Qualcomm teams up with Renault to trial wireless electric car charging

By Leeky
Jul 25, 2012
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  1. Qualcomm announced a new partnership yesterday with French carmaker Renault to begin field trials of its revolutionary wireless electric vehicle charging (WEVC) technology, which if successful could lead to a wider adoption of all-electric vehicles along with various potential uses……

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  2. Lurker101

    Lurker101 TechSpot Addict Posts: 626   +122

    So basically, they're planning on charging cars like toothbrushes.
  3. ikesmasher

    ikesmasher TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 1,856   +343

    come back when you can make an all electric vehicle thats fun to drive... :p
  4. Lurker101

    Lurker101 TechSpot Addict Posts: 626   +122

    If you get drunk enough, a milk float can be fun to drive. Does that count?
  5. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    Black Swans, highly improbable innovations with huge implications, suggest future cars can become power plants when parked.

    See Moving Beyond Oil and Cheap Green on the Aesop Institute website.

    This technology can be designed to work in reverse and feed power to the grid.

    Cars so equipped might even pay for themselves.

    Imagine the impact on the economy when these vehicles become practical!
  6. Lurker101

    Lurker101 TechSpot Addict Posts: 626   +122

    These cars will never become practical though. I've seen plans somewhere on putting this magnetic charge tech into roads, so that drivers don't need to park for a week before they can go for an hours drive. That way they can literally just drive as long as they want. Thankfully, that's about as feasible and economic as building a step ladder that can reach the moon.
    Electric cars are the Windows Vista of the automotive industry. Ignore them and wait for the hydrogen fuel cell powered cars.
  7. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    Electric cars are the Windows Vista of the automotive industry. Ignore them and wait for the hydrogen fuel cell powered cars.[/quote]

    Fuels cells that need only have water - fresh or salt - added, instead of hydrogen, are close to production in Vietnam.

    The nanotech lab where they were invented is headed by an American who holds 37 patents. Most were obtained when he was a senior scientist at HP and Kodak.

    There is a bit about them on Moving Beyond Oil and Cheap Green on the Aesop Institute website.

    These are Black Swans. They reflect new science. Very hard to believe but apparently very real.
  8. Lurker101

    Lurker101 TechSpot Addict Posts: 626   +122

    Can't help but suspect this guy has an agenda...
    ikesmasher likes this.
  9. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    My agenda can be found on the opening pages of the Aesop Institute website. I would like to see action that prevents grid collapse due to a highly possible solar storm emission. Grids that supply power to nuclear plants and fail for two weeks create a meltdown condition. We have 70 such plants in the USA and many more exist worldwide.

    New technology might prevent that potential nuclear nightmare. I have no financial involvement with the firm involved.
  10. I'd like to see an LPG / electric hybrid with kers etc. But an electric only vehicle won't suit my needs due to range and charging times; unless they triple the range without increasing weight and cut the charging time to 10% of that which current battery tech allows.
  11. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    See Moving Beyond Oil on the Aesop Institute website for a 5 minute charge for electric cars being developed by Hydro Quebec.

    And batteries below it that will greatly increase the range.
     
  12. gwailo247

    gwailo247 TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,105   +18

    He sure pops up on Google a lot as an officer of energy firms, and heads a NPO actively soliciting donations. But no financial interest...
  13. Arminator

    Arminator Newcomer, in training

    Haha very funny photo... They mention French carmaker Renault and they post a photo of Citroen car! :)
    Leeky likes this.
  14. Zoltan Head

    Zoltan Head TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 268   +27

    If you think a solar-storm induced outage can cause meltdown, think again. There is no physical mechanism for this result.
    You would like to see action to prevent it - good, it's already there!
  15. Leeky

    Leeky TechSpot Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 4,378   +98

    I thought it was rather ironic as well. At least its still a French car I guess! haha.
  16. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    Unfortunately, a solar storm induced outage can indeed cause a nuclear plant meltdown. See Dire Warnings on the Aesop institute website.

    Matthew Stein has addressed this issue at length. 400 Chernobyls is one of his articles detailing the mechanism.
  17. Lurker101

    Lurker101 TechSpot Addict Posts: 626   +122

    You heard him guys, we'd all better switch to solar powered tin foil hats at once.
  18. spydercanopus

    spydercanopus TechSpot Guru Posts: 802   +87

    "If your hand gets caught in the beam, it's gonna go numb for hours."
     
