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Mercedes-Benz to compete with Tesla in home battery market

By Shawn Knight
Jun 10, 2015
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  1. mercedes-benz tesla elon musk home battery powerwall tesla powerwall powerpack home battery system tesla powerpack

    Tesla isn’t the only automaker interested in outfitting your home with giant battery packs. German-based Daimler – of which Mercedes-Benz is a division of – is now accepting pre-registrations for a home battery system that operates on the same general concept as Tesla’s Powerwall.

    Mirroring Tesla, Daimler said the batteries that’ll power its Mercedes-Benz energy storage units were originally designed to power electric vehicles. And much like Tesla, customers can use them to store solar energy and draw power from the grid during off-peak hours when energy costs are cheaper.

    Where the Mercedes-Benz solution differs, however, is in the fact that it is modular.

    mercedes-benz tesla elon musk home battery powerwall tesla powerwall powerpack home battery system tesla powerpack

    The system will accept up to eight 2.5kWh battery modules for a total capacity of 20kWh. Tesla, meanwhile, only offers two configurations for home use: a 7kWh system priced at $3,000 and a 10kWh variant that’ll set you back $3,500 (plus installation costs). Daimler will also offer an industrial version of its system like Tesla does with its Powerpack although it hasn’t yet revealed how much either system will sell for.

    Tesla has already dispelled any notion that such a system wouldn’t generate interest among consumers. CEO Elon Musk said that in the week following its announcement, more than 38,000 customers reserved a Powerwall for their homes. The company also received 2,800 reservations for the industrial Powerpack. These pre-orders alone were enough to push production back until mid-2016.

    Daimler said it plans to formally present the Mercedes-Benz energy storage plants for private and industrial use at the Intersolar trade-fair in Munich, Germany, on June 10.

    Permalink to story.

     
  2. VitalyT

    VitalyT Russ-Puss Posts: 3,149   +1,424

    It better cost not more than $1000, with such comparatively pathetic capacity.
     
  3. MilwaukeeMike

    MilwaukeeMike TS Evangelist Posts: 2,750   +1,105

    Huh? Telsa's powerwall is modular. From their own website ..
    http://www.teslamotors.com/powerwall
     
    lipe123 likes this.
  4. Cycloid Torus

    Cycloid Torus TS Evangelist Posts: 1,657   +309

    Interested? Take a look at Redflow's chemical battery ( http://redflow.com/products/zbm/ ). Redflow is from Australia, but the manufacturing is being done by Flextronics.

    24v and 48v look like the future.
     
  5. Coming from Mercedes, it will probably cost twice as much and last half as long. No thank you...
     
  6. I have no confidence in Mercedes. ...Bought one of their vehicles.
     
  7. lipe123

    lipe123 TS Evangelist Posts: 658   +174

    Exactly my thoughts! Still it's good to see more interest in the concept, hopefully in 10-20 years we can convert the entire planet to solar wind and nuclear.
     
  8. risc32

    risc32 TS Booster Posts: 195   +87

    Call me when a passenger jet runs on solar or wind.
     
  9. I still prefer Tesla powerwall rather than mercedes' home battery if you ask me. Although Tesla only offers two configurations (7kwh and 10kwh), but, you can buy more than one and then linked it, they are modular.

    And FYI, while people still debating which is best mercedes or tesla battery, there are tons of similar product (home battery) out there in the market..
     
  10. lipe123

    lipe123 TS Evangelist Posts: 658   +174

    http://www.solarimpulse.com

    If they can already do this much right now I'm pretty confident we can do more in 10 years.
    It's not a question of "if" anymore. If we don't change the way things are done our grandkids will have a pretty shitty place to live.
     
  11. ChrisH1

    ChrisH1 TS Rookie Posts: 18   +7

    None of these really appeal to me. What's 7.5KWh? or 20 for that matter? It could run my airconditioning for 1 hour (2 for the 20) - if it could output the power, that is. My understanding is the Tesla can only output about 3.5Kw per hour. All sorts of thing in the house such as the stove would suck that dry. I'd be more interested in a 100Kwh industrial module.
     
  12. Your aircon must be massive or really inefficient to draw 7.5kw per h. From memory the input power is roughly a third of the cooling/heating output, we have a 10kw cooling/heating system and it draws about 3kw when running flat out but only around 0.9 when maintaining house temp.

    In saying that your point is still valid as 7kwh battery pack if you had a few cloudy days in a row would not be enough but I think we would get by on a 10kwh one just fine...... maybe get two
     
  13. "None of these really appeal to me. What's 7.5KWh? or 20 for that matter? It could run my airconditioning for 1 hour (2 for the 20) - if it could output the power, that is. My understanding is the Tesla can only output about 3.5Kw per hour. All sorts of thing in the house such as the stove would suck that dry. I'd be more interested in a 100Kwh industrial module."

    LOL, what kind of airconditioning you got there? 20 kwH for 2 hour??!! are you using massive-industrial grade airconditioning? With that battery capacity, it could run my house for 2 days straight (including 3 Airconditioners, 3 PCs, 4 LED TVs, 1 microwave, 1 refrigerator, etc etc)
     
  14. Camikazi

    Camikazi TS Maniac Posts: 817   +231

    My house right now uses about 16kWh, according to my electric bill, per day and a 10kWh battery would be very useful. I am assuming this, like any battery, can charge while being used so it's not 10kWh and then it stops to charge but charges while working as long as there is sun meaning that it can probably power my house all day.
     
  15. wiyosaya

    wiyosaya TS Evangelist Posts: 1,035   +269

    Low-voltage systems have been around for a while because you minimize losses of conversion to 120 - 240 volts. 12V, 24V, and 48V are common output voltages for solar cell arrays. In a totally off-grid and or a remote system, my bet is that they are the norm.
     
  16. wiyosaya

    wiyosaya TS Evangelist Posts: 1,035   +269

    As an average, the earth receives about 1kW/square meter in the form of sunlight. Clouds can cut this down to 1/3 of that. So, even if it is a cloudy day, the system may still charge as long as the drain on the pack does not exceed the input from the sun.

    Whether it can power your house all day depends on the size of the solar charging array and whether there are high peak load devices - such as an electric dryer - that you need to run. Running an electric dryer off a 10 kWh battery pack will probably at best give you one to two hours of run time.
     
  17. wiyosaya

    wiyosaya TS Evangelist Posts: 1,035   +269

    Actually, the 3.5kWh Tesla unit can output 3.5kW for one hour. After that, it is drained and can output no more without a recharge. Basically, the kWh rating is how many kW the unit can output for one hour. If the rating is 20kWh, then it can output 20kW for one hour without needing a recharge.
     
  18. Camikazi

    Camikazi TS Maniac Posts: 817   +231

    Yeah, that is what I figure and even if it has to tap in to the grid it would be cheap compared to electricity rates in some areas.
     

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