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New project: LGA 775 board w/ DDR3 needed -- thoughts please?

By HLG
Apr 27, 2012
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  1. Hello Everyone,

    Been a long time browser of TS and am glad to finally join. I am looking to utilize a Q6600 processor and the following system board and RAM:

    ASUS P5G41T-M LX Plus
    Corsair XMS3 1333MHz PC3-10666

    The goal is to moderately overclock the Q6600 to 3.2 GHz. In my research, I have read many positive reviews about the stability of ASUS boards, and the DDR3 capability is significant to me. However, from what I have gathered, this board can be fussy when overclocking the CPU. Has anyone had any experience with a similar setup?

    I would appreciate any thoughts/comments/suggestions.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +99

    Firstly, why do you need to overclock it? I'm guessing its more because you want to, than necessity, but my thoughts are below.

    I run the exact same CPU in my system 24/7 and while it might be long in the tooth compared with most systems on here, it's certainly not lacking at stock speeds as it is.

    Not sure if system specs is easily read right now, but for the sake of doubt, mine are: Intel Core2Quad Q6600 G0 stepping (at stock OC with Corsair H50 (push/pull) providing cooling), Abit AW9D-MAX, 8GB OCZ Gold series DDR2-1066, HD6870, Antec HCG-620 PSU, a SSD and six mechanical disks.

    I wouldn't call 3.2GHz a moderate OC on the Q6600, that's more like 2.8-3.0GHz. I used to have mine overclocked but the difference was so minimal (in real terms) that the additional heat it gave off and power it consumed made it pointless. I was never able to achieve 3.05GHz or above either, but I've no doubt that more experienced hands would have managed it. Overclocking is my weaker subject in the field of IT generally speaking, and I can't say I've ever really pushed the envelope very far in that regard.

    Though that said, I've always found Gigabyte boards to be much more forgiving when it comes to RAM settings. Asus in my experience can be a real nightmare with recognising the default timings and voltages for RAM, and in "my experience" need much more work to achieve the same result.

    Another point that needs to be considered is LGA-775 is legacy hardware now, so you'd be spending money on defunct hardware. If you have the CPU it might be better to grab a second-hand board off of eBay or something, or maybe look to something newer and more current.
     
  3. HLG

    HLG TS Rookie Topic Starter

    Some good points, thank you. You are correct, the OC is more a want than a specific need, although I'd like to at least run with a current generation i3. :)

    I put together a spec for a new build with all the latest and greatest, but it would be relatively costly and frankly, overkill for my purposes at the moment. The Q6600 wouldn't cost me anything, and for $60 I can pick up a new, stable, ASUS board that will allow me to utilize DDR3 RAM. Allow me to post the build specs I am toying with at the moment:

    NZXT Source 220 - $60
    ASUS P5G41T - $60
    Corsair XMS3 8GB - $45
    Hyper 212 Cooler - $25
    ASUS DVD Drive - $20
    CM Elite 460W - $20

    I have a spare graphics card and 7200 RPM drive I can include in this build at no additional cost.

    So for $230, I can build a unit that would serve my purposes without any issues, utilizing new parts. If I had to source an older processor, I'd be much more wary, but if I can build around an existing processor, I see value here.

    Could please elaborate on the issues you suspect will occur with this RAM + board combination?
     
  4. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +99

    Aye, the free CPU definitely makes it worth considering as long as the budget remains low.

    The RAM should be fine with the Asus board, but I would carefully check that BIOS reports the correct timings and voltages, as I'm yet to fit any RAM to an Asus motherboard where it did correctly set them by default. Though saying that, we're talking about 4-5 motherboards here, the oldest of which is a M5A78L LE AM3+ motherboard.

    The RAM is good. I actually have a set of the next one up, the DDR3-1600 as 4x 2GB (8GB) of Corsair XMS3, although they're not in use unless I decide to grab hold of a AMD FX CPU anytime soon.

    For what your looking to achieve the Asus is a good choice, although I'd settle for a Gigabyte equivalent if possible -- that's personal preference though, and not something you should use as a deciding factor, but it does you no harm to look.

    Also, if you got one with 4 RAM slots you'd be able to double the RAM -- given the price of it these days (and the fact it can be re-used later) its worth considering.

    The build looks fine to me, although I'd double check the PSU can handle the GPU you intend to use.

    I'd personally go with a Coolermaster HAF912 case (I own the HAF 912+ and its highly regarded) though.
     
  5. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,406   +1,595

    I agree with Leeky. I've not used a Q6600 but owned a Q9400 and had a similar experience. If you don't absolutely need the over-clock, watching temperatures and dealing with case cooling will get old.
     
  6. HLG

    HLG TS Rookie Topic Starter

    Thank you for your feedback Leeky. It has been very helpful.

    I missed out on a good offer on eBay:

    Inspiron 545s Bare Bones - $65

    Brand new case, system board and PSU for a great price. Won't compare to the ASUS board, but if I don't OC it should suffice. RAM would be a bit more expensive, but overall this would be a cheaper build than above and would meet my needs until I finally decide to put together a high end system.

    If it comes back at that price I just might have to pick one up.
     
  7. Mictlantecuhtli

    Mictlantecuhtli TS Evangelist Posts: 4,919   +9

    I bought ASUS P5G41T-M for my home server mainly because I had some spare DDR3 sticks & S775 CPU. I haven't overclocked it - actually I've thought of underclocking so maybe it could run cooler in the kitchen corner cabinet. It's been running stable for some months straight.
     


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