LukeDJ

    LukeDJ TS Addict Posts: 414   +112

    Dude, I'd just buy a new cooler, you don't want to be running a PC with zip ties holding the heat-sink to the CPU, you're just asking for trouble. Get a cheap aftermarket cooler like the Hyper 212 Plus (not an evo, which is not compatible with 775) and you'll get much better temperatures and the ability to overclock if you desire.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103065
     
  16. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    I had zip ties holding a 92mm zalman fan to the stock P4 heatsink forever. Best alternative I can think of is yarn or fishing string. Both are strong and non conductive. If the heatsink isnt held down well against the CPU leaving an air gap you could nuke your chip though. So ya wanna make sure its a strong solution. I left my PC on its side as a precaution while mine was zip-tied but then it lived on and years later my little brother kept the rig upright. I buy aftermarket coolers just to avoid intels peg leg heatsinks. I was providing a solution to get you up and going for the moment :)
     
  17. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    Or Artic Alumina is a thermal adhesive that can glue the heatsink to the chip. Just throwing things out there
     
  18. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    Read they buying the right size screws alongside some washers and nuts can be a better permenant solution than the clips, if I remove the clips and use those wholes. Possible?
    Thanks for helping BTW.
     
  19. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    Sounds likely to me. Just get some rubber, plastic, nylon, whatever non conductive washers. Make sure no metal is touching traces on the motherboard or it'll short.
     
  20. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    Kk> So wait, if I were to use, zipties, would I wrap the zip ties around the entire board to get them through the heatsink and the board? how would I use zipties?
     
  21. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    Lol.. just put one end through the mounting hole in the motherboard, you might have to take out the pegs on the heatsink so the mounting holes arent blocked. Im not quite sure what the situation looks like. But put one side through the mobo mounting hole, pull it on the back side of the mobo and put it through the other hole across from it, them up and over the heatsink. Zip the ends together, use a screw driver to push down on the square end and pliers to pull on the long end to make it snug/tight. Do that for each side.. just through the mobo mounting holes and up and over the heatsink/fan. done deal hopefully
     
  22. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    Went out and bought some 6-32 machine screws, rubber washers, and the bolts that came with the screws. Put the washers directly underneath the head of the screw (like, they were rubbing against the bottom of the head) fed the screw into the CPU mount hole (so the head and the washer were underneath the mobo), and put the nuts over the top of the screw and tightened them down over the holes in the heatsink where the pins used to be (pulled them out) I was getting good temp readings (which I cannot remember but I will post them here when I check) however the AUX reading in speedfan was 128C...which is over freaking boiling point, meaning if that was an actual temperature, I thought I would be able to tell. The heatsink in the middle of the mobo felt warm (I think thats the chipset?) but I dont think I would have been able to touch it at all if itt was 128C, right? Just wanna make sure that its a fluke, like most of the internet said.

    Alright update the CPU is running fantastically, speedfan "temp" reading is 39, CPU reading is 20 degrees (DANG) each core is in the upper 20s lower 30s. However aux is at 127 (likely a bug) but the "system" reading is at 96 DEGREES. went to shutdown until I find a solution.

    EDIT: system is now reading at 38 celcius. Only bad one is AUX which I think is a glitch. So surprisingly, its all smooth. And my 3 dollar-at-lowes mounting system is giving me significantly lower temps than the push pins did. Thanks for all the help!

    OK one more update...the mobo temp changes between like 38 and like 100 randomly from boot to boot..its odd...seems like s sensor problem but I have no idea which reading is accurate
     
  23. ---agissi---

    ---agissi--- TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,384   +15

    Ya buggy sensors are super common, I think I see one thats bugged out on damn near every computer I've read readings off. Even my new A8-3870K AMD build I just made for myself has a false reading. It sounds like you did a great job, way to go /w the trip to Lowes :) Just set the shutdown temp. in your bios to 70*C and you'll be fine. If the machine actually gets too hot the bios will shut it down before any damage is done. And ya that warm chip in the middle of your motherboard is probably your South Bridge chipset. I think all the North Bridges these days (the ones that used to be in the middle of the board, with the south bridge in the bottom corner underneath the PCI slots) are integrated into cpus these days. Thats why you only see one heatsink when there used to be two besides the cpu's.
     
  24. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,921   +373

    Ah ok. thanks. Will remember to do that. Thanks for all the help!
     


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