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New graphics card help

By Benzz
Jan 6, 2010
  1. Ok well I just got a XFX radeon 5750 PCIe 1gig graphic card and I put it in fine then when I went to connect the monitor cable to the graphics card I realised it was to small. I was told I need some kind of DVI to VGA adaptor and what I didn't realise is there a few types like DVI-a and stuff. I was wondering if someone could tell me exactly what I needa get because I dont know anything about it. Thanks!
     
  2. mailpup

    mailpup TS Special Forces Posts: 6,980   +362

    Get a DVI-I to VGA adapter. The DVI-I will pass through the analog signal the VGA monitor needs.
     
  3. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

    Ok well I got the adaptor but now my screen would go black. So I got it out, and deleted my previous graphic drivers (Though I just installed windows 7 and I don't even think they were installed in the first place). Then for some reason It wouldn't get into the graphic driver install disk, so I went to the ati site and downloaded the latest graphic driver. When I installed it I restarted with everything plugged in and I've still got a black screen? The graphics card fan isn't spinning either, does anyone know the problem?
     
  4. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,891   +1,258

    This might be stating the obvious....but you plugged in the 6 pin PCIe power cable, right?

    Assuming the answer to the question is yes, then can you provide some information about your power supply - Brand/model/12 volt amp specification and it's approximate age.
     
  5. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 6,000   +15

    you can buy adapters at most electronics stores like radio shack or get one online. too easy.

    if your screen is blank, do you have your onboard video on? turn it off in BIOS.
     
  6. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

    I was told by someone else that the 6 pin cable was just some spare cable that I didn't need lol, I'm guessing this was the problem then. But after looking at my power supply I don't see anywhere where I can plug it in
     
  7. mailpup

    mailpup TS Special Forces Posts: 6,980   +362

    It may be that your power supply is inadequate to power the new card but let's assume, for the moment, that it is. Didn't your new graphics card come with an adapter? If not, you can buy one that converts two free 4 pin molex connectors into one 6 pin PCI-E connector. If you don't have two free standard molex connectors, you should definitely get a new power supply.

    You will need a good quality PSU of 450W or better.
     
  8. Kevork

    Kevork TS Rookie Posts: 73

    I completly agree with mailpup. Most New Video cards require independant power supply. The PCI express slots do not provide enough juice for the GPU.

    Replace the power supply and power that puppy.
     
  9. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,891   +1,258

    If your present power supply has a +12volt rating of 38 amps you would be ok- assuming the power supply isn't more than a couple of years old.
    If this is the case then the XFX card you have included a cable with a 6 pin PCIe connector at one end (that goes into the corresponding plug at the back of the card). The other end has 2 peripheral (molex) 4 pin plugs which you plug into the corresponding plugs on the power supply cables. If the sticker on the power supply says you have more than one 12 volt rail -the sticker will say 12V1, 12V2, 12V3 etc in this case- and you have more than one cable with molex plugs on it then plug one molex per cable- this will spread out the load (power draw) and make for more stable power delivery.
    If your power supply needs replacing -you'll most likely need a GOOD branded psu with the required amperage then it should already be equipped with one (and probably 2 or more) 6 pin PCIe connector.

    Your card will not run without the 6 pin power connected.
    Re-post if you have any questions regarding a suitable replacement power supply-if thats the case then include your location and access to etailers.
     
  10. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

    Ok well I was planning to get this, Huntkey OEM V-Power 500W PSU $50. Since it's the cheapest I could find in Australia. This is the cable my graphics card came with a Molex to 6pin PCI Express Adapter. What other cable do I need to make this all work?
    And I don't get how the 6pin adapter works, the description said I can use my graphics card without upgrading my PSU (Even though I will since I only got 350w). Could someone tell me how it works?

    And is installing a new PSU hard, The installing bit I can do I think but I'm not sure if I'll know what cable goes into what.
     
  11. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,891   +1,258

    I'm going to presume this is the psu
    http://www.pcbodega.com/pcbshop/index.php?c=69&p=8910

    Not good.
    First off the 12v rails combine for 36 amps -might get you through in a squeeze if you run a minimalist computer system...BUT..the kicker is this line "Efficiency: 70%Min,at full load 230VAC/50Hz" -quite frankly that is abysmal- 70% of 500w = 350w ugh!
    The psu is the heart of the computer system-a bad one can literally fry your system.
    You're in Aussie- just over the ditch-so checking what's available here at an affordable price should also be available to you:

    Vantec Ion2 + (Plus) 520w (model VAN-520C)....cheapest
    Thermaltake Litepower 600w (model w0355)
    Gigabyte Odin 585w
    Vantec Ion2 + (Plus) 620w (model VAN-620C)
    Vantec Ion2 + (Plus) 500w (model VAN-500N)
    Thermaltake Litepower 700w (model w0356)
    Vantec Ion2 + (Plus) 600w (model VAN-600N)

    What description told you that you didn't have to upgrade your psu ? sounds very misleading.

    There is a small black plug socket attached to the circuit board at the back of the card- you push a 6 pin PCIe plug from the power supply into it- the psu PCIe plug (it should be marked PCIe) can only fit one way into the card socket.

