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Question about P4S800

By HitmanAngel2k3
Jun 9, 2005
  1. I'm building a new system :bounce: and I have a few questions:
    First question is about mobo. I was wondering if ASUS P4S800 will handle 3 sticks of 1024Mb pc3200, 128x4 high density, RAM? i just wanna make sure that it will before i'll buy those sticks...thank you for your information in advance.
    Second question is about CPU compatibility. Will ASUS P4S800 handle Intel Pentium 4 3.0 Ghz 800Mhz 1M L2 Cache CPU Processor? I believe its also a Prescott core CPU.
    Thanks again for all your help in advance.

    P.S. Also what motherboard would u recommend to get to use with that CPU (Intel Pentium 4 3.0 Ghz 800Mhz 1M L2 Cache CPU). thanks in advance.
     
  2. GoAvalanche

    GoAvalanche TS Rookie Posts: 42

    Go here to find out specs on that mobo: http://www.asus.com/
    Look under products, mobo, click p4s800 it will show acceptable memory.
     
  3. HitmanAngel2k3

    HitmanAngel2k3 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 58

    Was there....

    i was on ASUS's site before and cudn't find any information about acceptance of High Density RAM, 128x4 or low density 64x4 sticks...thats what i'm tryin to figure out what density ram to get...i can't reach ASUS...they don't answer me yet
     
  4. HitmanAngel2k3

    HitmanAngel2k3 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 58

    --=bump=--
     
  5. GoAvalanche

    GoAvalanche TS Rookie Posts: 42

    It seem to me they tell you how much of each type of ram the mobo will accept.
     
  6. HitmanAngel2k3

    HitmanAngel2k3 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 58

    yeah, i got that answered, thank you :)
    but what i need to know now is Highdensity or Low Density sticks of RAM?
     
  7. GoAvalanche

    GoAvalanche TS Rookie Posts: 42

    Step 1: RAM Density Definition

    RAM Density is the capacity or size of a DIMM module or the capacity or size of each DRAM unit on a DIMM or RIMM. Density is normally referred to in megabits (Mb) when referring to DRAM units and in megabytes (MB) when referring to an entire DIMM module.

    Step 2: Density vs. Speed

    When trying to determine what kind of RAM you need, the density of each DRAM unit on a DIMM is probably more important than the speed of the DIMM. For example, PC133 DIMMs are backward compatible to PC100 and PC66. On the other hand, 256 and 512 megabit technology DIMMs will not work in many motherboards.

    Step 3: How To Determine RAM Density

    It's hard to figure out the density of a DIMM because there are multiple industry "standards" on how describe a DIMM, many of which are contradictory. Some retailers list the capacity of each DRAM unit in MB and the number of DRAM units on the DIMM. For example, a 256 MB 16X16 PC133 Non-ECC Unbuffered DIMM has 16 DRAM chips, and each chip is 16 MB in size. The density of each DRAM unit is found by multiplying 16 MB by 8 to get the value in bits rather than bytes (one byte is 8 bits). In this case, the density is 128 Mb.

    Step 4: What Your Motherboard Will Take

    You may know that the maximum size RAM module your computer will accept is 256 MB and that it needs to meet a specific specification, such as PC133. Assuming the naming scheme of the last step, if you were to purchase a 256 MB 32X8 Non-ECC PC133 Unbuffered DIMM, the density is 256 Mb. This was determined by multiplying the number 32 by 8 bits. But because compatibility is based on the density of EACH DRAM unit on a memory module instead of the capacity of the DIMM as a whole, this DIMM probably won't work in your machine.

    Step 5: Explanation

    A motherboard that only accepts 256 MB and smaller sized DIMMS will work only with memory that is based on 128 Mb technology or lower. The DIMM in this example has 8 DRAM units, each with a capacity of 32 MB. If 16 DRAM units were used, the capacity of this DIMM would be 512 MB, and it would only work in motherboards that accept 512 MB DIMMs or higher, even though it is just 256 MB in size. This is due to the density of each DRAM unit on the DIMM.

    Step 6: What Will Happen?

    Remember that maximum capacity is based on the density of each DRAM unit on the DIMM and assumes the maximum number of DRAM units are on the DIMM. If you try to install a higher density DIMM than your computer can handle, one of two things will happen: 1) Your computer will not boot, and you will receive memory POST beeps, letting you know there is a problem. 2) The motherboard will only recognize half of the memory.















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  8. GoAvalanche

    GoAvalanche TS Rookie Posts: 42

    I hope this clears up your question.
    G-Day
     
  9. HitmanAngel2k3

    HitmanAngel2k3 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 58

    RAM density

    it sort of did make it clear...but what threw me off was this line "128X4 High Density chip configuration (Not compatible with Intel & Nvidia chipset motherboard. Please check in my store for 64X8 Low Density 1GB DDR)"
    so thats why i'm like still wondering which one to take, the HighDensity or LowDensity RAM for ASUS P4S800 mobo.
    Thank you for your information though. :)
     
  10. HitmanAngel2k3

    HitmanAngel2k3 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 58

    "PC2100/PC1600 up to 3 DIMMs; PC3200/PC2700 up to 2 DIMMs; 1GB PC3200/2700 with 32 DDR chips up to 1 DIMM only"
    what does 32 DDR chips suppose to mean? does that mean Highdensity...or i'm just so lost...sorry, but i'm pretty new about RAMs :confused:
     
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