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Partitioning HD and formatting HD space issue

By markh
Oct 7, 2010
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  1. My HD's Total capacity is 76293MB and I have created 2 partitions. Forgetting about C: Partition 2 created – (D) 36295MB

    When I created partition D, 36295MB on my drive the actual size came up as 36287MB.

    Where did the other 8 MB go

    After formatting with ntfs the reported size is 35370MB

    Again where does the missing space go.

    Regards
    Mark
     
  2. JMMD

    JMMD TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 1,177

    File system overhead.
     
  3. LookinAround

    LookinAround TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 8,374   +167

  4. markh

    markh TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 22

    Can you elaborate on file system overhead.

    Thanks
    Mark
     
  5. hughva

    hughva TS Rookie Posts: 309

  6. markh

    markh TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 22

    Hi, many thanks for your reply and yes there is another partition 7MB. Is there a reason for this partition?

    Many Thanks
    Mark
     
  7. hughva

    hughva TS Rookie Posts: 309

    I assume it's because you chose not to use all the space.
    See if you can delete one partition and make a new partition that adds that space. I'm wondering if that disk has a requirement for the space?
     
  8. LookinAround

    LookinAround TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 8,374   +167

    OH!

    I'd make sure that's not a recovery or diagnostic partition from your system vendor before you delete it

    /* EDIT */
    Tho 8MB is probably too small for recovery partition, it may contain diagnostics - which you may or may not care about

    /* EDIT 2 */
    Is the partition formatted as FAT? If yes, is likely diagnostics. If not formatted, yea, you can probably just blow it away
     
  9. markh

    markh TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 22

    I use many different computers, all of which are partitioned and quriously all seem to have this 8MB partition. It must have some purpose. I remember reading that the File System reserves space to allow for the reallocatation of bad clusters, maybe this is the reserved space??

    Cheers
    Mark
     
  10. LookinAround

    LookinAround TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 8,374   +167

    You didn't answer last time: Are these 8MB partitions formatted as FAT??
     
  11. hughva

    hughva TS Rookie Posts: 309

    This seems to the explanation:
    The 8MB space at the end of the drive is not a partition, and not partitionable. It's reserved by Windows in case you want to use dynamic volumes. Most people don't use that anyway. You can't get around the 8MB reserved space using Windows because the behavior is by design.
    http://www.techsupportforum.com/microsoft-support/windows-xp-support/402956-8-mb-partition.html
    I've seen this on previous installs, but none of my current disks has it.
     
     
  12. LookinAround

    LookinAround TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 8,374   +167

    AND one has converted their disk from Basic to Dynamic. Then, yea, that would explain it. (By default, disks are Basic)

    @markh
    So the question is: When you look at Disk Management, does it say Basic or Dynamic under the Disk # in the lower pane?
     
  13. markh

    markh TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 22

    Update

    Disk type dynamic and no the disk is not formatted.
     
  14. LookinAround

    LookinAround TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 8,374   +167

    Bingo!!

    hughva nailed it! Good catch :grinthumb
     
  15. markh

    markh TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 22

    Update. I have worked on several Dell PC's since my last update and they have only 2 partitions (no 7 or 8 MB partition at the end). The 2 partitions are formatted with NTFS and both are of type Basic. I built 3 of them myself creating the partitions. There doesn't seem to be a standard reason for this, or is there?


    M
     
  16. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,446   +324

    No. Bad Blocks are contained within the partition.
     


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