    Installing a new power supply is not difficult.
    Keep the power cord plugged into the psu and the wall socket (BUT NOT SWITCHED ON) while you work-touching the case/power supply as you work will greatly lessen the chance of you zapping anything with static electicity-unplug the cord when youre ready to take out the psu.
    When installing it note what plugs and cables are attached before unplugging them to remove the psu- note how the cables are placed in the chassis and watch out for any cables secured by zip ties (cable ties)
    Lay the case on its side.
    As you unplug each cable , identify the same plug on the new power supply (you could make a note of each and its placement). Unscrew the screws attaching the psu to the case (usually 4 screws). The next step once ALL the cables are detached is to gently lift the power supply out of the case - WITHOUT hitting or contacting the other components- this may require some careful manipulation and I recommend that you bunch all the power cables first (tie them together) and lay them out of the way over the side of the case.
    Fitting the new psu is the exact reverse of the above procedure.
    The cables you will be unplugging/plugging in are:
    A 20 or 24 pin motherboard plug (has its own cable)
    A 4 or 8 pin auxillary motherboard cable (has its own cable)
    A 6 pin PCIe cable (back of graphics card) ( 1 or 2 per cable)
    1 SATA power plug (for SATA harddrive) or 1 molex plug (IDE harddrive) for every harddrive.
    1 SATA or Molex plug (SATA or IDE) fro every CD or DVD drive.
    A Molex plug for fans if they use the power supply to draw power.

    Post back if you have any other questions or problems - we'll be here.
     
  12. mailpup

    mailpup TS Special Forces Posts: 6,980   +362

    The power supply is the one thing you don't want to buy the cheapest of. Some other components you can get away with it but not the power supply. It doesn't have to be the most expensive either but buying the cheapest is false economy.

    Just to clarify about the adapter, you take two unused 4 pin molex power connectors (coming from the power supply) and plug them into the two receiving ends of the adapter cable assembly and plug the 6 pin end of the assembly into the graphics card as dividebyzero described. I know this is basically what dividebyzero already said but you still seemed to have a question about it. BTW, using the adapter is not an upgrade of your PSU. It's just a way of using your current PSU without having to buy another. That said, the description saying you don't have to upgrade your PSU isn't universally correct. It can't possibly take into account everyone's low powered PSU. Anyway, just some thoughts that I hope helps.
     
  13. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

    Ok well I ended up getting a 600w vantec PSU, I'm installing it now the only problem is the fans (1 of the side and 1 stuck on the mother board) are just stuck there, and are connected to the previous PSU, am I meant to take them out? If so how do I take the 1 off the motherboard because I already managed to get the 1 on the side out.
     
  14. mailpup

    mailpup TS Special Forces Posts: 6,980   +362

    Can't the fans be disconnected from the old power supply? They can't be permanently connected.

    What motherboard or PC brand and model do you have?
     
  15. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,891   +1,258

    If the motherboard fan is connected to the motherboard then you DO NOT need to unplug it-most likely this is either the CPU fan or a chipset fan.
    If the side (case ?) fan is connected to the power supply then disconnect it and connect the same type of connector on the new power supply to it.
    If the side fan is connected to motherboard then you don't need to disconnect it.
     
  16. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

    Well the motherboard brand is Asus, fan brand is Intel. And they look pretty permanent to me, when I lift up the intel sticker on the fan (Where the wires are connected) theres 4 very small wires connected which don't look like that can be taken out.
     
  17. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

    It seems that both the side fan and the 1 on the motherboard and connected to the PSU.
     
  18. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,891   +1,258

  19. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

    Nah they look quite different, both the fan's wires are tightly connected to a chip with like a bit of metal over it.
     
  20. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,891   +1,258

    Can you supply a model number for the motherboard? Or the computer system name if it bought pre-built. If you could attach some clear pictures of the board area including the fan attachments that would be very, very handy.
    Can't say that I've ever heard of a power supply hardwired to a mainboard in such a way before.
     
  21. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

  22. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,891   +1,258

    Ok, that's much more illuminating.
    You can restick the the Intel sticker down on the fan. The other end of the wires are where the connector is. Very carefully cut the big clear plastic cable ties without cutting the wires and follow the wires that lead from the fan to where they will most likely terminate in a small white plug similar if not the same as the first pic link I posted, which in turn should be connected to an adapter like this http://i2.ebayimg.com/02/i/000/de/6c/5e13_1.JPG
    Disconnect at the large plug (molex) junction-where the molex plug fits into the male end of the molex plug on the psu cable. If this is not the case then upload a photo of where the fan wires terminate.
     
  23. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

    Oh nvm I worked it out. Theres 1 more problem though, 1 of the connectors are really hard to reach (in a really right spot near the harddrive) is there a way to unscrew it to get there? I'll post a picture soon
     
  24. Benzz

    Benzz TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 30

  25. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,891   +1,258

    No worries- we're here to help.
    The CPU fan (the one with the Intel sticker on) definitely needs to be plugged in. It is probably best to plug it into the motherboard CPU fan header- it should be printed on the motherboard itself next to a small male 3 or 4 pin socket (called a pinout) like this (the little white plug next to the screw hole) http://tech.icrontic.com/draco/images/articles/gigabyte_ga8trs350mt_motherboard/cpu_fan_header.jpg
    If you have trouble locating it then find the model number of the board -being Asus it will probably be located between the PCI / PCIe slots and I'll check it's location for you.
    The CPU fan header will be close to the CPU fan itself.
    The other alternative is to buy one of the 3 pin to 4 pin adapters as in my last post- they are a couple of bucks from your local Di ck Smith's or electronics shop.
    Where is the other "side" fan located ? On the motherboard or attached to the computer case ?

    Lol - The site censored the Di ck Smith -hence the gap !
     
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