  19. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    No tin foil hats. It is hard to bury your head in the sand wearing one...
  20. Zoltan Head

    Zoltan Head TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 268   +27

    No it can't, really! (I am a real physicist, it isn't just a guess:))
    Lurker101 likes this.
  21. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    According to a 2011 report by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The loss of power to nuclear power plants would threaten to create a whole string of Fukushima-type disasters around the globe. The core meltdowns last March was caused by the loss of power to the reactor cooling systems which made the nuclear fuel rods overheat. A potential loss of power for weeks at a time, such as would result from a Solar Superstorm, could overwhelm the capacity of emergency electrical power systems at nuclear generating plants to cope.
  22. Zoltan Head

    Zoltan Head TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 268   +27

    This is rubbish, there is no mechanism by which that could happen - yes, the grid could temporarily fry, the reactors would be fine!

    PS I wonder where a power plant could find a backup supply - clearly not possible;)
  23. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    Unfortunately, the world’s nuclear power plants, as they are currently designed, are critically dependent upon maintaining connection to a functioning electrical grid, for all but relatively short periods of electrical blackouts, in order to keep their reactor cores continuously cooled so as to avoid catastrophic reactor core meltdowns and spent fuel rod storage pond fires.

    If an extreme geomagnetic storm were to cause widespread grid collapse (which it most certainly will), in as little as one or two hours after each nuclear reactor facility’s backup generators either fail to start, or run out of fuel, the reactor cores will start to melt down. After a few days without electricity to run the cooling system pumps, the water bath covering the spent fuel rods stored in “spent fuel ponds” will boil away, allowing the stored fuel rods to melt down and burn. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently mandates that less than one week’s supply of backup generator fuel needs to be stored at each reactor site, it is likely that after we witness the spectacular night-time celestial light show from the next extreme geomagnetic storm we will have about one week in which to prepare ourselves for Armageddon.

    To do nothing is to behave like ostriches with our heads in the sand, blindly believing that “everything will be okay,” as our world inexorably drifts towards the next naturally recurring, 100% inevitable, super solar storm and resultant extreme geomagnetic disaster. The result of which in short order will end the industrialized world as we know it, incurring almost incalculable suffering, death, and environmental destruction on a scale not seen since the extinction of the dinosaurs some 65 million years ago.

    Matthew Stein 400 Chernobyls - very slightly edited MG

    New technology, under development by Advanced Fusion Systems, can protect the giant grid transformers from collapse. There are an estimated 22,000 of them worldwide. A massive program is needed to install them as fast as is humanly possible. Note: I have no financial interest in that firm.
  24. It's STILL rubbish, however many reiterations you bore everyone with!

    No mechanism for what you propose (sorry, yes I know I already said that, but the message wasn't received!)
  25. Mark Goldes

    Mark Goldes Newcomer, in training

    Space Weather, Geomagnetic Storms and their impacts on Electric Power Grids and other critical infrastructures.
    Power Electronics for HVDC and FACTS applications and the development of the Electron Tube technology.

    Mr. Kappenman provided presentations to the US Presidents’ Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection on the Potential Impact of Geomagnetic Storms on Electric Power System Reliability. He has also served on the Science Advisors Panel for the NOAA Space Environment Center.

    Mr. Kappenman was one of the principle investigators under contract with the Congressional Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP Commission). Mr. Kappenman has presented testimony before the US House Science Committee in October 2003 on the importance of geomagnetic storm forecasting for the electric power industry. He was a principal investigator examining the Vulnerability of the Electric Power Grid for Severe Geomagnetic Storms for FEMA under Executive Order 13407. He was also one of the Principal Contributors to the 2008 US National Academy of Sciences Report on “Severe Space Weather Events—Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts”.
    Specialties

    Power Electronic Applications with Advanced Electron Tube Technology
    Space Weather, Geomagnetic Storms

    What is rubbish is your ignorant comments. There is indeed a mechanism invented and patented by Curtis Birnbach working jointly with Kappenman, who not long ago authored a IEEE paper on the subject.


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